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Interview w. Ratmansky


Drew
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This interview primarily discusses the La Scala production of his Swan Lake (bigger than the Zurich version) and mentions a new Petipa production for New York (ABT I assume) in 2018. Which ballet? "it's a secret:"

http://www.gramilano.com/2016/06/ratmanskys-swan-lake-arrives-bigger-better-la-scala/

Wish the Lincoln Center Festival would consider bringing this to NY (soon)...Surely it's so retro it's kind of hip. Plus Swan Lake...so they know they can sell tickets.

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This interview primarily discusses the La Scala production of his Swan Lake (bigger than the Zurich version) and mentions a new Petipa production for New York (ABT I assume) in 2018. Which ballet? "it's a secret:"

http://www.gramilano.com/2016/06/ratmanskys-swan-lake-arrives-bigger-better-la-scala/

Wish the Lincoln Center Festival would consider bringing this to NY (soon)...Surely it's so retro it's kind of hip. Plus Swan Lake...so they know they can sell tickets.

I'm going to see it next week!!

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Lucky duck -- let us know what you think!

I will try!

I'm not bringing my computer on the trip and am not sure about my internet access (staying mostly with friends) but I'll try and say something!!

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Could Ratmansky be referring to Paquita as the ballet coming to ABT in 2018?

"I will be reconstructing another Petipa ballet in New York" sounds like he's beginning a reconstruction from scratch, rather than one that he's done before...Raymonda?

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He says "There are rumors..."--which is not exactly reporting. I suppose he may know more than he is letting on...

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"I will be reconstructing another Petipa ballet in New York" sounds like he's beginning a reconstruction from scratch, rather than one that he's done before...Raymonda?

YES, please! I hope so!

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He says "There are rumors..."--which is not exactly reporting. I suppose he may know more than he is letting on...

I don't think Macauley would mention this unless he knew something - but that company surely would want to be able to make the official announcement itself.

PNB's current Swan Lake dates to a 1981 production by the previous directors:

https://www.pnb.org/repertorylist/swan-lake/

Doug Fullington of PNB worked with Ratmansky on the La Scala reconstruction. (This was mentioned in reviews, not rumors.)

And Fullington has been in NYC this summer as a fellow of the NYU Center for Ballet and the Arts, giving him more opportunities to consult with Ratmansky? https://balletcenter.nyu.edu/cba/summer-2016-fellows/

SFB's Swan Lake premiered in 2009 and is by their current director, Helgi Tomasson. It was presented in 2016 and is scheduled again for 2017. The timing doesn't seem right to abandon that for a new version.

https://www.sfballet.org/tickets/production/overview/program-6-2017

That history gives us reason to think PNB is at least a strong contender for the Ratmansky reconstruction. I hope it's for their 2017-18 season - I'll be there, for sure!

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PNB's current Swan Lake dates to a 1981 production by the previous directors:

https://www.pnb.org/repertorylist/swan-lake/

Doug Fullington of PNB worked with Ratmansky on the La Scala reconstruction. (This was mentioned in reviews, not rumors.)

And Fullington has been in NYC this summer as a fellow of the NYU Center for Ballet and the Arts, giving him more opportunities to consult with Ratmansky? https://balletcenter.nyu.edu/cba/summer-2016-fellows/

Actually, the current production, which was indeed staged by the previous directors Kent Stowell and Francia Russell, was significantly reworked in 2003, for the opening season of the newly rennovated McCaw Hall. It's based on their previous production, which they first staged in Frankfurtn when they were directors there (pre-Forsythe), and then brought with them to Seattle when they came here in the 1970s. It's got a very distinctive set by Ming Cho Lee -- they would likely have to commission a totally new production if they were to change out the choreography. The company has performed it at least 5 times since the premiere (the last time was 2015) They're adding Maillot's program-length Cendrillon to their rep next year, and are going to have to build out a new home for one of their schools -- not sure how much pre-planning and fundraising they'd have to do to replace their Swan Lake.

Sorry for the geeky moment!

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Actually, the current production, which was indeed staged by the previous directors Kent Stowell and Francia Russell, was significantly reworked in 2003, for the opening season of the newly rennovated McCaw Hall. It's based on their previous production, which they first staged in Frankfurtn when they were directors there (pre-Forsythe), and then brought with them to Seattle when they came here in the 1970s. It's got a very distinctive set by Ming Cho Lee -- they would likely have to commission a totally new production if they were to change out the choreography. The company has performed it at least 5 times since the premiere (the last time was 2015) They're adding Maillot's program-length Cendrillon to their rep next year, and are going to have to build out a new home for one of their schools -- not sure how much pre-planning and fundraising they'd have to do to replace their Swan Lake.

