87Sigfried87

World record of pirouettes:36!!!!

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I was watching some ballet videos on you tube,always surprised of the big amount of them available,and got shocked by the video of this GIRL doing 36pirouettes.They say it's not fake and it's the world record.They are not perfect pirouettes,they're not with passé endehors but....36!!!and I've always thought that boys are more gifted in pirouettes!I also wonder if she dances somewhere,in a company or what else and what type of training she follows to have such turns('cause i'd follow it myself;-))....she is not human maybe :bow:

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I've seen that. It's a trick and she's utilizing a little square of low-friction material called a "turnboard" under her supporting foot to keep the turn going. Still, thirty-six is quite a number, but you should stop the video frame by frame and analyze how many times she shifts her placement to correct for various off-balances.

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This girl was a student of mine...she comes from a competition dance studio. Even in ballet class her turns were just so on, maybe not classically correct, but very on her leg. When I was a teacher there, all the students in her level took ballet, jazz, hip hop, pointe, tumbling, lyrical, modern, etc.

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I've seen that. It's a trick and she's utilizing a little square of low-friction material called a "turnboard" under her supporting foot to keep the turn going. Still, thirty-six is quite a number, but you should stop the video frame by frame and analyze how many times she shifts her placement to correct for various off-balances.

I supposed it was made with a turnboard...i use it myself but I can get to 10 pirouettes...my friend,who's very good at turning can get to 22 pirouettes with it...but 36 it means that she has 15 turns at least without turnboard!!!!

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Put a ball bearing in the pointe shoe and you could do even more :bow:

Seriously, Mel's point about placement cannot be overemphasized. These should be PIROUETTES which are not TURNS. There's a difference.

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I'm overwhelmed by curiosity about this.

First of all, where can we find this video on YouTube?

What is the point of this kind of activity? Does it increase one's marketability in the professional dance world? Is it just for fun? Lust for fame? Or what?

To put this in context, what are the goals of "competition dance studios"? What kind of training and motivating would we observe if we visited one?

If the young woman is actually changing her body positioning to gain momentum and keep balance during this exercise, wouldn't it still qualify as a variety of turn -- although not technically the kind of turn called pirouette?

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First of all, where can we find this video on YouTube?
"36 pirouettes" pulls it up. :)
If the young woman is actually changing her body positioning to gain momentum and keep balance during this exercise, wouldn't it still qualify as a variety of turn -- although not technically the kind of turn called pirouette?
Sure, but not necessarily one one that would get you a spot in the corps de ballet. You'll find the girl's name on the first clip, which enables you to find others of her, and you'll see she is primarily a tap dancer (she even performs the pirouette in tap shoes).

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What is the point of this kind of activity? Does it increase one's marketability in the professional dance world? Is it just for fun? Lust for fame? Or what?

I think it comes under the general heading of "goofing around".

To put this in context, what are the goals of "competition dance studios"? What kind of training and motivating would we observe if we visited one?

The overall goal of "competition studios" is to rack up trophies for the studio waiting room. The standard of training is from fair to downright abominable. There would be a lot of the aforementioned goofing, often as part of class, and nothing that might hurt the delicate self-esteem of the students, many of whom have the ego structure of a rhinoceros.

If the young woman is actually changing her body positioning to gain momentum and keep balance during this exercise, wouldn't it still qualify as a variety of turn -- although not technically the kind of turn called pirouette?

In ballet terminology, it's really a pretty fair pirouette de caractère.

And the physics that allow so many turns using the turnboard is rather different from the sort that produces ballet pirouettes. There is a variable for the coefficient of friction that has to enter the equation, and in the case of a turnboard, the number is very low.

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Thanks, carbro and Mel, for your clear and to-the-point answers. :)

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Kind of reminds me of what one used to say: That and a token would get you on a subway. (dating myself oh dear...)

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I'm overwhelmed by curiosity about this.What is the point of this kind of activity? Does it increase one's marketability in the professional dance world? Is it just for fun? Lust for fame? Or what?

