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Companies/Organizations with Specific Plans for Reopening


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I'm starting this topic for companies/organizatins who have stated plans for in-person performances that go beyond "We've cancelled XYZ, but plan to continue with our [ABC] program in 2021.

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Ballet West sent out a press release today that includes changes to their original season programming, but also:

1. Plans for social distance seating, which includes a note at then end of the release that many performances will be sold out because of this, and that subscribers get first dibs.

2. Additional performances of the season opening mixed-bill program (November 2020) and The Nutcracker scheduled.

Here's the full release:

BALLET WEST UPDATES 20/21 SEASON    

 

Salt Lake City, UT— Ballet West is committed to moving forward with the Company’s 57th season in the most safe and strategic way possible for our dancers, staff, and audiences. Though the season will look different from that which was announced in February, the Company is eager to return to the stage. Working with guidelines established by the State of Utah and Salt Lake County, Ballet West will return for its 20/21 season with a robust repertory with precautions to protect the health of our patrons.

Regarding the reworked season, Artistic Director Adam Sklute said, “When I announced this season in January, I said it would be one of the most exciting and ambitious to date for Ballet West. That statement is even more true today and I am inspired by the resilience and commitment of our staff, dancers, and patrons who passionately want to return to live performances.”

Originally, Ben Stevenson’s Dracula was scheduled to open the season. However, due to anticipated social distancing protocol, the production is being postponed until next season. Patron Services will contact current season subscribers with the option to donate, refund, or exchange their Dracula tickets for a gift certificate.

The Company has added two performances to the triple bill season opener, headlined by Twyla Tharp’s Nine Sinatra Songs (November 6-14) . The program opens with a world premiere by Jennifer Archibald, Resident Choreographer of Cincinnati Ballet. A graduate of The Alvin Ailey School, her work is known for its fierce and athletic movement, as audiences witnessed when she presented her world premiere work, Myoho at Ballet West’s Choreographic Festival in 2018. Archibald’s new creation is followed by Ballet West’s Resident Choreographer Nicolo Fonte’s Almost Tango, a ballet that highlights his unique take on the passionate style of the Argentinean dance of the same name. Like Fonte’s Carmina Burana, Rite of Spring, and Fox on the Doorstep, Almost Tango speaks to the soul with both joy and heartache. Finally, Tharp’s 1982 Nine Sinatra Songs returns to Ballet West’s stage for the first time since 2008 when the company premiered it as part of Sklute’s first full season. Considered a classic of late 20th century choreography, Tharp combines her unique blend of classical ballet, modern dance, and ballroom to invoke an elegant and playful look at relationships. Featuring costumes designed by Oscar de la Renta, seven glamorous couples dance to the cashmere voice of Frank Sinatra, as Tharp finds the sensuality, humor, and profundity in “Old Blue Eye’s” music.

The Company has added several performances to the The Nutcracker production to allow for greater social distancing (December 4-26). More than three quarters of a century after Ballet West’s founder Willam Christensen choreographed it, America’s first Nutcracker looks as fresh and relevant as it did the day it opened. Today, it is as emblematic of the holidays as Christmas trees or menorahs. Artistic Director Adam Sklute has been recognized recently in The New York Times and on NPR for his updates to the Chinese variation, by working with the Christensen family to interpolate Mr. C’s brother Lew’s divertissement and adjusting the make-up to create a greater celebration of Chinese culture.

After a long hiatus, Michael Smuin’s Romeo and Juliet (February 12-20) returns to Ballet West. Smuin was an early student of Willam Christensen and became distinguished in his own right – first as a principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre and the San Francisco Ballet, later as co-artistic director of the San Francisco Ballet alongside Lew Christensen, and finally as founder of his eponymous ballet company. Smuin’s dynamic Romeo and Juliet is an energetic version of Shakespeare’s epic and beloved story. Deeply human, it is conveyed through emotive choreography and Sergei Prokofiev’s dramatic score.

