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some questions about the site


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9 replies to this topic

#1 AlbanyGirl

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 06:59 AM

Hello.

I've searched this forum to find answers to these questions without success.

What does it mean when a topic is designated 'hot'? Some topics are really old but still have the 'hot' icon next to them.

What does it mean when a topic is 'pinned'?

Why does a board member 'lock' a topic?

Thank you.

#2 ascballerina

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 08:38 AM

As no one's responded yet, I'll do my best to help you out. Posted Image

What does it mean when a topic is designated 'hot'? Some topics are really old but still have the 'hot' icon next to them.
This means that a lot of people are still viewing the topic, even if there are no new replies. An example might be a topic called "A Very Young Dancer". Even if the last post was in 2000, people are still searching this on Google, or on here, and accessing the topic for various reasons.

What does it mean when a topic is 'pinned'?
This means that a topic will remain at the top of the forum, regardless of when the last post was, or how the forum is otherwise sorted. They're usually rules.

Why does a board member 'lock' a topic?
A mod might better answer this, but I can think of several reasons based on my own experience. If the topic is a rule, there is no discussing it. Therefore, it will be locked. If the topic is old and has no credence anymore (such as, say, a topic on a performance in 2006), then there is no point in leaving it open. If the topic contains an issue that members feel so strongly about that there is almost a fight going on, then the topic would certainly be locked, if attempts to restore order don't succeed. And if the topic is just plain against the rules, then it will be locked as well.

#3 carbro

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 09:46 AM

Even though ascballerina is still a New Member, she has answered correctly. I would add that the designation as a "hot" topic is not done by us. It's a calculation made by the server at Invisionzone, our host.

#4 sandik

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:49 PM

I like to think that if we made the "hot" designation, it would be "hotsy totsy."

#5 AlbanyGirl

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:57 PM

Thank you, ascballerina! I appreciate your help.

#6 ascballerina

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 06:08 AM

You're welcome. :)

#7 Helene

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:25 PM

Yes, carbro is right: when a thread reaches a certain number of posts, it's considered "hot". An ascballerina is right about "Pinned" and "Locked." "Pinned" is sometimes called a "sticky."

We also sometimes lock topics because they're duplicates, and we want to redirect people to the original thread. (Other times we're able to merge the threads together.)

#8 Birdsall

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 01:49 PM

I posted a question under the "Rules and Regulations" I just wanted clarification, b/c I am unsure what exactly "discussing the discussion" means. Does it only mean discussing the discussion just to be nasty or is it anything? I have written, "As someone said above...." and I wonder if that is actually discussing the discussion. Please clarify with examples if possible what is okay and what is not okay concerning "do not discuss the discussion." It seems like if we followed it strictly simply quoting each other is sort of discussing the discussion, or am I being dense?

#9 Helene

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:23 PM

"Discussing the discussion" falls into two categories:

1. Discussing the posters instead of the subject. Examples are: "You're biased against her." "Why so nasty?". "You don't have to be so rude." "I don't know what your problem is."

We want members to discuss the subject/issue, not each other. We assume that if there's obvious bias on someone's part, our members are smart enough to see it and weigh comments/info accordingly, and that people's posts say more about the poster than anyone else's commentary.

Mentioning that you agree or disagree with what's posted on a subject/referring to another post in text rather than quoting it is fine, because that's talking about the subject. We encourage hearty debate, but like to avoid food fights.

2. Discussing the rules, disputing the rules or telling people how or what to discuss. We have one more bullet point than the Bill of Rights, and while we wish they were self-evident and didn't have to be written, the reason they are is from long, hard experience.

There's a "Report" button for each post, and if anyone thinks that a post has crossed the line or has a question about whether a post has, we ask that BAers use it. We'll review the post, and respond via email or PM if we disagree and why. It could means the post needs a short edit, and the rest is fine and quite informative. We just ask that you give us some time -- we may be several or many time zones behind you.

#10 Birdsall

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:48 PM

I see. This clarifies things. This is so different from the opera sites. They have "food fights" there!!! As much as I don't necessarily like food fights, I am used to it, and I actually find it humorous, but I know how some people get very upset. I have worked in public schools in the past (middle school no less), so I have learned to let things roll off my back for the most part. One time I was helping out supervising kids in the cafeteria on the last week of school, and luckily I was in the big middle pathway between two large groups of tables, and I noticed some kids starting to duck under the tables, b/c a few seconds later suddenly all the kids threw their food and ran out. Mass chaos in seconds. The vice prinicpal on duty was in shock and very angry. It was like a scene from Animal House! I was one of the few lucky adults who didn't get any food on me.


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