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Dale

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Everything posted by Dale

  1. Yes, this story explains the how and why the production came to Miami: https://wwd.com/eye/lifestyle/george-balanchine-firebird-miami-city-ballet-1203486055/
  2. @California I won't say they don't but I haven't heard that they do. I think the Chagall Firebird would be very special to NYCB and it's also probably fragile. I noticed that when ABT added Symphony in C to its rep, it rented the costumes from National Ballet of Canada. I think NYCB would want to keep their Firebird proprietary so audiences come to see it in NY. But also, Miami has redesigned several Balanchine ballets recently to make them more Miami-centric. They moved Midsummer underwater and this is like Tsar in the Tropics. I don't think either worked. ETA - NYCB doesn't have the license to the ballets. Those belong to the Balanchine Trust. We have threads about it on the board somewhere but he left the ballets to people, not the institution.
  3. Tallchief was certainly not 5'9". There's a picture out there of Tallchief, Le Clercq and Adams in Apollo with Eglevsky and you can clearly see she's shorter than the other women. Wow, I missed a lot. I follow Kathryn Morgan and I did not see this on her feed (I follow way too many people and I miss things!). This is a real shame. It was the costume that should have been jettisoned, not the dancer. That unitard was tacky and distracting. All the costumes looked like they came from the Fredericks of Hollywood clearance rack. [I should apologize for missing the small children in the production when I talked about it on another thread. Evidently I missed them in the profusion of hot pink and yellow on the stage] I think Kathryn Morgan has something that can't be got with a diet or a tacky costume - she has a special way of moving and responding to the music. It should be nurtured. She would have looked smashing in a red tutu.
  4. I thought I read that the SAB workshop stream was going to be part of a celebration where former SAB students talk about their experience. (some of these videos are up on SAB's YT channel) NYCB dancers have been amplifying the company's offerings on social media. It wouldn't surprise me if this is something that's encouraged, even expected now that they're not dancing, in order to help the company and raise money. All good things, not saying this is a bad thing. But in light of the last week's events and the current goings on, some dancers might not have their heart into that sort of social media campaign. Many of us follow the dancers and they - like many of us - have been upset and angry and hurt. This SAB workshop was very important, especially as it had a tribute to Arthur Mitchell and featured two African-American dancers in the pas de deux of Agon. Something we haven't seen at NYCB. This was something to be celebrated and I can certainly understand why they'd want to put a pause on it until a time when it can be fully appreciated.
  5. A release: AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE, HUBBARD STREET DANCE CHICAGO AND ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER JOIN TOGETHER FOR COMPANY CLASS, TUESDAY, JUNE 2 and THURSDAY, JUNE 4 at 12 Noon ET CLASSES TO STREAM LIVE ON FACEBOOK LIVE AND INSTAGRAM ABT BALLET MASTER CARLOS LOPEZ AND HUBBARD STREET DANCE CHICAGO ARTISTIC DIRECTOR GLENN EDGERTON TO LEAD CLASSES Dancers from American Ballet Theatre, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater will come together for two virtual company classes on Tuesday, June 2 and Thursday, June 4. Each hour and a half class, beginning at 12 Noon ET, will stream on Facebook Live and Instagram @ABTOfficial. Classes will include both ballet barre and center work. The first class on June 2 will be conducted by ABT Ballet Master Carlos Lopez. Lopez launched a virtual ABT Company Class on March 14 of this year and has held more than 35 classes thus far, with additional classes taught by ABT colleagues and alumni. The class will be accompanied by pianist Michael Scales. Glenn Edgerton, artistic director of Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, will teach the Thursday, June 4 class. The class will beaccompanied by pianist Michael Roberts. “A silver lining from the pandemic has been to connect with other great artists,” said Edgerton. “It’s ironic as we are socially distancing locally, we are virtually connecting around the world like never before. The camaraderie and the energy of sharing our common passion of dance has given us solace.” “What a wonderful opportunity for dancers from these three companies to come together, share and learn from one another,” said Kevin McKenzie, ABT Artistic Director. “Participating in daily class reminds us of our common needs and basic connections.” For more information on American Ballet Theatre’s digital offerings, please visit www.abt.org/abtoffstage.
