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Is a strictly Romantic company possible?


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#16 Hans

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 03:50 PM

You could do Coppélia, too, although that, too, was re-done by Petipa. Also the pas de six from La Vivandière (however original it may or may not be), Pas de Quatre, and Le Papillon.

#17 Mel Johnson

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 05:09 PM

"Vivandiere" would probably stand the best chance of getting it right, subject, of course, to the interpretation of the notation. As you have mentioned, Coppélia has been Petipized, but the others are actually Romantic Revival, as different from Romantic as Greek is from Greek Revival.

#18 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 12:52 PM

As a dancer, I identify more with the Romantic ballets, and was dreaming in my head about an all Romantic repertory, touring, costumes, etc. Giselle, La Sylphide. Les Sylphides- what else would be considered Romantic and who currently dancing would be in the company dancing which roles?

I do too love the romantic era and its ballets. Our company here in Miami (MCB) has Giselle in its repertoire, but it's basically Balanchine-based, so sometimes i really miss my hometown company (Ballet Nacional de Cuba) with its, for some critics, OVER ROMANTICIZED (and for some others old fashioned) vision of its signature piece, Giselle. I grew up listening to Mme. Alonso's strict respect for every single detail related with the romantic period in her choreography of this ballet, from the ears covered/middle parted XIX Century inspired hairdo to the Willis little groups formation "a la Choppiniana", (irreverent to the Mr. Diagonal's -aka Petipa- choreography for some).
Yes, i agree too (Hi Mel!) on the fact that it would be financially difficult, plus extremelly limited, due to the not so extensive offer of the few surviving pieces : (unless somebody would start "reviving a la Lacotte" some titles from which we just know probably the libretto, but choreographycally lost.) So far?, I WOULD SAY , "Giselle", "La Sylphide", "Grand Pas de Quatre","Ondine", "La Peri" "Farfalla", the Bournonville ones and YES , Neo-romanticism too : "Chopiniana". From my humble point of view, i would also include "L'espectre de la rose".
My ideal ballerina?...I have 2 to divide the roles: Lorna Feijoo (Boston Ballet) and Alina Cojocaru (Royal Ballet). :blushing: I would let them pick the roles.
:tiphat:

#19 Mel Johnson

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Posted 12 July 2007 - 04:57 PM

Farfalla might just be fun. I'd say that The Carnival of Venice (aka Satanella) might just be reachable, too. It was a musical comedy before it was a ballet, and lots of little bits of it survive in transcriptions of great teachers' class combinations. The show, like La Fille mal Gardée goes back into the 18th century, with comedy dialogue routines, song-and-dance, lots of "stage magic" and "oleos" for things like trained otters and such.

(When we say Farfalla, we're both referring to Le Papillon, right? There's a comic opera by that name, too.)

#20 leonid

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 12:17 PM

Farfalla might just be fun. I'd say that The Carnival of Venice (aka Satanella) might just be reachable, too. It was a musical comedy before it was a ballet, and lots of little bits of it survive in transcriptions of great teachers' class combinations. The show, like La Fille mal Gardée goes back into the 18th century, with comedy dialogue routines, song-and-dance, lots of "stage magic" and "oleos" for things like trained otters and such.

(When we say Farfalla, we're both referring to Le Papillon, right? There's a comic opera by that name, too.)


I love this thread and though it is fun to imagine I wonder how much descriptive material of Romantic choreography exists. I remember reading Ivor Guests descriptions of variations and combinations of steps some 40 odd years ago and thought dancers could'nt execute this today. Ivor Guest throws in tantalising tit bits, I wonder if there is a four course meal in existence?


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