MakarovaFan

Most Handsome Male Dancer(s)

218 posts in this topic

Edward Villella

Grant, his recent performance of the Pas from The Nutcracker was beautiful. His handsome looks were complimented by his ability to make his partner look like everything was effortless. He enabled her to go for anything knowing that he was there. He was beautiful to watch, and made his partner look even better.

When or where did Grant danced the Nutcracker PDD? Thanks.

I saw Grant Delong as Nutcracker Cavalier at the Hershey Theatre December 20 - 21, partnering Sarah Walborn. Beautiful.

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Nikolaj Hübbe

Robert Fairchild

Zachary Catazaro

Jose Carreño

Maxim Beloserkovsky

Cory Stearns

Ruben Martin

Sean Orza

Lucien Postlewaite

Seth Orza

Jerome Tisserand

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1. Roberto Bolle

2. Angel Corella

3. Andris Liepa

4. JM Correno

5. Mikhail Baryshnikov

7. Farukh Ruzimatov

8. Maris Liepa

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My vote is for Roberto Bolle.

:lol:

Peter Martins in his youth (actually he's still quite handsome).

And, my favorite male dancer (ever) -- the gorgeous Jock Soto.

Others:

Gonzalo Garcia (stunning up close)

David Hallberg

Damien Smith

Tyler Angle

Edwaard Liang! (very handsome)

Chris Wheeldon

Adrian Danching-Waring

Amar Ramasar

Albert Evans

Peter Boal

(and the aftermentioned Nicolaj, Ethan, Angel, etc.)

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Jonathan Cope, Edward Watson (I like the Brits:)) and I recently noticed that Jiri and Otto Bubenicek are handsome as well!

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Mathieu Ganio. Too cute and such a classically elegant dancer.

Mathieu Ganio Proust Ballet

Thanks for the clip. Beautiful dancers, but I find the choreography to be clunky, pretentious, and sometimes just silly (OOF, right in the crotch!--a thing from the past best left unremembered). And can we call for a moratorium on hugging in pas de deux, straight, gay, or otherwise?

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And can we call for a moratorium on hugging in pas de deux, straight, gay, or otherwise?

I think we need to start a list.

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(OOF, right in the crotch!--a thing from the past best left unremembered). And can we call for a moratorium on hugging in pas de deux, straight, gay, or otherwise?

At least the 'right in the crotch' got me to watch it, like the rare and gifted 8-year-old I am, trying to find something challenging on BBC4, but AWFUL beyond imagining. It's enough to make Plutarch's edict of gracelessness as recalled vividly by Foucault ring almost totally true--at least while your watching such stupid crap. Yes, very pretty, even gorgeous, boys, but the silliness of 'St. Loup and Morel', just because it's prestigious to use Proust even though it ends up more like 'Caravaggio's Boys'. Plus the Faure, doubtless recalling 'Vinteuil's little phrase for Odette/Swann', now for some 'romance' between the aristocrat Saint-Loup and the 'talented but modest-beginnings violinist' Morel, who turns out to be the opportunisitic poulain/putain par excellence--later has as one of his clients the Prince de Guermantes, just using anybody--at least if they'd Morel more of a 'top', so they wouldn't both just come across as a couple of sissies. Not that I was expecting anything all that masculine-Western, etc., but whew! did I ever have to hold my nose on this one. Proust is not about 'romance' in the American sense anyway (nevermind it's french choreographed), Bataille says he sees Eros much more like Sade, and I agree. Sorry to be so :thumbsup: Who was the other boy? He was even handsomer, I thought. And wasn't Denys Ganio in something of Petit's Proust piece (or is this part of the same thing) that I think I saw, but I may be confusing.

I thought Denys, Mathieu's father, was the handsomer, though.

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(OOF, right in the crotch!--a thing from the past best left unremembered). And can we call for a moratorium on hugging in pas de deux, straight, gay, or otherwise?