  6. Thankfully we won’t have to wonder where the next Lincoln Center dance offering is, SAB has posted the link on their YouTube page:
  7. I've been very impressed with the company and the stagings. I feel the intention is there with each of the three Balanchine ballets they've shown.
  8. @California You are probably right. It's interesting that they posted it "unlisted" on YouTube. I mean, what's the point of making it available, even for a limited time, if people can't find it readily? Lincoln Center's own videos are put up very clearly on its YT channel. Even old Live from Lincoln Center videos. The Midsummer was posted in a similar way as the other NYCB videos for its digital season and even featured an introduction by Jonathan Stafford. It will be interesting to see if the other offerings get put up in similar ways. My guess is the SAB and NYCB will follow form. The original broadcast featured backstage interviews. This is the way the recording is listed at the NYPL: Cassette 1 (ca. 72 min. total). Les sylphides (ca. 36 min.) / choreography, Michel Fokine; music, Frédéric Chopin, orchestrated by Benjamin Britten; scenery, Alexandre Benois; lighting, Nananne Porcher; danced by Eleanor D'Antuono, Rebecca Wright, Marianna Tcherkassky, Ivan Nagy, and corps de ballet. Grand pas de deux from Don Quixote (ca. 15 min.) / choreography after Marius Petipa; music, Leon Minkus; lighting, Nananne Porcher; danced by Natalia Makarova, and Fernando Bujones. Backstage interviews (ca. 17 min.) with Natalia Makarova, Fernando Bujones, and Erik Bruhn. Cassette 2 (ca. 93 min. total). Theme and variations (ca. 24 min.) / choreography, George Balanchine; music, Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky; costumes, Desmond Heeley; lighting, Jennifer Tipton; danced by Gelsey Kirkland, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and others. Backstage interviews (ca. 17 min.) with Gelsey Kirkland and Erik Bruhn. The firebird (ca. 46 min.) / choreography, Michel Fokine, restaged by Christopher Newton; music, Igor Stravinsky; scenery and costumes, Nathalie Gontcharova; lighting, Nananne Porcher; danced by Cynthia Gregory (the Firebird), John Meehan (Prince Ivan), Marcos Paredes (the immortal Kostchei), Leslie Browne (the Princess), and others. Cassette 3. Backstage with Live from Lincoln Center [interview with Mikhail Baryshnikov] (c1977; ca. 14 min.) / taped and telecast on June 2, 1977, after a performance of Giselle. Director, Robert Schwarz; producer, John Goberman; interviewer and new introduction: Dick Cavett.
  9. The YouTube video is "unlisted," which is why it didn't come up on their YouTube channel. I had to sign in with my email address on the Lincoln Center website to get the option of seeing a video box. But it's all good now. God, I've never seen this video so clean. I own a watery tape of a tape, same as the bits and pieces on YT.
  10. Nope. Why wouldn't they put it on YT like the others?
  11. This isn't quite how NYCB does the production (which was a revival in 1985 of the version done for Tallchief). The corps dance in front of the scrim (Chagall's, of course) to give time for the last set change) and then we get the tableau in all of the artist's glory. And rather than static, Balanchine uses stage craft. As the music swells, the lights get bright, brighter, brightest until all that color is saturated. The stage fills with people, including the monsters. And when the brass section comes in one last time, the young children come running in with platters of food and drink, racing to and fro as the music is whipped into one last frenzy. The main couple move forward, with some of the children holding on to the Princess's train (she's wearing the most magnificent blood red jeweled dress with a long train. I believe the curtain comes down and then back up so we get one last glimpse of it all.
