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Pronunciation of Ballet Names


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#61 Guest_nycdog_*

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 03:03 PM

Umm, perhaps we need a poll to decide on the correct pronunciations? :tiphat:

HY-beh, you say? :(

#62 Mel Johnson

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 06:32 PM

A diaresis, which is the two dots over the vowel u (ü) makes it a bit different. Take the vowel sound and add an "e" to it, AT THE SAME TIME. Where you're from affects whether it's more on the u side or the e side.

#63 Marga

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Posted 04 March 2005 - 06:48 PM

To try it out, say "e" with your lips pushed forward.

#64 nysusan

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Posted 01 May 2005 - 10:34 AM

In anticipation of the Bolshoi's North American tour this summer, can anyone guide me on the pronounciation of Tsiskaridze, Belogolovtsev and Antonicheva?

#65 Marianna

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Posted 02 May 2005 - 08:14 AM

In anticipation of the Bolshoi's North American tour this summer, can anyone guide me on the pronounciation of Tsiskaridze, Belogolovtsev and Antonicheva?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi nysusan,

I have just consulted with my girlfriend who listened to me saying those names in Russian several times :) and after that she kindly transcribed for me what she's heard (rigid rules of Russian spelling and Russian-to-English transcription left aside):

Tsiskaridze - Tiz-ca-ri'ze (with the emphasis on the third syllable "RI")

Belogolovtsev - Bella-ga-loaf'-tef (with the emphasis on 'loaf' part :) )

Antonicheva
- An-to'-ni-chi-va (with the emphasis on the second syllable)

Lucky you nysusan! :angry2:

You will get to see all those dancers! :tiphat:

Hoping to read later about their performance! :beg:

#66 nysusan

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Posted 02 May 2005 - 02:20 PM

Thank you Marianna! Yes, I am lucky to have the opportunity to see all these great dancers, but my bank account is not feeling very lucky since I bought the tickets!

I may have to subsist on bread & water this summer to make up for all the money I've spent on NYCB,ABT & now the Bolshoi. Then again, I might lose some weight on a bread & water diet so it's all good!

#67 Guest_nycdog_*

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 08:08 AM

How is 'la Cour' pronounced? I'm assuming it's like 'Coors' beer without the s, but might it be cow'rr?

#68 carbro

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 03:47 PM

:) Solymosi? I've heard people pronounce it so that it sounds like the surname of NYCB's Jennie.

#69 Giselle05

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 06:19 PM

Ok, how about Corella? I've always thought it was just that, Corella, and then I heard a few people say something like Corei-a. (like hey-a :-)) Anyone know?

And, I'm not sure if this was covered before, but what about Xiomara?

#70 carbro

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Posted 05 June 2005 - 07:35 PM

Angel and Carmen are Ko-RAY-yah. (In Spanish, a double "L" makes the sound of a "Y", as in "yes.")

For Ms. Reyes, see djb's pronunciation. :wink:

#71 bart

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 06:45 AM

Angel and Carmen are Ko-RAY-yah.  (In Spanish, a double "L" makes the sound of a "Y", as in "yes.")


This is true for Latin America. In much of Spain there's a hint of the "L" -- along with the "y" -- in the pronunciation of the LL.

However, in contemporary Spain, as in Britain, it's increasingly okay to utilize pronunciations based on region, class, age, and attitude.

#72 Mel Johnson

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 01:26 PM

I used to get a good chuckle out of radio or TV newsreaders, who would speak of Edward vi-YAY-a.

#73 richard53dog

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 10:42 AM

:helpsmilie:  Solymosi?  I've heard people pronounce it so that it sounds like the surname of NYCB's Jennie.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Did it sound like Sho-li-mosh-i?

From my miniscule knowledge of Hungarian pronunciation, that's my thought.

I also have a BBC documentary where they make an announcement from the ROH about him and I seem to remember them using a pronunciation something like that.

I also remember hearing the name of the Hungarian soprano Sylvia Sass as
"Shash"

But I can't claim to be enything like an expert here

Richard

#74 carbro

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 10:50 AM

Thanks, Richard. My ear caught So-MO-shi. If the L was pronounced at all, it was slurred over.

#75 Helene

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Posted 07 June 2005 - 11:40 AM

In Hungarian, the "s" is pronounced "sh", and "ly" is pronounced "ee" (long "e"). There's no "l" sound in "ly."

Here's a pronunciation guide to Hungarian:
http://www.math.nyu..../Hungarian.html

Oh, the mess I used to make out of trying to pronounce the name "György," when "gy" is a simple "j" sound (as in "judge").


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