Jump to content
This Site Uses Cookies. If You Want to Disable Cookies, Please See Your Browser Documentation. ×

Ray

Senior Member
  • Content Count

    993
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Ray

  • Rank
    Gold Circle

Registration Profile Information

  • Connection to/interest in ballet** (Please describe. Examples: fan, teacher, dancer, writer, avid balletgoer)
    Former dancer
  • City**
    Philadelphia
  • State (US only)**, Country (Outside US only)**
    PA
  1. What I was trying to say is that when we say a piece of writing has certain qualities, we are effectively saying that in writing it the writer was displaying those qualities. For example, when a critic gets off a unkind crack at the expense of a dancer, we don’t just fault his turn of phrase, we fault him. Fair enough, then. I think that JH's epilogue doesn't come from a place of intellectual generosity. If one, like Franko, doesn't think its harsh tone is substantiated by the evidence of the text--a text that in its quasi-academic form promises to offer substantiation--one has to wonder
  2. In defense of Franko, though, Homans opens the door by starting from an autobiographical place. But I actually have to disagree that the criticism here is personal; he's characterizing the writing as nasty/self-indulgent, not the person (he's careful to aim his criticism at the writing throughout, I think). For "unnecessarily harsh and judgmental and personal" I'd look to Macaulay's review of Doug Varone--or any other dance review that launches an ad hominem attack. I don't know how we can separate attitudes in the writing from attitudes of the writer. In my opinion, right or wrong, clear
  3. Interesting also that JH seems to be having a change of heart re Forsythe, as we can see in her most recent essay for the New Republic. Perhaps future editions of the book will include this material.
  4. In defense of Franko, though, Homans opens the door by starting from an autobiographical place. But I actually have to disagree that the criticism here is personal; he's characterizing the writing as nasty/self-indulgent, not the person (he's careful to aim his criticism at the writing throughout, I think). For "unnecessarily harsh and judgmental and personal" I'd look to Macaulay's review of Doug Varone from a few years back--or any other dance review that launches an ad hominem attack.
  5. I don't see that we've discussed Mark Franko's scathing review in TDR (Vol. 56.2, Summer 2012) of Homans's book. From the opening graph: "although impressive for its vast coverage, the book tends to be unreliable in its analysis and contradictory in its methodology. From the geometrical dances of 1581 in Le Ballet Comique de la Reine to Nijinsky’s American tour in 1916, many claims are compromised by the findings of recent scholarship, which the author has apparently not consulted. An agenda drives this chronicle. Jennifer Homans separates the wheat from the chaff of history by distinguishing
  6. Ray

    David Hallberg

    DH will be featured on a segment of PBS Newshour tonight (started at 6 EDT, but probably is repeated at different times in different markets): http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2013/07/dancer-david-hallberg.html
  7. Candycane is Balanchine's version of Russian (aka Trepack). Others might be able to speak to the provenance of that name (i.e., was it something the Mariinsky did during B's lifetime, etc.).
  8. From long overexposure, I have a real, visceral aversion to Russian (Candycane), Chinese (Tea), and Arabian (Coffee) in Nutcracker. And Mother Ginger? Don't get me started. And while they're fun to dance, the Mazurka in Swan Lake Act III is always "close your eyes and listen to the music"-worthy
  9. This isn't quite a blog, but a compendium of articles about ballet and other dance forms, edited by Lisa Kraus (writer for the Phila. Inquirer and former Trisha Brown Dancer)--it's worth checking out: http://thinkingdance.net/ Moderators, relocate this if you need to.
  10. Thanks, but the second part of my message was wrong--I can't even bear to replicate it here!
  11. All the dance training I received was distinctly anti-intellectual: don't think, DO. Everything I learned about dance history and criticism I did on my own. I wonder if that's changed now at all?
  12. Yes--one can cull from one's own collection. And I'm glad he is. Makes me wonder how many others he must have!
  13. Full of wonderful photographs, most of which seem to be culled from former NYCB-er John Clifford's collection.
  14. Unfortunately, in both cases that's Marjorie Spohn. She is in the 1968 Concerto Barocco, with Farrell and Ludlow. DARN IT you are right! SO sorry about that!!!
×
×
  • Create New...