  12. That is very beautiful. Now, that, makes me want to see the ballet in the theater (in a couple of years!).
  13. I had the opposite reaction. I mean, I love the ballet, and ironically Lourdes Lopez was one of my favorites in performing the lead role. First, I think the re-costuming is just off. The firebird now looks like one of the failed experiments Balanchine had. The big feathered tail just seemed to get in the way with a lot of the partnering. The shiny material, which I guess was supposed to convey fire, just looked a little cheap. The color scheme for the rest was ... I know MCB has started trying to make these Balanchine productions more of their own by tailoring them to its "tropical" location. I just don't think it works. I didn't think their Midsummer worked thematically. And I don't think it works here - why are women in a tropical place wearing Russian-style tiaras? I also was surprised at some of the choices in the choreography. The firebird's last solo seemed to have accents and exaggerations missing from Maria Tallchief's interpretation and the subsequent productions at NYCB. And finally, they did not include the small children at the end (is the thought that they are servants and the ballet seems to be promoting child labor?) and the princess did not wear a different gown. I'll have to watch it again and maybe move past these visual things. I feel almost churlish to complain since I am so happy MCB allowed the video to be seen for free.
  14. Jack and Helen, from what I read is in the 70s and early 80s, they were allowed to film but no orchestra. So you'll find videos in the NYPL collection in practice clothes with a piano but taking place on stage. There are some stage performances here and there from earlier. And the library also has catalogued donated pirated video. One year, recently, a whole pile of DVDs of Farrell in performance from the 80s was added to the catalogue. Maybe it was from the company; maybe from an admirer. I know from the mid-80s there were house cameras recording. They recorded a "close" version and a "wide" version. The lighting is a little bit dark. The "close" was to record the soloists and the "wide" the whole stage. The large-scale celebrations of Robbins and then Balanchine were recorded. Even if they couldn't get the rights to things that were on Great Performances or Live from Lincoln Center, they have a treasure trove of material, that if signed off on, could supply a sexy enough catalogue to entice people to subscribe long-term, even without new performances to add. Oh, and SAB, too. I do believe that there would be close to 40 years of workshop performances filmed. And speaking of Great Performances or Live from Lincoln Center - I was told that they would film dress rehearsals and/or other night's performances so the director and camera people could workout the shot selections. So there's some of that footage out there, too.
  15. Yeah, I would say the quality at NTL is a bit better. I went to a few in-theater screenings of productions that wound up on Digital Theatre. Good shows. I think it's the difference between offerings/libraries. Like, I think Met HD streaming service is a good example. They have a huge catalogue. Not just of the Met Live in HD theater broadcasts but all those years of the productions that would get filmed for PBS. And audio/radio recordings. It really does make it worth the price. Whereas, say, Medici TV - doesn't have that big library. I will say that, for example, Amazon Prime Video makes it very easy to pick up and then drop services (easier than with cable - they call it "churning"), so I could see myself add Broadway in HD for a month or so and then drop it when I've exhausted my possibilities. [forgive my long-windedness on the topic - the streaming television industry is one of my specialties at work] NTL has a smaller library than Met in HD - they've been at it a lot less time and do fewer productions a season than the Met. Still, with their star power (not just in actors - Tom Stoppard and David Hare have shown off their latest plays on NTL), they could do well, especially if they partner up with other British theaters. ETA, a deep catalogue is another reason NYCB might be successful. They not only have everything they've recently recorded (which is you look at those "Anatomy of a Dance" or "Flash Footage" series, is quite a bit) but all the old house camera library (which dates back to the late 80s/early 90s). If they can get people/unions to sign off, they could have a pretty deep library.
  16. The National Theatre Live screenings are very popular where I am, even without big name actors. Of course, when there is a popular actor starring, they get wider releases (mainstream theater vs. art house or college cinema). To me, the series seems to have a stamp of approval. You know you'll get a quality product, even if you like one vs. the other. People have been clamoring for an at-home way to rewatch the shows for years.