Another adjustment to the season will be the delay in presenting Jerome Robbin’s Glass Pieces, Justin Peck’s Belles-Lettres, and Agnes de Mille’s Rodeo. The Company has elected to proceed with--what was supposed to be the final program of 56th season--Bolero and The Dream (April 9-17). Buoyant and boisterous, this double bill features Sir Frederick Ashton’s charming and hilarious retelling of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream as well as Resident Choreographer Nicolo Fonte’s acclaimed Bolero, with Ravel’s pulsating score leading the charge.

Ballet West’s Choreographic Festival (May 6-8) will showcase an exciting first time collaboration between two Utah arts icons, the Sundance Institute and Ballet West. Principal Artist Emily Adams and Katy Jarzebowski, an alumna of Sundance Institute’s Music Film Program have been commissioned by Ballet West to create a new ballet with original choreography and a music score for a world premiere work. Also, moving from the fall program to the Festival stage is Return to a Strange Land, choreographed by Jiří Kylián in 1975 as an elegy to his mentor, the late John Cranko. The ballet, an exploration of Kylián’s own grief, features a stage strewn with autumn leaves as dancers move seamlessly through powerful architectural movements, accompanied by a haunting solo piano composition by Leoš Janáček.

In addition to the mainstage season, Ballet West will celebrate 10 years of the Family Classics Series with the staging of The Little Mermaid (April 23-24). This one-hour family-friendly ballet will be performed by Ballet West II and students of the Ballet West Academy. The Family Classics Series includes guided narration to help viewers follow the action on stage. Conceived by Artistic Director Adam Sklute and choreographed by Principal Ballet Master Pamela Robinson Harris and Peggy Dolkas, former Associate Director of Ballet West II, audiences are welcomed into a watery world that follows Hans Christian Andersen’s story of a brave mermaid in search of true love.

“The arts tell our story. They allow us to feel human and connect us to one another,” said Sklute. “I believe our community needs to come together more than ever. The arts allow us to process suffering and heartache, as well as hope and redemption. This season is filled with stories that will inspire us, make us laugh, make us cry, and encapsulate the emotions of humanity allowing some solace and even levity for our audiences. I look forward to coming back together again in a safe and healthy way to share the human experience.”

 

Due to physically distanced seating, many performances are nearly sold out. Stay informed by signing up for the Ballet West email list at www.balletwest.org. Single tickets do not go on sale until September, so patrons are encouraged to subscribe or renew their season subscriptions now. Three-ballet packages begin at just $63. Contact Ballet West at 801-869-6920 or visit www.balletwest.org.

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Seattle Symphony has announced their intended phased approach (via email).  Here's a big excerpt:

As we look ahead to the start of our 2020–2021 season, we are carefully developing ways to share brand-new live performances with you. Several phased reopening scenarios are being developed in accordance with Governor Inslee's Safe Start Washington plan. Each scenario will provide the great music you love, while ensuring a safe experience for our audiences, musicians and staff.

  • Phase 2:  Performances on stage will be limited to small, socially distanced ensembles featuring Symphony musicians. Performances will not have an in-person audience, but will be livestreamed for at-home viewing.

  • Phase 3: Performances on stage will feature socially distanced programs by the orchestra with featured guest artists. Performances will not have an in-person audience, but will be livestreamed for at-home viewing.

  • Phase 4: Performances on stage will feature socially distanced programs by the orchestra with featured guest artists. Benaroya Hall opens for limited-capacity, socially distanced seating and livestream access continues for at-home viewing.

 

After a technologically rocky start, Seattle Chamber Music Society, which is a summer performance series, launched its first live-streamed performance this past Monday.  The season is a combination of small in-person chamber performances streamed from SCMS's new space (the "Living Room") and remote performances.  They sold subscription packages for access to live concerts and then on demand streaming until sometime in August.

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The Mariinsky II (the new theatre) and the much smaller Concert Hall are being used. The seating arrangement is every other seat.

All Events July 11-26

https://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/playbill/?w=0&year=2020&month=7

Nothing in August.

