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RodeoAgnes de Mille


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32 replies to this topic

#1 kbarber

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 03:53 AM

Great article on the Australian Ballet's blog about the genesis of this all-American ballet: http://www.behindbal...allets-cowgirl/

Katherine Barber
www.toursenlair.blogspot.ca

#2 sandik

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:10 AM

Thanks so much for the link -- it's been too long since I saw the work!

Since you've opened up the topic, I'm curious how many people on the board have seen Rodeo recently, and what they think of it in a contemporary repertory.

#3 lmspear

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:25 AM

from 1973

#4 sandik

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:38 AM

Oh, thank you so much for this link. Sarry was great in this role!

I find it interesting that we don't really see much of deMille's choreography itself nowadays, but I see her influence, even signature movements, all over the place.

#5 Stage Right

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 03:54 PM

I love that ballet!! And also haven't seen it in a while. It seems to me that it would always be appropriate in the repertoire.....it's rather timeless, as a piece of Americana.

#6 Amy Reusch

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 07:34 AM

I am wondering anout DeMille's legacy, what with the new Peck ballet (of which I've only seen very short video clips) using Rodeo. Peck says 'I think the cowboy theme is a little cheesy'. Sometimes I feel DeMille's work is so 1950s era Americana and reflects a view we no longer have. I wonder if after a couple more decades go by this very 1950sish aspect will add to its charm rather than detract from it. Would a fresh restaging of it manage to put new life into it or would it again reflect our perspective on the 1950s outlook? The Cowboy mythology isn't very strong in our culture anymore (at least perhaps not so much outside the southwest)... i know of no children playing "cowboys & indians" as in earlier generations when there were plenty of cowboy shows on children's television.

Still, I cannot hear Rodeo without hearing the great American West, and I cannot help but feel the need to see cowboy hats somewhere in the new ballet. I wonder if I would like the Peck piece more if it were given cowboy trappings, or would I just find a new appreciation of DeMille's work by the contrast? I think I'd like to see it without the backdrops, more minimalist... The music cries out "cowboy", would it be more evocative without every detail filled in for us? But, don't lose the cowboy hats!

Who is protecting DeMille's legacy? Is she just another forgotten woman choreographer? Or did she have the misfortune to pass away before this concept of trusts to protect a choreographer's legacy came into being?

What would we think if ABT gave a young dancer/choreographer Agon's music to create a ballet to?

It just seems a little strange. Was it daring? Or was it something else?

#7 abatt

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 07:53 AM

I also think some people associate the Copland music with the beef industry, because for a period of years the beef industry was using the Rodeo music in its commercials to promote consumption of steaks and other beef products.  I think this reinforced the notion that the Copland music is an evocation of the West and of cowboys and cattle. In fact, I bet many more  Americans are aware of the commercials that the DeMille ballet.

 

Peck may say that he finds the cowboy theme cheesy, but he nevertheless used the music as a vehicle for a ballet about male bonding.

 

DeMille may not have had a trust, but her ballet is still under copyright protection, I believe. 

 

I think additionally that since NYCB has Western Symphony in its rep, Peck was trying especially hard to avoid a duplication of any explicit Western theme in his ballet. (Would Peck really want to invite a comparison with a Balanchine ballet?  I doubt it.)   Since certain members of the media have been complaining for years that ballet involves too much conventional male-female coupling and partnering, it seems Peck decided to take that idea and run with it.  It certainly got him a rave from at least one major newspaper critic here in NYC.



#8 California

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 09:20 AM

DeMille may not have had a trust, but her ballet is still under copyright protection, I believe. 

 

 

Rodeo was made in 1942, decades before "choreographic works" was added as an eligible category for copyright in the Copyright Law of 1976. She famously testified before Congress on the importance of adding that category. It's possible that pre-1976 she copyrighted some of her work under the category "dramatico-musical" work, which I understand Balanchine to have  used. And, of course, the Copland score was copyrightable. It's interesting that on the DeMille web site, there is no mention of the copyright status of Rodeo. Does anybody know?

 http://www.agnesdemi....com/rodeo.html



#9 abatt

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 09:23 AM

Thanks.  I didn't realize that copyrighting of dance works was added to the law so late.



