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Principal vs. PrincipleHopeless cause?


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#16 puppytreats

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:54 AM

But I myself make silly "principle / principal"-type mistakes all the time because I've become too reliant on automatic completion and spell check. Oh, and because computer keyboards allow you to type faster than you can think. It took a bit longer to pound things out on a typewriter.


I confused them all the time, even before I started using computers. I always have to have a dictionary and grammar or style guide available.

#17 Jack Reed

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 08:49 AM

Copy editors can have their own weird biases and gaps in knowledge, but that's another thread.....


Okay. If I can spin that thread for a moment, Calcium Light Night, the title of the last Ives piece in the suite Martins assembled for his first ballet, and the name he gave to it, was - and may still be - an annual overnight custom at Yale, involving the use of metallic calcium, which burns, in portable lamps - calcium lights - and in which custom the composer participated while a student there; whence his musical representation of it. It's not obvious whether the gap in knowledge here is Gottlieb's or his editor's.

With all of this, maybe we don't even need mention an ordinary typo, but in Arlene Croce's review of the premiere of Calcium in the February 20, 1978 New Yorker, reprinted in Going to the Dance, describing the action on stage, she says, "bodies are clamped together, then slid apart."

With all its technical faults, this review is a bit of a mess, but no less worth reading, not least for the use of "pissed off" in the second part. There, Gottlieb wonders about hard-working Hubbard Street's success, but it strikes me that it's not for nothing it's based in, and named for a street in, the "City of the Big Shoulders," as Carl Sandburg fairly characterized Chicago.

#18 kfw

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:22 AM

Speaking of bad editing, Calcium Light Night always comes to my mind as "Calcium Night Light"!

#19 Jack Reed

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 10:18 AM

Tsk! It used to be spoken of that way, back in the day. But Ives had a lot more in mind than a little something on your bedside table to keep you from being afraid in the dark! Quite a tumultuous evening, in fact, though none of this is represented as such in Martins's (how's my punctuation, folks?) ballet. Nor need it be, as far as I'm concerned; the near-violence late in the ballet Gottlieb refers to seems to come out of the music, even if something else went in. Martins's tumult is of a different kind. (I wasn't crazy about his ballet when I first saw it, but I thought it was a very fine and strong piece of work, partly because of being all of a piece.)

#20 dirac

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 02:54 PM

Tsk! It used to be spoken of that way, back in the day.


Well, Balanchine liked it enough to stick it in to his own ballet. That would certainly be good enough for me.....

With all of this, maybe we don't even need mention an ordinary typo, but in Arlene Croce's review of the premiere of Calcium in the February 20, 1978 New Yorker, reprinted in Going to the Dance, describing the action on stage, she says, "bodies are clamped together, then slid apart."


Hmmm. I read it as the same tense - bodies are clamped and then are slid.

#21 LiLing

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:16 AM

[size="3"]Yes, I thought the choreographer slid them apart. They did not slide of their own volition. A subtle comment on Martins' use of dancers? Posted Image [/size]

#22 bart

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:29 AM

The complexities of "bring" v. "take" continue to elude me. I guess we all have our weak (weak-week: another homonym) points.

#23 Jack Reed

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 04:13 PM

Hmmm. I read it as the same tense - bodies are clamped and then are slid.


[size=3]Yes, I thought the choreographer slid them apart. They did not slide of their own volition. A subtle comment on Martins' use of dancers? Posted Image [/size]


I only intended a comment on Gottlieb's quoting - via his copy-editor's sloppy work? - "part" instead of "apart" and now I'm wondering how I got into this...

But yes, I do think Croce's characterization of what we saw is, as usual, spot on, even down to the concluding remark, which, still having my book open, I'd like to share for its droll flavor (Keep in mind that Watts in those days had about the most extreme tubular opposite of the stereotypical feminine hourglass figure of anyone in that lean company.):

Daniel Duell and Heather Watts are excellent. The stage is undressed except for a square tube of light hung overhead. [size=4]The uncostumes are perhaps too severe. Watts, in her crimson unitard sheared off at calf and bustline, looks like a thermometer.

[/size]

#24 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:12 AM

[size=5][font=georgia,serif]I have done some editing for a luxury goods website and recently came across a dealer in antiques who managed to spell the word triptych three different ways, none of them correct. Spelling mistakes really irk me - in this case, it's their business! And then we get into the pet peeve department; one of mine happens to be pled/pleaded in news reports....[/font][/size]

#25 kbarber

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 06:51 AM

[size=5][font=georgia,serif] And then we get into the pet peeve department; one of mine happens to be pled/pleaded in news reports....[/font][/size]

Just out ofcuriosity and wandering even further off topic, what about pled/pleaded bothers you? Using both forms in the same article? Using one form instead of the other? (In which case, which form don't you like?)

#26 kbarber

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 06:54 AM

to add to the list of unintentionally comic misspellings, the National Ballet of Canada posted a photo to their facebook page of a ballerina sowing [sic] her pointe shoes...

#27 dirac

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:07 AM

Hmmm. I read it as the same tense - bodies are clamped and then are slid.


Yes, I thought the choreographer slid them apart. They did not slide of their own volition. A subtle comment on Martins' use of dancers? Posted Image


I only intended a comment on Gottlieb's quoting - via his copy-editor's sloppy work? - "part" instead of "apart" and now I'm wondering how I got into this...


Ah. I misinterpreted the italicization of "apart" in your original post. I thought that the use of the italic was meant to draw attention to the "a" in "apart" in the original quote, not as an indication that the "a" had been omitted in the quote as printed in Gottlieb's piece.

#28 Quiggin

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:32 PM

kbarber:

the National Ballet of Canada posted a photo to their facebook page of a ballerina sowing [sic] her pointe shoes...


Dancer do sow steps.

I always hesitate at peek and peak. At some point these things are like grammatical odette/odile choices.

Here's a dubious apostrophe in San Francisco. Maybe the o' threw the sign painter off.

(At Tumblr but in the safe section) http://canariesinthe...age/51495304101

#29 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:28 PM


[size=5][font=georgia,serif] And then we get into the pet peeve department; one of mine happens to be pled/pleaded in news reports....[/font][/size]

Just out ofcuriosity and wandering even further off topic, what about pled/pleaded bothers you? Using both forms in the same article? Using one form instead of the other? (In which case, which form don't you like?)


Unless I need to adhere to a style guide that says otherwise, I'm a "pled" girl myself. :)

#30 sandik

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 02:16 PM

I always hesitate at peek and peak.


"Peek" and "see" both have a double "e" -- maybe that will help.


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