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Posted (edited)

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/27/theater/carousel-revival-agnes-de-milles-broadway.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Farts&action=click&contentCollection=arts&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=3&pgtype=sectionfront

Justin Peck is choreographing the revival of Carousel.   However, the producers will start crediting Agnes De Mille as well, after objections from her estate representatives.

Edited by abatt

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"Agnes de Mille, who had nothing to do with this production, dance or otherwise, did the choreography for the original production."

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I'm sure she'll be credited only as the choreographer of the original production. I'm assuming the agreement is for credit, and nothing monetary is required.

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On 3/27/2018 at 12:02 PM, Helene said:

"Agnes de Mille, who had nothing to do with this production, dance or otherwise, did the choreography for the original production."

According to the article, de Mille's estate is merely asking the producers to adhere to an old agreement by de Mille and Rodgers & Hammerstein that her contribution to the original production be acknowledged with a credit by future productions.  It seems more than appropriate that her contributions to the landmark nature of the original show continue to be recognized.

A review by Marina Harss for DanceTabs.

Quote

Peck has done a truly fine job with the dances. There’s something old-fashioned about them, too. The choreography for the original show was by Agnes de Mille, and Peck has captured some of that classic American choreographer’s down-home spirit. The main vocabulary is ballet, but there’s nothing rarefied or pretentious about it. There are happy couple dances with quick, low lifts, and the ensemble moves in waves and chains and ingenious formations. The sailor dance is a triumph, with hints of hornpipe and a soft-shoe that plays around with the rhythms in the music. To the famous “Carousel Waltz,” Peck has created a neat pattern of concentric circles within which the women become both the horses and the riders. All of Peck’s usual skills (dexterity with the ensemble, great use of stage space, quick, clean patterning) are put to use here, creating a sense of energy and joy.
 

 

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