We're just one step away from adding the new category "ballet" to the sports field. As i stated in a previous post, i can't wait to see the black swan in the future Olympic Games...and with no tutus...maybe they are soon to be considered too old fashion and an obstacle to show off the next world goal: 88 pirouettes..how does that sound...? What do you think Taglioni, Pavlova, Fonteyn, Danilova, Makarova, Alonso, Farrell...? :)

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Kind of reminds me of what one used to say: That and a token would get you on a subway. (dating myself oh dear...)

I can't imagine trying to count to 36 while my head is spinning around like that! Holy smokes. What a trick. She would surely pick up a lot of small change by doing that in the subway here. Equally or perhaps even more valuable is the youtube footage of Aria Alekzander doing a half dozen pirouttes while she pulls off her yellow dress over her head. No kidding. Search her name with spin cycle, and it comes up. She would surely pick up the gold medal in any competitive pirouette olympics, but only if there was a little dog racing around her en dedans.

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Kind of reminds me of what one used to say: That and a token would get you on a subway. (dating myself oh dear...)

I can't imagine trying to count to 36 while my head is spinning around like that! Holy smokes. What a trick. She would surely pick up a lot of small change by doing that in the subway here. Equally or perhaps even more valuable is the youtube footage of Aria Alekzander doing a half dozen pirouttes while she pulls off her yellow dress over her head. No kidding. Search her name with spin cycle, and it comes up. She would surely pick up the gold medal in any competitive pirouette olympics, but only if there was a little dog racing around her en dedans.

another who whips off immense numbers of turns with consistent ease is Adeline Pastor. From what I can tell she seems to be a bit of a one trick pony, but its a pretty impressive trick! I found her when looking up Sarabia video's after reading about him here.

there is one video on youtube devoted to her pirouetting skills--it has HORRIBLE music, but lots of pirouettes and fouettes.

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I'm overwhelmed by curiosity about this.What is the point of this kind of activity? Does it increase one's marketability in the professional dance world? Is it just for fun? Lust for fame? Or what?

We're just one step away from adding the new category "ballet" to the sports field. As i stated in a previous post, i can't wait to see the black swan in the future Olympic Games...and with no tutus...maybe they are soon to be considered too old fashion and an obstacle to show off the next world goal: 88 pirouettes..how does that sound...? What do you think Taglioni, Pavlova, Fonteyn, Danilova, Makarova, Alonso, Farrell...? :)

Well,i guess it's the same with the hyper extended legs of gymnasts....fascinating....I'd like to have such legs and such pirouettes...i would be a very good dancer,but i wouldn't maybe be an artist,if i didn't have something else.Etoiles are not famous only for the techinque or for their bodies or gifts...If you pay for a ticket you want to see something else a part from legs and turns(imagine 3hours of turns and legs!!!!),but if you have a big gift in something it makes the difference between being a normal dancer and an special one.Do you think Guillem would have become what she is now,without her 200°legs or Tamara Rojo without her pirouettes etc?ballet is not a sport only because there is(fortunately!) a lot of importance focused on the artistic part.

Comparing the old type of ballet to the new one is always senseless.Taglioni did 45° arabesques because the technique was so...But would you like to see her arabesque in a performance nowadays?I'd not.

I posted this because i was quite shocked by her pirouettes...this doesn't mean that i consider her a great dancer and that i'd pay to go and see her

;-)

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another who whips off immense numbers of turns with consistent ease is Adeline Pastor. From what I can tell she seems to be a bit of a one trick pony, but its a pretty impressive trick! [ ... ]

there is one video on youtube devoted to her pirouetting skills--it has HORRIBLE music, but lots of pirouettes and fouettes.

I know that this is :) , but I watched several of the Pastor videos -- including one extended variation danced when she was eleven.

Many of you are expert in ballet training. What do you think about these early videos in terms of the age of the dancer? Is the attempt to produce a simulation of adult ballerina technique appropriate to the age? Is this approach becoming the norm? What are the benefits -- and the dangers -- of this kind of early training?

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Taglioni did 45° arabesques because the technique was so...But would you like to see her arabesque in a performance nowadays?I'd not.

I would pay what i don't have just to be able to see Taglioni...even if doing a motionless romantic pose... :)

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In my opinion, if the dancer really does have the ability, there is no reason for them to not do the step; however, they must be carefully taught when it is appropriate, and that it must always suit the music. They must also continue to develop other aspects of their technique and not focus on one step or style to the exclusion of others.

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