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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Affects the Ballet World


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Also from the article about the Bolshoi above....

“The Russian government recently announced aid of 3.8 billion rubles [$50 million approx.] to support culture. Mr. Urin tells it that "everything will be fine" and that his theater has enough reserves to survive.”

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An excellent article from Dance/USA:

Leadership During Crisis: Kelly Tweeddale, Executive Director, San Francisco Ballet

https://www.danceusa.org/ejournal/2020/05/11/leadership-during-crisis-kelly-tweeddale-executive-director-san-francisco-ballet

"Looking forward, Tweeddale said, “We’ve set very clear goals for what we’re doing right now. I will say in 2008 [during the financial crisis] at other organizations, I vowed after that experience to never let the balance sheet lead the conversation, because when the balance sheet and the financial sheet lead the conversation, you lose touch with your mission. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to pay attention. There’s reality about what you can afford to do.” The question became: “How do we lead the organization through this so that we have something on the other side that is committed to the art form? It has to be more than ‘just how much money will we lose?’”

To that end, scenarios to support the dancers have been paramount. While Tweeddale noted that many arts organizations worry about how to get audiences back in theaters, “We are starting with how do we get the artists back into the studio so they can at least take company class so that they don’t lose their entire careers. We want to be ready when the time comes to create again..."

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On 5/16/2020 at 8:57 PM, Buddy said:

 

Also from the article about the Bolshoi above....

“The Russian government recently announced aid of 3.8 billion rubles [$50 million approx.] to support culture. Mr. Urin tells it that "everything will be fine" and that his theater has enough reserves to survive.”

And here, people complained that the Kennedy Center was getting relief. I have to remind people that cultural centers, performing arts, museums, public gardens, theaters, opera etc..these are major employers. And contribute greatly to the economic welfare of their cities/towns and various industries. 

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The  Joyce Theater just cancelled the engagement of the Sarasota Ballet, scheduled for August 18-23. Here's the e-mamil they just sent.

...Due to the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, and continued uncertainty regarding public gatherings, performances of The Sarasota Ballet have been cancelled.

The Joyce is providing current ticket holders with the following options:

  1. Donate your ticket
  2. Request a refund of your ticket purchase

If we do not hear from you by the scheduled opening on August 18, we will automatically refund your tickets. If you would like to make a donation to the company you were scheduled to see, please request a refund and visit the company's website to make your contribution.

 

The Joyce Box Office phone lines are very busy at this time. For the best service, please use this ... to select your choice from the options above. We appreciate your patience in processing these requests.

In these rare and difficult times, we truly appreciate your investment in New York City’s rich arts and culture organizations. As a valued member of our Joyce family, you can understand the financial impact of these changes on our dance community at large. We ask you to consider donating your ticket as support during this time.
 

The Joyce will continue to monitor the situation as well as seek guidance and best practices from the appropriate health authorities and communicate any updates to our patrons. Please visit The Joyce website for immediate updates regarding performances.

 

Stay tuned, and thank you for your support! 

 

joyce-logo-gradient2.png
The Joyce Theater Foundation, Inc. 175 Eighth Avenue, New York, NY 10011

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The Wolf Trap has officially cancelled their entire summer season. This means that in addition to the previously announced visits by the Hong Kong Ballet (Alice in Wonderland) and Riverdance, the Richmond Ballet's production of Carmina Burana has also been cancelled. Other noteworthy cancellations include a production of Eugene Onegin and a multi-media performance of The Planets with the National Symphony Orchestra.

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15 minutes ago, YouOverThere said:

According to a New York Times article, the Mark Morris Dance Group and the (Benjamin Millepied's) L.A. Dance Project have both stated that they are not planning any performances for the remainder of 2020.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/24/arts/reopening-dance-music-theater-virus.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&fbclid=IwAR3VbQ21r_NKmpOZw6ZwSYADd2FA

Very gloomy. In New Zealand, which seems to be leading the planet in getting a grip on COVID-19, the Ballet is hoping to perform in their country starting August 20.

https://www.broadwayworld.com/new-zealand/article/Royal-New-Zealand-Ballet-Company-Rehearses-on-Zoom-Hopes-to-Return-to-Performing-Soon-20200524

It makes you wonder why Segerstrom hasn't cancelled anything past May 31! For those of us with tickets to LaScala in late July, it would be nice if they'd get on with what seems to be inevitable. Instead, they are still selling tickets!  https://www.scfta.org/

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23 minutes ago, California said:

It makes you wonder why Segerstrom hasn't cancelled anything past May 31!