Ballet Sept-Feb.

https://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/nextplaybill/?type=ballet

 

Here’s Maria Khoreva & Vladimir Shklyarov. Welcome back !  -- Although they look like they've never left.

 

“Sleeping Beauty - for the FIRST TIME in the world, after almost four months of quarantine, the Mariinsky Theater is giving a ballet concert. It is not yet a full-size performance, but a concert of separate fragments from different ballet performances, including my favourite Sleeping Beauty. The Adagio from Sleeping Beauty is not the easiest thing to dance at the first ballet concert, but Vladimir Shklyarov and I were given this wonderful opportunity and it's super.”

 

Edited by Buddy
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The Vienna State Opera has published audience guidelines for its new season, scheduled to begin on September 7th. While they include notes on reduced seating and requests to use hand sanitizer, there are no mask requirements. 

https://www.wiener-staatsoper.at/en/service/covid-19-information/

The schedule for September consists of full-blown, evening-length productions: Madama Butterfly, Elektra, Simon Boccanegra, L'elisir d'amore, La Fille du régiment, Don Carlos [!]. The first ballet scheduled is Jewels on September 24th.

Edited by volcanohunter
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National Ballet of Japan will open its doors on July 24th with a new ballet for children, "Ryuuguu The Turtle Princess" based on a Japanese folk tale. 

https://www.nntt.jac.go.jp/english/productions/ballet/ballet-for-children-the-turtle-princess.html

It is a full length contemporary ballet with intermission (2 hours long) and will be performed at the Opera theatre with reduced seating.  

Here are the audience guidelines for prevention. The tickets were already on sale before the pandemic, but they asked the customers to return their tickets and put the tickets on sale later to meet the seating guidelines. (one empty seat on front and sides) 

https://www.nntt.jac.go.jp/english/news/all/important-notice-our-prevention-plan-and-request.html

The New National Theatre has already started with the drama performances last week in the Playhouse.

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Here's part of the description of what the Mariinsky has in mind. It's worth noting that there will be no events from July 27 until September 14, which I believe is the normal vacation time anyway. A new feature will be the broadcasting of live events.

The wisdom of reopening at this time can be debated and probably will be for a long time. I would have to attribute much of it to the indomitable resolve of Valerie Gergiev. ("....the Mariinsky Theatre is the first to have resolved to present a ballet gala for its audiences after such a lengthy break.") The allowing of almost two months between the  approximately two weeks of reopening and the resumption of normal programming seems like a very good idea. It has given the artists a chance to get their feet back on the ground and will allow time to assess the outcome and plan for the future. I wish them much success.

"Choreographic miniatures, scenes from ballet classics and contemporary works will be performed by Ekaterina Kondaurova, Oxana Skorik, Alina Somova, Viktoria Tereshkina, Olesya Novikova, Maria Khoreva, Maria Ilyushkina, Timur Askerov, Anderi Yermakov, Kimin Kim, Xander Parish, Vladimir Shklyarov, Konstantin Zverev and Alexander Sergeyev among others. For the company, these performances will be of particular importance as the dancers have not appeared on the stage for more than three months, and the Mariinsky Theatre is the first to have resolved to present a ballet gala for its audiences after such a lengthy break.

"All events are to be held at the Mariinsky II, where particular health and safety measures will be employed; these have been developed in collaboration with Russia's Consumer Protection Association. Moreover, the number of seats available is limited to 1,000, with patrons being seated in a chessboard pattern and the use of means of individual protection will be a prerequisite throughout the audience being present in the building.

"In returning to performances on the stage, the Mariinsky Theatre plans gradually to reduce the number of online screenings of recordings, which since 19 March have received almost a hundred million hits, and to broadcast live events. Today at 19.00 Moscow Time on mariinsky.tv and via the theatre's social networking sites it will be possible to see a live broadcast of Iolanta.

http://www.mariinsky.ru/en/news1/2020/7/07_1/

(thank to Sophia at Dansomanie)

Edited by Buddy
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The current Mariinsky season has be extended about two weeks to August 6 in the new theater and the smaller concert hall. The old theater reopens next Saturday, August 1, with an opera. A ballet gala will be held there Sunday, August 2. Two more online live orchestra broadcasts are scheduled for today and tomorrow. For now, the next ballet season will begin the same, September 17.

http://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/playbill/?year=2020&month=7

The small Palladium Theatre in London had a trial performance this week. All viewers are being monitored for their health afterwards. Seems like a good idea for all theaters that are reopening.