  17. Upcoming week: ABT OFFSTAGE, MAY 25–31 2020 Romeo and Juliet In this weekly online series running through July 4, American Ballet Theatre OffStage offers diverse behind-the-scenes experiences of America’s National Ballet Company®. The third week of ABT OffStage features conversations, ballet classes and blog posts themed to Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet. #ABTMetMemory: Alexandre Hammoudi Monday, May 25 at 12pm ET on YouTube and Instagram: ABT Soloist Alexandre Hammoudi, who has danced the roles of Tybalt and Romeo in Romeo and Juliet, will share his favorite Met season memories. The video will remain on ABT’s YouTube channel and IGTV for future viewings. Guest Artist Spotlight: Natalia Osipova Tuesday, May 26 on ABT.org: Guest Artist Natalia Osipova was set to reunite with ABT Principal Dancer David Hallberg for one special performance of Romeo and Juliet this season. Visit ABT’s website for a feature on Osipova at www.abt.org/abtoffstage. Debut Deferred: Cassandra Trenary Wednesday, May 27 on ABT.org, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter: Prior to shelter-in-place orders, ABT Soloist Cassandra Trenary had been rehearsing the role of Juliet for her premiere at the Abu Dhabi Festival and her New York debut at the Met. Visit ABT’s social media channels to see a rehearsal video and ABT’s website for a Q&A with Trenary. Hee Seo and Cory Stearns in Romeo and Juliet. Photo: Rosalie O’Connor. ABT@80: A Fond Look Back with ABT’s First Romeo Thursday, May 28 on YouTube and ABT.org: Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet was given its ABT Premiere in 1985, danced by Leslie Browne and Robert La Fosse. View a special feature on La Fosse, a former Principal Dancer and current faculty member at the ABT Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School, on YouTube and ABT’s website. ABT Classics as Ballet Classes: Romeo and Juliet with Devon Teuscher and Cory Stearns Friday, May 29 at 12pm ET on YouTube: ABT Principal Dancers Devon Teuscher and Cory Stearns will teach a free ballet class inspired by Romeo and Juliet. The video will be available on ABT YouTube channel. ABT Weekend Talk Series: Misty Copeland and Calvin Royal III with Susan Fales-Hill Saturday, May 30 at 12pm ET on YouTube: ABT Principal Dancer Misty Copeland and Soloist Calvin Royal III were scheduled to perform Romeo and Juliet together this season. They will discuss the iconic roles and the significance of this performance with ABT Trustee Susan Fales-Hill. The conversation will remain on ABT’s YouTube channel for future viewings. Hair and Makeup Feature: Styling the Harlot Wigs Sunday, May 31 on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter: Rena Most and Jill Haley of ABT’s Wigs and Makeup team share background on styling of the unique wigs for the role of Harlot in Romeo and Juliet. Visit www.abt.org/abtoffstage to download a free Romeo and Juliet background for your next virtual meeting!
  18. Next week" ABT OFFSTAGE, MAY 25–31 2020 Romeo and Juliet In this weekly online series running through July 4, American Ballet Theatre OffStage offers diverse behind-the-scenes experiences of America’s National Ballet Company®. The third week of ABT OffStage features conversations, ballet classes and blog posts themed to Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet. #ABTMetMemory: Alexandre Hammoudi Monday, May 25 at 12pm ET on YouTube and Instagram: ABT Soloist Alexandre Hammoudi, who has danced the roles of Tybalt and Romeo in Romeo and Juliet, will share his favorite Met season memories. The video will remain on ABT’s YouTube channel and IGTV for future viewings. Guest Artist Spotlight: Natalia Osipova Tuesday, May 26 on ABT.org: Guest Artist Natalia Osipova was set to reunite with ABT Principal Dancer David Hallberg for one special performance of Romeo and Juliet this season. Visit ABT’s website for a feature on Osipova at www.abt.org/abtoffstage. Debut Deferred: Cassandra Trenary Wednesday, May 27 on ABT.org, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter: Prior to shelter-in-place orders, ABT Soloist Cassandra Trenary had been rehearsing the role of Juliet for her premiere at the Abu Dhabi Festival and her New York debut at the Met. Visit ABT’s social media channels to see a rehearsal video and ABT’s website for a Q&A with Trenary. Hee Seo and Cory Stearns in Romeo and Juliet. Photo: Rosalie O’Connor. ABT@80: A Fond Look Back with ABT’s First Romeo Thursday, May 28 on YouTube and ABT.org: Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet was given its ABT Premiere in 1985, danced by Leslie Browne and Robert La Fosse. View a special