I tried buying tickets for a few shows in June and was not able to, so apparently June shows are cancelled even if there isn't a banner on their website. For shows involving the Pacific Symphony, the ticket page does state that the Pacific Symphony has cancelled all their June shows.

Edited by YouOverThere
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The Toronto-based chamber orchestra Tafelmusik is creating a pay per view online concert series, with the first performance this evening (5/27). The wave of the future?

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Whim W'him a contemporary dance company in Seattle, founded and led by former PNB Principal Dancer, has announced a digital season for 2020-2011.  Quinn Wharton will be filming the new works for the season.  

Their model is a hybrid subscription model -- $120/year or $12/mo -- for the three performances plus extras or $5-$50 for each filmed performance.  I am so excited about this, and I look forward to see the choices that the choreographers, dancers, and Wharton make.

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Opera Colorado just announced that its performances scheduled for November 2020 will be performed in late June 2021. The rest of the season will open in February 2021. They perform in the same Opera House used by the Colorado Ballet. I'm hoping they can reschedule their October Giselle to late spring, but nothing has been announced.

 

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Not ballet, but I got a "return" survey from the National Nordic Museum on the conditions under which i would return.   Eight or so basic questions -- When am I planning to return, select from a list of things they could do to make me feel safe, have I watched any of their digital content, etc. -- and age(s) of people in my household (how many by range).

And I gave them the same response I gave to the ballet:  video until vaccine, and that my feeling safe was not under their control.

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No surprise, but Segerstrom Center for the Performing Arts just cancelled the La Scala performances July 31-August 2.

Performances of Teatro alla Scala Ballet's Onegin
 Have Been Canceled!

Dear Ticket Holder,

Segerstrom Center for the Arts considers the health and wellbeing of our patrons, artists and staff to be our top priority. Amid ongoing orders from the State and County health agencies relating to the COVID-19 virus, Segerstrom Center’s presentation of Teatro alla Scala Ballet's Onegin, originally scheduled for July 31st - August 2nd, 2020, has been cancelled.

If you have tickets to this show, please visit our website to see your ticket options by next Wednesday, June 3rd to let us know what you would like to do with your tickets. After this date, if we have not heard from you, your purchase will be converted to an account credit that you can use for any future purchase.

Please note that credits and refunds are only available for tickets purchased directly through the presenter. Segerstrom Center is not responsible for the refund practices put in place by secondary ticket providers.

Our box office and administration offices are closed until further notice. For any other questions, please email the box office at BoxOffice@SCFTA.org.

Thank you,

Segerstrom Center for the Arts

 

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8 hours ago, abatt said:

Met Opera has cancelled all shows in the fall.  The plan is to reopen on Dec 31 with a gala.

And since the artists haven't been paid since March, things could get dicey fast.

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In the new schedule Met is also dropping some new productions for the time being, but performing the operas in the current productions, postponing some other new productions, performing during a previously scheduled dark period -- Boheme, Traviata, Carmen -- and Brenda Rae gets to sing Rosina instead of Lulu.

https://www.metopera.org/user-information/2020-21-season-update/

The Met can't keep people onhold indefinitely, and Europe is already opening up sports-wise and travel-wise, even if in a limited way. 

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On 6/1/2020 at 6:07 PM, abatt said:

Met Opera has cancelled all shows in the fall.  The plan is to reopen on Dec 31 with a gala.

I wonder what they are expecting will happen in December that will allow them to open.

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My guesses are:

1. A summer of people going outside and getting a lot out of their system, hopefully in a healthy way.

2. Gradual reopening plans work without the expected second spike in the Fall.  (Pipe dream, in my opinion, but it's built into the entire idea of re-opening plans.)