At least the 'right in the crotch' got me to watch it, like the rare and gifted 8-year-old I am, trying to find something challenging on BBC4, but AWFUL beyond imagining. It's enough to make Plutarch's edict of gracelessness as recalled vividly by Foucault ring almost totally true--at least while your watching such stupid crap. Yes, very pretty, even gorgeous, boys, but the silliness of 'St. Loup and Morel', just because it's prestigious to use Proust even though it ends up more like 'Caravaggio's Boys'. Plus the Faure, doubtless recalling 'Vinteuil's little phrase for Odette/Swann', now for some 'romance' between the aristocrat Saint-Loup and the 'talented but modest-beginnings violinist' Morel, who turns out to be the opportunisitic poulain/putain par excellence--later a client of the Prince de Guermantes, just using anybody--at least if they'd Morel more of a 'top', so they wouldn't both just come across as a couple of sissies. Not that I was expecting anything all that masculine-Western, etc., but whew! did I ever have to hold my nose on this one. Proust is not about 'romance' in the American sense anyway (nevermind it's french choreographed), Bataille says he sees Eros much more like Sade, and I agree. Sorry to be so :thumbsup: Who was the other boy? He was even handsomer, I thought. And wasn't Denys Ganio in something of Petit's Proust piece (or is this part of the same thing) that I think I saw, but I may be confusing.

I thought Denys, Mathieu's father, was the handsomer, though.

I think you've spent more intellectual energy on this than the choreographer! And thank you for so doing--I'd like to find the Foucault you referenced; can you say where it appears? (EDITED TO ADD: found it, I think--HoS 3, right?)

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Thanks, Ray. It's in one of the volumes of Foucault's 'History of Sexuality', I think the last: 'The Care of the Self (Histoire de la sexualité, III: le souci de soi)', when he references Plutarch. Problem is, he seems to believe it himself to some degree (although others will disagree with that assessment). It's been awhile, and I don't have copies myself anymore, but they are all worth reading for things you would never have thought of, and even in translation, he's got a wonderful style.

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Thanks, Ray. It's in one of the volumes of Foucault's 'History of Sexuality', I think the last: 'The Care of the Self (Histoire de la sexualité, III: le souci de soi)', when he references Plutarch. Problem is, he seems to believe it himself to some degree (although others will disagree with that assessment). It's been awhile, and I don't have copies myself anymore, but they are all worth reading for things you would never have thought of, and even in translation, he's got a wonderful style.

Thanks again--love vol. 3 btw! (sorry, WAY o-t!)

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:) Jeremie Belingard of the POB, he is very attractive with high cheek bones a mass of curly (sometimes unruly) dark curls. he not only is an excellent dancer, but he sings well in his group callled Granny goes to heaven. Writing and playing his own songs with his cousin. (see Myspace and facebook.) In addition he appears in the TV and magazine Gautier adverts for Men's products. Also his wife is the beautiful Aurelie Dupont, and they make a lovely couple. Makes you wonder if their little boy Jacques resembles them. Sorry if I repeated myself here??

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Zoltan Solymosi was also a wonderful Onegin.

&, mercy me, GAWJUSS!!!

Whatever happened to Zoltan Solymosi? Very little info on him about where he is dancing or if he is still dancing. A lot on his brother though. I remember seeing Zoltan with Durante for the Sleeping Beauty. He is an impossibly gorgeous man.

Sorry to quote such an old post, just figured I answer your question (finally?!)

Zoltan taught me in school. He is not dancing anymore, ending his career just after returning to Hungary from the royal ballet. He is teching the male repertoire to youngsters in hungary, and is still able (now being a little heavier than in his days of glory :wink: ) to show them himself!

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Thanks, Hendrik, for answering that question. Because of video (YouTube, etc.) Solymosi still has many fans. It is nice to know that he is passing on his art to young dancers in Hungary.

Regarding the weight issue: I've seen several former male principal dancers coaching who had put on weight. Bart Cook and Ben Huys of NYC Ballet are just two examples. Each of them could still move -- or suggest movement -- speedily and with great clarity. This is certainly a tribute to those years of ballet training.

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Im my opinion, just because someone is a great dancer doesn't mean they're handsome or even good-looking. I loved Julio Bocca as a dancer, but in the looks department I'd classify him as ordinary. I'd say the same of Damien Woetzl. I'd call Angel Corella cute, not handsome. (I know he's been referred to as the "Spanish leprachaun".) I also wouldn't call David Hallberg handsome - nice-looking would be about as far as I'd go. And I saw him up close entering City Center during the Kings of Dance run this February. I think both Jose Manuel Carreno and Marcelo Gomes are gorgeous. I also think Phillip Neal is handsome in a very classical way. And as for hot, I only saw him live once, but Jorge Dunn was the hottest dancer I've ever seen. I had the good fortune of seeing him dance Bolero many years ago, and it was the most excited I've ever been (before or since) at a live performance of any kind.

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I saw Flemming Ryberg for the first time in the documentary "Dancing Bournonville"; he was coaching the kids in "Konservatoriet".

It is a good thing I was sitting at the time: what a beautiful guy. (Even if my heart belongs to Hans Brennaa).

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