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There has been a non-peer-reviewed study reported by major news outlets over the last few days that suggests six groups of symptoms, and one is a no-fever flavor.  Relying on temperature checks -- I'd be > 3 degrees over normal and still pass -- perhaps they should use smell tests instead as the primary way to test health since loss of smell is common.  (And use temperature as a secondary, for those who usually have no sense of smell.)

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Seriously?   I don't smell well because I have allergies and take meds and, as a post menopausal woman, I get hot too.  

The risks to basic civil rights are increasingly emerging.  

You can't smell a cherry jelly bean and so now you can't work? 

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8 minutes ago, balletforme said:

You can't smell a cherry jelly bean and so now you can't work?

My post was in response to "All viewers," and I'm not sure what constitution or country has an all-encompassing right to attend a live performance.

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National Ballet of Japan has successfully premiered their new ballet for Children "Ryuguu the Turtle Princess" 

There were many social distancing measures at the theatre, but as you can see by the clip, it is quite a large scale production and has some partnering, I did see 2 performances, and the concept, dramaturgy and costumes, sets were excellent. And there were some Noh (Japanese traditional theatre) and Kabuki influence which gives depth to the story and visuals although this is a production aimed for children and families. I am sure it will be very interesting and intriguing for adults as well.

https://twitter.com/nntt_ballet/status/1287986575343644677?s=20

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By no means a full re-opening, Christina Scheppelmann, General Director of Seattle Opera, just sent out an email, and this was in it:

Seattle Center has transformed the McCaw Hall stage to the Seattle Center Studio, a fully equipped video studio for center organizations to use for live streaming and on demand recordings. Seattle Opera was the inaugural user, testing the technology when we recorded Seattleite Shelly Traverse’s Songs of Summer recital, which I hope you were able to watch. You can imagine we are excited to be back in the hall, taking advantage of the wonderful acoustics. This is an excellent opportunity for us to think about future uses of the studio over the next several months.

From the Seattle Center website: "Seattle Center is operated by a city department that is also called Seattle Center. This department plays multiple roles as a business partner, financier, landlord, custodian, event producer and promoter."

McCaw Hall is where Pacific Northwest Ballet performs, too.  This is great news and a great investment, and I'm hoping that when dancers are able to get together, that at least the smaller ballets will be able to be streamed from the stage.  I also hope that the space can be shared a bit more broadly than usual, where it's not cost effective for anything without a big crowd.

 

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The Bolshoi — An announcement of its reopening in September

The first ballet performance in Moscow will take place on September, 12: “Don Quixote” in choreographic version by Alexei Fadeyechev will be shown this evening to doctors who selflessly save people's lives.

On September 6, 8 and 10, “Don Carlo” opera starring Anna Netrebko, Ildar Abdrazakov, Yusif Eyvazov, Agunda Kulayeva, Elchin Azizov will open our 245th season on the Historic stage.

Despite many difficulties, in the 245th season we are going to present 3 ballet and 7 opera premieres, festivals, concerts in the Philharmonic, tours to Europe and South America (Argentina), and host the international Yuri Grigorovich ballet Competition on our stages. Everything that The Bolshoi did not manage to implement due to lockdown in 244th season will be implemented in the next 2 years.

https://www.bolshoi.ru/en/

(Thanks to Sophia at Dansomanie for her summary alert)

And for anyone who wants to attempt this schedule of performances in russian.  (“БАЛЕТ” = Ballet)

https://www.bolshoi.ru/upload/medialibrary/6ae/6ae1d18ff659952e8eb34e0a36955468.pdf

(Thanks to I.N.A. at Balletfriends)