feature on La Fosse, a former Principal Dancer and current faculty member at the ABT Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School, on YouTube and ABT’s website. ABT Classics as Ballet Classes: Romeo and Juliet with Devon Teuscher and Cory Stearns Friday, May 29 at 12pm ET on YouTube: ABT Principal Dancers Devon Teuscher and Cory Stearns will teach a free ballet class inspired by Romeo and Juliet. The video will be available on ABT YouTube channel. ABT Weekend Talk Series: Misty Copeland and Calvin Royal III with Susan Fales-Hill Saturday, May 30 at 12pm ET on YouTube: ABT Principal Dancer Misty Copeland and Soloist Calvin Royal III were scheduled to perform Romeo and Juliet together this season. They will discuss the iconic roles and the significance of this performance with ABT Trustee Susan Fales-Hill. The conversation will remain on ABT’s YouTube channel for future viewings. Hair and Makeup Feature: Styling the Harlot Wigs Sunday, May 31 on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter: Rena Most and Jill Haley of ABT’s Wigs and Makeup team share background on styling of the unique wigs for the role of Harlot in Romeo and Juliet. Visit www.abt.org/abtoffstage to download a free Romeo and Juliet background for your next virtual meeting!
  19. ABT finally offers some clips. This is a nice video to celebrate the anniversary of Makarova's 40th anniversary of La Bayadere, includes an interview with Natalia Makarova and clips of her performance back from the 70s (<sigh> back in the heyday of PBS's culture offerings): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy5I-hdtFfg
  20. More news: AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE JOINS NEW YORK CARES TO ASSIST VOLUNTEER EFFORTS FOR THE ACTORS FUND AND KEEN Building on the success of American Ballet Theatre’s “80 Hours of Service” with the New York Cares Coat Drive, which kicked off the Company’s 80th Anniversary earlier this year, ABT staff and artists are again joining forces with New York Cares to serve New Yorkers in need. In addition, ABT will begin its first collaboration with KEEN, Kids Enjoy Exercise Now, to bring creative movement to children and young adults with disabilities. During the world health crisis resulting from COVID-19, New York Cares continues to serve the NYC community by mobilizing New Yorkers in volunteer service. To aid in this effort, volunteers from American Ballet Theatre will participate in virtual phone banking to assist seniors and other adults served by The Actors Fund, a human services organization focused on the needs of the entertainment community, including dancers. This socially distanced activity will take place through one-on-one phone calls to clients of The Actors Fund. The calls will serve as an important source of socialization and a way to connect those in need to appropriate support. American Ballet Theatre will extend its service by working with KEEN, Kids Enjoy Exercise Now, a New York Cares Community Partner. Participants in KEEN, an athletics-based program open to youths with physical or development disabilities, will be given exclusive access to free online creative movement classes, designed by ABT Teaching Artists and tied to themes around ABT’s repertory. KEEN families will gain insight into ballet through exposure to ABTKids Daily activities and virtual dance classes. “This is a wonderful opportunity for ABT artists and staff to share the warmth and empathy that is the hallmark of American Ballet Theatre,” said ABT Executive Director Kara Medoff Barnett. “We are grateful to our partners at New York Cares for their incredible leadership and exemplary model of service to the city we call home. We are proud to partner with New York Cares, The Actors Fund, and KEEN to offer our time and talents to our fellow New Yorkers.” For more information on American Ballet Theatre, please visit www.abt.org.
  21. And here, people complained that the Kennedy Center was getting relief. I have to remind people that cultural centers, performing arts, museums, public gardens, theaters, opera etc..these are major employers. And contribute greatly to the economic welfare of their cities/towns and various industries.
  22. Looks like the Mariinsky is starting repeats. I would have thought they had more left in the store, so to speak. But at least they're continuing. Looks like the Bolshoi is done with the free streams. They put up a "Thank you for watching" video. But I really liked this Petipa Gala. A nicely done bit of Balanchine and the last act of the reconstructed Sleeping Beauty (which we don't see enough).
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