dirac

"Where are the Women in Ballet?"

133 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, aurora said:

 

And of course the Millepied 3 Movements is even more conventional, in that it was him having his live-in gf at that time do the costumes.

 

However she got that gig, she did an excellent job.  The costumes go a long way towards contextualizing the dancers, which made the choreography much more distinct.

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21 hours ago, sandik said:

Their technical director is a man, and almost all the regular production crew are men.  Their stage manager is a woman, and the stage manager before her was also a woman.  The head of the costume shop is a woman, and almost all of the crew are women.  Their executive director is a woman, the heads of development, marketing and community education are women, the principal of the school and most of the faculty are women, the conductors are all men, the CFO is a man, and the IT manager is a man.

 

Some of this sounds pretty conventional (women sew and men build), but they do a pretty good job in several other departments.

Having a lot of women in administrative and teaching roles is nothing special. 

 

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16 hours ago, dirac said:

Having a lot of women in administrative and teaching roles is nothing special. 

 

While it's true that women still outnumber men in teaching roles, having women in upper level management is less common, especially with larger companies (with larger budgets)  I'm not holding PNB up as an ideal situation -- I'm just saying that there are more layers to the issue.

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Posted (edited)

Recalling the sheer numbers of women in the ballet world (where as dance students they surely still way outnumber men) and their prominence as teachers and coaches everywhere--and as administrators in a number of places--makes their very weak numbers among the ranks of leading choreographers working for major, world-class ballet companies and their weak numbers as choreographers at many other companies, all the more ... notable.  Especially since the example of modern dance makes clear enough what the ballet world might be losing. That ballet has its own exigencies, and for women dancers especially, is evident enough...but can't be the whole story.

 

I did find myself thinking about POB in this discussion--they have commissioned or presented any number of works from women choreographers in recent decades, but from women who emerged and flourished and founded their own companies outside the ballet world. (At the time I'm thinking of the company was led by Brigitte Lefèvre.)

Edited by Drew

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On ABT's instagram this morning, the #MeetABTMonday feature is on Gemma Bond. And, for the Fun Fact, it states: "Gemma is an emerging CHOREOGRAPHER!"

 

Emerging? It goes on to state that Bond has been choreographing for at least 9 years, the same year she joined ABT. To be fair to ABT, maybe they say "emerging" since Bond is not nationally known as a choreographer. Still, it seems condescending.

 

A few people have commented beneath it asking for her work to be shown at ABT. If I was on Instagram, I'd agree.

 

 

 

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Well, I generally call someone "emerging" if they are still establishing their style, or if they are still working primarily as a performer.  It can be a tricky label, though -- an emerging choreographer in a ballet context will generally have access to resources that a young contemporary choreographer would never get.  Someone with a few dances under their belt might look at PNB's Next Step program (where most of the choreographers have only made 2 or 3 works) and question the "emerging" label, since the total package reflects a level of support that, in the modern dance world, only comes with significant experience.

 

Bond's pocket resume above certainly reflects a significant amount of experience -- if she were working as a contemporary choreographer, she would likely be labeled differently, but she's being described here on a track that assumes her goal is a slot on ABT's main season.  And so, she emerges...

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A photo of Angelica Generosa and James Moore rehearsing Lopez Ochoa's "Before After":

 

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