3. Definitive science that says that if you've been exposed/ill, test positive for antibodies, and are past a period in which you won't expose others to the virus, you can start going out freely in public.  (The South Korean team that originally said that people were testing positive after getting the virus clarified that they were finding dead, not live virus in post-illness testing.) This would assume some kind of proof of the above to get into venues.

While the third wouldn't necessarily mean that the audience could be back in force, it might mean that singers can perform, and their performances can be streamed.  I don't know how successful the Vienna State Opera model has been financially and whether it's been subsidized/relies on sponsorship, but their model is to stream many live performances a year over the internet. with a short period for subscribers to get it in their preferred time zone, and then they go into the vault, where subscribers get a small number of on demand performances from the vault/month, and beyond that, "rentals" for a smaller fee.  There's also an on-demand, per stream fee.

I would do that for the Met, even it if it was less frequent, and even if the cinema streams weren't available at home, so that the loyal movie theaters aren't cut out of the deal entirely.  The Met on Demand model isn't appealing to me, although it is to lots of people.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Helene said:

3. Definitive science that says that if you've been exposed/ill, test positive for antibodies, and are past a period in which you won't expose others to the virus, you can start going out freely in public.  (The South Korean team that originally said that people were testing positive after getting the virus clarified that they were finding dead, not live virus in post-illness testing.) This would assume some kind of proof of the above to get into venues.

If they start allowing people who test positive for antibodies to do things that the rest can't, there's a huge risk of a lot of coronavirus parties (as well as a large market in fraudulent certifications) since people lacking (proof of) antibodies will perceive themselves to be at a social and/or economic disadvantage. That could be disastrous.

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Social and economic discrepancies and disadvantages are already built into the plans: who can go out, which jobs can be done, how businesses can operate, including table service vs. pick-up and delivery.   And so will the phasing of a vaccine, once it's manufactured.

There are already antibodies tests that are available in some markets.  If people are already in violation by meeting in bars in close contact and pools in close contact and there are no civil or criminal repercussions for this behavior, even if the science bears out that only someone with the right results can't get the virus but could still be a carrier, the history of the Spanish Flu shows that people will behave in ways that are deadly to themselves and others around them, and I don't know why this will be any different. 

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A December 31 gala reopening seems highly improbable to me. I don't think opera will be back onstage in any normal way (e.g. choruses rehearsing and performing together, soloists within ~15 feet of one another, etc.) until there is a vaccine and/or significant developments in treatment — to the point where, for a large proportion of the population, COVID-19 is as treatable as the flu. 

32 minutes ago, Helene said:

My guesses are:

1. A summer of people going outside and getting a lot out of their system, hopefully in a healthy way.

2. Gradual reopening plans work without the expected second spike in the Fall.  (Pipe dream, in my opinion, but it's built into the entire idea of re-opening plans.)

3. Definitive science that says that if you've been exposed/ill, test positive for antibodies, and are past a period in which you won't expose others to the virus, you can start going out freely in public.  (The South Korean team that originally said that people were testing positive after getting the virus clarified that they were finding dead, not live virus in post-illness testing.) This would assume some kind of proof of the above to get into venues.

While the third wouldn't necessarily mean that the audience could be back in force, it might mean that singers can perform, and their performances can be streamed...

I'm not sure I understand #1. How does a summer of getting outside make opera in the theater more feasible?

Reopening plans, no matter how gradual, are going to hit a point beyond which things just can't progress until there are significant developments in widespread rapid testing, contact tracing, and especially treatment — and, ultimately, a vaccine. I don't think things will ever be fully normal until we have the last of those, or at least a very good form of the second-to-last.

#3 would seem to mean that only singers/choristers who have had COVID-19 could continue with their professional careers — which, as @YouOverThere suggests, is highly problematic. It's also a big if that people who've had it would both (a) not be able to be reinfected (reasonably likely) and (b) not be able to carry and infect others (not quite as likely, as I understand it). And trying to put together a schedule of performances — which they'd need to start planning for now, or at least by this fall — seems like a logistical mess, if only performers who've had the virus (and come out of it in good shape) could be slotted in.

Edited by nanushka
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