Thanks for this context. It's hard to think of another American company that has the size and wealth to stage the Ratmansky Swan Lake -- Miami? Joffrey? Boston? Houston? Guess we'll have to wait for the official press announcement from the chosen company!

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Thanks for this context. It's hard to think of another American company that has the size and wealth to stage the Ratmansky Swan Lake -- Miami? Joffrey? Boston? Houston? Guess we'll have to wait for the official press announcement from the chosen company!

I love speculation, and it sounds like we'll have some time to indulge in it.

Joffrey does Wheeldon's unusual staging that he first made for the Pennsylvania Ballet -- they premiered it in 2004 and Joffrey took it on in 2014.

It looks like Boston just got a new production in 2014, so I don't think they'd be interested in changing it out quite so soon

Houston does a production by Stanton Welch from 2006 -- it looks like their most recent performances were in 2014.

Miami doesn't seem to have the entire 4 acts in their current repertory -- perhaps they'd be a candidate?

San Francisco is reprising Tommason's production next year, since it was so popular this year. He made it in 2009, so perhaps it's due for an overhaul.

Looking at these options, PNB, Pennsylvania, and Houston have productions that are at least 10 years old -- not sure if that's an indicator...

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Looking at these options, PNB, Pennsylvania, and Houston have productions that are at least 10 years old -- not sure if that's an indicator...

That would be awesome if it was done at PAB. Would make it easy for the NY folks to come down to Philly. Although PAB just performed Swan Lake the year before last, but it may be possible if the reconstruction won't be until 2018.

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PNB also has the Doug Fullington connection.

Ratmansky's "new Petipa reconstruction" hint for ABT could be any of the Harvard note ballets that he has not yet tackled...such as Coppelia? I personally would love to see a ballet that neither he nor any of the other reconstruction experts (like Vikharev, Burlaka, Medvedev or Fullington) have yet tackled in full (Enchanted Forest, Harlequinade, Pharaoh's Daughter). Petipa-Ivanov/ Pugni's Little Humpbacked Horse would be the biggie but Ratmansky has already tackled the story with the inferior Schedrin score (with dopey El Cheapo designs). Shame.

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PNB also has the Doug Fullington connection.

Ratmansky's "new Petipa reconstruction" hint for ABT could be any of the Harvard note ballets that he has not yet tackled...such as Coppelia? I personally would love to see a ballet that neither he nor any of the other reconstruction experts (like Vikharev, Burlaka, Medvedev or Fullington) have yet tackled in full (Enchanted Forest, Harlequinade, Pharaoh's Daughter). Petipa-Ivanov/ Pugni's Little Humpbacked Horse would be the biggie but Ratmansky has already tackled the story with the inferior Schedrin score (with dopey El Cheapo designs). Shame.

Enchanted Forest ? That's one that i have never heard before..Any info?

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Enchanted Forest ? That's one that i have never heard before..Any info?

Here's a little info for starters:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Enchanted_Forest_(ballet)

It's one of the great (highly tuneful) Drigo scores. If you like the Mariinsky's Flora's Awakening, you'll adore this. A very rich and substantial one acter. Ratmansky & Burlaka used some of the music for their Bolshoi Corsaire (Pas of the Fans in A3).

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A clip from the final scene of Swan Lake at Milan

Thank you! Gorgeous! I can't wait to find out which American company will produce this. I'm still hoping for PNB. Among other things, that company offers a rich array of complementary events -- pre- and post-conversations for the audience with every performance, dress rehearsals, interviews with the choreographer. And they offer these over the long opening weekend, so it's worth a trip for out-of-towners.

And this is a reminder of how threadbare ABT's final act is. The only advantage ABT has: giving Marcelo an opportunity to show off his glorious swan dive into the lake.

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I wonder about the acting style in both the Sleeping Beauty and Swan Lake reconstructions by Ratmansky. It fits in with 2016 acting and when you look at 1920s poses, 1930s silent films, 1940s and 50s acting was more stylized and not realistic like 2016. So I have my doubts acting in ballet in imperial times was this realistic even though I wasn't there.

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I wonder about the acting style in both the Sleeping Beauty and Swan Lake reconstructions by Ratmansky. It fits in with 2016 acting and when you look at 1920s poses, 1930s silent films, 1940s and 50s acting was more stylized and not realistic like 2016. So I have my doubts acting in ballet in imperial times was this realistic even though I wasn't there.

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