pbl

Name the step (from video links)

35 posts in this topic

Mel Johnson informed us once somewhere that the step was named after a count at court who was particularly good at them... But I forget the details...

I don't know the count story, but in French sissonne means "split," which also seems apt for that movement.

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Google translate isn't pulling that up for me... But it does suggest a noun "scission" for split... Could Sissonne be a corruption? There is an area in France called Sissonne... where presumably the count was from...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sissonne

There exists also a Pas de Ciseaux, the scissors step... one would imagine there is a relation between "scission" and "scissors" and yet it is spelled "ciseaux". Truly material ripe for much confusion...

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This group is such a great resource for those of us just beginning to learn about ballet. Thank you.

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I don't know what the turning chugs at 10:04 are called... I don't know what to call a jump that doesn't really loft into the air...

I went back a few entries when this thread re-emerged, and found your query -- I've always heard them referred to as arabesque voyage, and thought the idea of an arabesque taking a little trip was so sweet...

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I don't know what the turning chugs at 10:04 are called... I don't know what to call a jump that doesn't really loft into the air...

I went back a few entries when this thread re-emerged, and found your query -- I've always heard them referred to as arabesque voyage, and thought the idea of an arabesque taking a little trip was so sweet...

Isn't the arabesque voyage the movement for the corps starting at 6:03 where they scootch across the stage in lines in arabesque?

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Yes, going on a voyage is do much more picturesque than just travelling arabesque...

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I was also taught sissonnes--or sissonnes en arabesque en avant for this particular case--perhaps with ferme to failli as well

but I would say arabesques voyagees are what we see Myrtha do in Giselle or the ballerina do backwards in Tchaik Pas?

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I was also taught sissonnes--or sissonnes en arabesque en avant for this particular case--perhaps with ferme to failli as well

but I would say arabesques voyagees are what we see Myrtha do in Giselle or the ballerina do backwards in Tchaik Pas?

Yes. At 10:04 Giselle does tours a l'italienne. Arabesques voyagees travel in a line.

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I know that this thread has been dormant for a while, but I'm hoping to revive it with a few new questions...

Can anyone identify the name of the turn/leap Roberto Bolle does between 2:16:38 and 2:16:45 in the following video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9gIDiUSdug

Also... during a pirouette or pique turn, if the dancer's toe (of the raised leg) crosses the knee of the standing leg, is that poor technique -- or artistic choice? For example, in the following video, you can see the "crossover" at approximately 45:37. It looked odd to me, but I'm not really sure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-a4HjwuuEs

thanks a lot!

Sasha

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I believe that jump is called coupé jeté en attitude.

As to the foot in passé it's what is called over-crossed and is technically incorrect. The box of the pointe shoe should be just under the knee on the inside of the standing leg - only crossed about half way on the standing leg. Sometimes in supported pirouettes there's a fear of the passé leg's knee hitting the partner and one tends to over-cross.

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