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1/24/03 NYCB's performance and history?


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23 replies to this topic

#16 BW

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 02:51 PM

Thanks Leigh, I'd actually been to their website and that email address didn't work.:cool: Guess I'll resort to the phone and/or the NYCB bookstore...

dirac - appreciate your synopsis. My unlearned reaction when I saw it was that they were exactly that the"harbingers of death" and definitely felt a funereal twinge as they made their tophatted entrance...I could almost hear the horses' hooves on the cobblestones... Unfortunately, I did not really care for the ballet - whether this was due, in part to Askegard's costume and portrayal ...or just the general piece, I cannot say. :( Naturally, I am speaking here in regard to my emotional response...not specifically to the choreography, but the ballet as a whole.

#17 rkoretzky

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 03:32 PM

BW,

I am quite certain that you would find a complete run of Ballet Review at the Performing Arts Library at Lincoln Center. It is well worth a visit anyway, so I suggest that you try to fit it in on one of your upcoming trips into the city.

#18 BW

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 03:40 PM

Wonderful idea, "rk"!

By the way, is this the publication that Francis Mason is involved with?

#19 Farrell Fan

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 05:11 PM

Yes, BW, Francis Mason is the editor. Subscription rates for individuals are $23 for 1 year (four issues) or $41 for 2 years. The address for subscriptions is Ballet Review, 37 West 12 Street, Apt. 7J, New York, NY 10011.

Incidentally, when I got the Fall issue I put it aside intending to get to it later, and I didn't know about the Davidsbundlertanze article till ATM711 and dirac mentioned it. Thanks to them, I've now read it. I found it interesting but a little far-fetched.

#20 BW

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 05:47 PM

Thank you Farrell Fan. :cool:

#21 Leigh Witchel

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Posted 27 January 2003 - 10:57 PM

BW (and rkoretzky, who said something similar on another thread) - take heart with Davidsbundlertanze. It's not a ballet most people immediately take to on the first viewing. I didn't either. See how you feel when you see it on other programs.

#22 atm711

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 01:46 PM

I have a video of DBT which I rarely watch because it always leaves me emotionally drained---especially the PDD by Farrell and D'Amboise near the end of the work. I have always looked upon the work as the passing of one's youth and creativity--and the older I grow and the more friends I loose, the more poignant it becomes. Balanchine with a touch of Tudor?

In the aforementioned article by Adam Pinsker he writes the following:

"In the final duet, when the leader moves into the darkness and toward the sea after bidding farewell to his companion, she is left standing with her back to the audience in an attitude of grief. When I recovered f rom this deeply moving ending the first time I saw the ballet, I realised this recalls the ending of Tudor's 'Lilac Garden'. when the lovere is left alone center stage with his back to the audience. The whole ballet is reminiscent of Tudor in a number of ways. The series of duet conversations recalls 'The Leaves are Fading', Tudor's penultimate ballet. The use of gesture, seamlessly wedded to classical technique, is Tudor's signature, and here at the conclusion of the ballet Balanchine has once again recalled his colleague, whom he has always admired."

#23 Farrell Fan

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Posted 28 January 2003 - 01:54 PM

In the film "Elusive Muse," Jacques d'Amboise said his pas de deux with Suzanne continues to haunt him. For me, their final exit remains the most moving ballet moment I've ever experienced.

#24 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2003 - 04:21 PM

It is very moving, even on video.

Arlene Croce wrote a piece on the ballet when it premiered which is collected in "Going to the Dance" and may be in the most recent anthology as well, I don't recall. She brought up Tudor as well, although not in the same detail.


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