#10 sandik

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 09:58 AM

Oh boy -- I'll go do some homework, but this is a fascinating group of questions.

 

Americana in ballet:

 

The image of the American West in contemporary art is indeed in flux.  Reams and reams of material has been written about this, and I don't pretend to have read anything other than a fraction of it, but Amy identifies a fundamental aspect -- we no longer identify the West of "Cowboys and Indians" as a major part of contemporary life.  I saw a screening of Gene Autry's Radio Ranch last weekend, and was reminded about how central to our national identity the world of the working cowboy was in the beginning and the middle of the last century -- it does not hold that same place today.  DeMille made Rodeo during the run up to WWII and the Depression -- she was determined to use the iconography of her time, and her ballet (alongside the dances she made for Oklahoma using much of the same vocabulary) is pretty firmly identified with those ideas and that time.

 

(a colleague of mine is writing a book about American ballet in the mid-20th c, and has been steeping herself in these works -- I hear a lot about it when we talk!)

 

Copyright and estate:

 

DeMille was indeed integral to the extension of copyright to include dance -- her Broadway work was, I believe, the first work to be entered into copyright.  But that doesn't mean that someone is managing her artistic estate in the same way that Balanchine, Cunningham, Tudor etc are being both protected and promoted. 

 

Programming:

 

I don't have any insight on the discussions that go on among the artistic staff at NYCB, but I can certainly imagine that they would prefer not to have two "cowboy hat" ballets made to music from the mid-20th c in their rep.  And they perform Western Symphony much more often that ABT performs Rodeo.

 

I have an appointment, so have to scoot -- back later...



#11 abatt

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 10:14 AM

I doubt a cowboy hat ballet would be Justin Peck's style.

 

I see that NYCB is reviving Western Symphony for the Saratoga season this summer, which probably means we will be seeing it during the 2015-16 season at the Koch.  Wonder if they will do an "Americana" themed program with Western and Rodeo.  Peter Martins has become fond of marketing theme based programs.



#12 Amy Reusch

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 10:25 AM

I believe the recording of Rodeo on film/bideo and filing it with the Library of Congress counted towards copyrighting... Had it not been recorded, there would have een more trouble. There are works of Oris Humphrey's that were recorded fter her death that are copyrighted to her son, I believe...

#13 Amy Reusch

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:03 PM

My wondering about the DeMille legacy was less about copyright and more about whether her oeuvre was still being encouraged... It is not enough to prserve a work by enforcing copyright...if the work is not performed regularly it ceases to be on the dance world's radar and slowly is done less & less... Until no one bothers to do it because they just don't think of it... I thought Baryshnikov was spot on to attempt to preserve works by performing them...(am thinking of Judson).

#14 sandik

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 12:47 AM

My wondering about the DeMille legacy was less about copyright and more about whether her oeuvre was still being encouraged... It is not enough to prserve a work by enforcing copyright...if the work is not performed regularly it ceases to be on the dance world's radar and slowly is done less & less... Until no one bothers to do it because they just don't think of it... I thought Baryshnikov was spot on to attempt to preserve works by performing them...(am thinking of Judson).

 

This is spot on.  Dancers learn by doing, and dances are preserved by being performed.  You can, with time and perseverance, reconstruct work that has fallen out of active repertory -- people like Millicent Hodson and Doug Fullington have proved that.  But for every victory they have, we continue to lose more and more of our heritage -- copyright protects the artist against plagarism, but not against inactivity.



#15 dirac

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 02:31 PM

You can, with time and perseverance, reconstruct work that has fallen out of active repertory -- people like Millicent Hodson and Doug Fullington have proved that.

 

 

Definitely -- with the note that some have characterized some of Hodson's work as more reimaginings than reconstructions.




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