Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Natasha Richardson, R.I.P.


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#16 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,266 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 05:25 PM

Life...
Rest in peace, Ms. Richardson.

#17 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,258 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 06:33 PM

Like many of you, I've been sad about this all day. Like Makarova Fan, I remember her debut on "Sherlock Holmes" -- she was one of the most exciting contemporary actresses, I think.

#18 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,266 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 07:53 PM

...and then, the inevitable "why"...(I know, I know...but still... :D )

#19 4mrdncr

4mrdncr

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 670 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 08:22 PM

I am so very very saddened by this. I know firsthand what her family must be going through having had many sudden deaths in my own family over the last few years. Both my heart and mind goes out to them, and all those touched by her personally and professionally.

(A small aside:) In one of the online articles I read today, the author said "the show-biz wand tapped her" after she saw her mother in the film Camelot. The article goes on to quote Ms. Richardson as saying, "I still look at that movie and can't believe it. It still makes me cry, the beauty of it." This had much resonance with me, because of all the movies I saw as a small child, that was the one that made the deepest impression, and for a similar reason: I thought it was the most beautiful and in some ways profound film I had seen. I'm not the biggest fan of musicals, but that one stuck. And it was why I started paying attention to the Redgrave dynasty.

I will always respect and regard them all for their talent and devotion to enhancing the quality of life of many less fortunate.
My deepest sympathy to them all.


PS. Why has no one mentioned her half-brother Carlo? (And cousin Gemma who is/was also an actress?)

#20 Marga

Marga

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 10:41 PM

I add my condolences to her family. This hits hard in that it is so sudden and doesn't seem to make sense.
I feel for her young children who had to lose their mother so tragically and with no preparation. As a mother who had to anguish, years ago, over what it would be like for my children to be motherless (because of what I have, I was told to prepare for my demise), my heart cries for them.

#21 Dale

Dale

    Emeralds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,054 posts

Posted 19 March 2009 - 06:41 AM

Like many of you, I've been sad about this all day. Like Makarova Fan, I remember her debut on "Sherlock Holmes" -- she was one of the most exciting contemporary actresses, I think.


I feel the same way. Just the suddenness and strangeness of what happened - it's really stuck in my brain. So sad. I remember during a "British phase" I was in, reading about her staring in High Society in London. She looked so beautiful and graceful in the photos I saw in Tattler, that I really longed to see the show. I'm sorry I didn't see her on the stage here in NY but I remember her as far back as The Comfort of Strangers - a very odd film. I saw it for Rupert Everett, but she was the best thing in it. The camera just loved her face and she had, as I put it earlier in the thread, that amazing Redgrave voice.

#22 richard53dog

richard53dog

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts

Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:37 AM

So sad. I remember during a "British phase" I was in, reading about her staring in High Society in London. She looked so beautiful and graceful in the photos I saw in Tattler, that I really longed to see the show.



Dale, funny...well no I guess it's not really funny...that you mentioned High Society. Just by coincidence I happened to be in London during that run and saw Richardson in it. She was still very young but had a wonderful stage presence.

#23 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 19 March 2009 - 01:40 PM

I have the same disbelief that I felt when Princess Diana died -- the inexplicability of such a vital, beautiful, "magical" person simply perishing.

I enjoyed Richardson's world-worn Sally Bowes, but mostly I remember with pleasure an interview she gave Charlie Rose. He asked some silly, Rosian question about her fitness routine and gym attendance. She smiled, perhaps wanting to pursue other topics, and said, "You know, Charlie. We go to the same gym!"

The family lives in the building across the street from me. When I was last outside, there were a few photographers sitting in parked cars, a tripod with a video cam standing at the ready. It's just this side of discreet, but then again, no relatives were passing in or out at the time.

My sympathies go to them, the family. As we go through life, we learn how the world can change in an instant, but those boys seem too young to have to absorb that cruel lesson.

#24 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 19 March 2009 - 02:30 PM

An appreciation by Michael Phillips in The Chicago Tribune.

.......At her best, when her uneven film career allowed it—the greatest triumphs came on the London and New York stage—her theatrical chops brought something extra to the role at hand, something that said: This is play-acting. But I'm playing it for real.

Often stuck in suffocating roles onscreen, she breathed more easily in the theater. Co-starring with her future husband Liam Neeson in a 1993 Broadway revival of O'Neill's "Anna Christie," Richardson conquered a hugely difficult role, full of stereotyped Minnesota dialect and whore-with-gold-heart pitfalls. I still remember the big, whiskey-soaked rasp of a voice she brought to that portrayal. The voice was the key—the way into a nearly unplayable cliche's beating heart.



#25 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 01 March 2014 - 04:50 AM

An interview with Liam Neeson, where he speaks about the death of Richardson. He notes that several of her organs were donated.

Anderson Cooper: But at that point you didn't think that there was any hope?

 

Liam Neeson: She and I had made a pact. If any of us got into a vegetative state that we'd pull the plug. You know? So when I saw her and saw all these tubes and stuff, that was my immediate thought. Was, "OK, these tubes have to go. She's gone." But donated three of her organs, so she's keeping three people alive at the moment. Yeah. Her heart, her kidneys and her liver.

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):