Google translate

https://translate.google.com

Edited by Buddy
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Unfortunately the Bolshoi Japan tour expected this November~December is cancelled. 

https://www.japanarts.co.jp/en/news/p5214/

Quote

We regret to inform you that, after through discussions with the Bolshoi Theatre, Bolshoi Ballet Japan Tour 2020 (a total of 13 performances in Tokyo, Otsu, Maebashi, and Osaka), scheduled for  November 23 to December 6, has been unavoidably cancelled in view of the international circumstance as well as the domestic situation resulting from the worldwide spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

 

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The Mariinsky, which is starting performances again this weekend, has returned to checkerboard seating for September, rather than no spacing between seats, which was originally posted. I think that this is a better idea, although it's just a personal feeling based on little scientific knowledge. I also would still be more comfortable with the distribution and required use of quality face masks, but again just a personal opinion. Also monitoring audience health afterwards (perhaps by telephone) would seem a very responsible thing to do, perhaps having worldwide importance. The Mariinsky is the first ballet theater to attempt full scale resumption, so the performing arts world will probably be watching very carefully. 

There will be a space of a week between the two limited performers events this weekend and the full scale resumption September 17 with Romeo and Juliet. Then there will be another week before more closely dated performances begin.

Schedule:

https://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/nextplaybill/?type=ballet

One more time, a personal opinion, that all this is something that we'll have to feel our way through, hopefully, as responsibly and positively as possible. And, hopefully, things will much improve, sooner rather than later.

 
 

Edited by Buddy
typo corrections
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The limited performer events such as the "galas" (one or two dancers on stage at a time) that the Mariinsky has been doing, seem to be getting more support. In an article in russian, Vadim Muntagirov, Royal Ballet (England) Principal dancer says,        

"But [Royal Ballet] said that they would be able to fill the hall completely and plan large three-act ballets only in March 2021. Before that, there will probably only be small one-act ballets, where there are as few artists as possible on the stage - such as "Appolo" or "A Month in the Country". 

https://chayka.lv/2020/09/01/vadim-muntagirov/?cn-reloaded=1&fbclid=IwAR3wjlIKpDVwUCr7Sn3v9oH7jmRPLpnD0-IgcH974CLE1EMPXUfPeYXPTZM
(Thanks to Oncnp at BalletcoForum)

Added thought:

I personally like Galas. Maybe this might be a chance for some of the corps de ballet dancers to have a 'moment of glory' as well. Also it's maybe a chance to experiment somewhat without having to make a major commitment.


 

Edited by Buddy
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On 7/28/2020 at 8:57 AM, naomikage said:

National Ballet of Japan has successfully premiered their new ballet for Children "Ryuguu the Turtle Princess" 

There were many social distancing measures at the theatre, but as you can see by the clip, it is quite a large scale production and has some partnering, I did see 2 performances, and the concept, dramaturgy and costumes, sets were excellent. And there were some Noh (Japanese traditional theatre) and Kabuki influence which gives depth to the story and visuals although this is a production aimed for children and families. I am sure it will be very interesting and intriguing for adults as well.

https://twitter.com/nntt_ballet/status/1287986575343644677?s=20

This is interesting, Naomikage. Thank you. Is the company active now ?

Here's a longer look posted by the company. I think that it's quite charming and I like the cross cultural styling.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgGXnNOlAKc
 

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Thank you Buddy. This was a sweet production.  Unfortunately one of the staff got COVID-19 positive and the last two performances were cancelled, but no dancers have tested positive and they are back in the studio preparing for the new season which will start in mid October. 

It is the first season for the new AD Miyako Yoshida former Royal Ballet principal. It was supposed to open with Peter Wright's Swan Lake that will enter the repertoire, but for travel restrictions, it was postponed and they will do Don Quixote instead. Still, a full length classical ballet.

Japan is still struggling, we have like 600 hundred new cases every day, but performances are slowly resuming with social distancing measures. Kabuki has been back since August. 

But because of the travel ban. many tours have been cancelled, such as Bolshoi Ballet, Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, Bejart Ballet Lausanne. 

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