Jump to content


Kennedy Center 2013


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 dancemom101

dancemom101

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 05:48 AM

According to the Kennedy Center's website: http://www.kennedy-c...Genre&genre=BAL


American Ballet Theatre
Apr. 9 - 14, 2013 | On Sale 2/6/13
American Ballet Theatre continues to prove "why dance is not a luxury or a frill but a necessity of life" (The Washington Post) with Petipa's tale of dashing pirates and kidnapped maidens, Le Corsaire, and a mixed repertory program.

#2 Natalia

Natalia

    Rubies Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,394 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:07 AM

Thanks! We already began a thread for the ABT KC season here...maybe combine?
http://balletalert.i...er-spring-2013/

It certainly sounds like an exciting season. I hope that the new sets/costumes for Corsaire are as rich and gorgeous as those seen in the DVD. At least the boat seems bigger than the 1990s ABT one, in photos! (But nobody can top the size of the current Bolshoi boat, which fills the stage, looking almost as big as an aircraft carrier. "Bolshoi" means "big," after all.)

#3 dancemom101

dancemom101

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts

Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:27 AM

Oops, so sorry about that. If someone can combine, then please do.

#4 Dale

Dale

    Emeralds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,034 posts

Posted 04 January 2013 - 02:08 PM

Casting is starting to go up.

http://www.kennedy-c...ts/?event=BNBSE

#5 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 04 January 2013 - 02:39 PM

Is it possible to get great seats for ABT at KC without becoming a member, since member tickets go on sale first?

#6 cinnamonswirl

cinnamonswirl

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:36 AM

puppytreats, it really depends on the program (and what you consider great seats). What are you trying to see?

I imagine Cosaire will sell better than the mixed rep, especially since it's got the weekend matinees. Also if there are Russian dancers cast, the DC area Russian contingent comes out full force - I bet tickets for the Sunday matinee with Osipova/Vasiliev will go quickly.

#7 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

puppytreats, it really depends on the program (and what you consider great seats). What are you trying to see?

I imagine Cosaire will sell better than the mixed rep, especially since it's got the weekend matinees. Also if there are Russian dancers cast, the DC area Russian contingent comes out full force - I bet tickets for the Sunday matinee with Osipova/Vasiliev will go quickly.


I am not interested in "Corsaire". I actually think I am getting a ticket O/V's Corsaire in my Met subscription and I will have to trade or sell it. A cheerful ballet about an auction of sex slaves actually unnerves me, even if the costumes and choreography are pretty. While Medora convinces Conrad to release his slaves, this does not affect the market or its other participants. I don't really understand why reviewers attack the supposed ethnic stereotypes in "Corsaire", but do not comment about the slave auction. (Then again, I don't understand how "Spartacus" is discussed by critics as pro-revolutionary, when the emporer defeats the slave insurrection. I have similar feelings about the writings of critics in the face of my interpretation of other ballets, such as Balanchine's "Orpheus" or Tharp's "In the Upper Room", aspects of which, to me, are disturbing.)

In addition, I know Ivan Vasiliev has a lot of fans, as well he should. I admire his leaps, his strength, his fire, his energy, and his good cheer. However, I thought a key aspect of ballet was about creating an appearance of control, beauty, and harmony. In the lengthy clip of "Valencia" that I saw on YT, he appeared to lack control to some degree, which did not generate a graceful or elegant portrait for me. At the ABT gala, his energetic performance excited the audience, but his anger at his fall was apparent. I guess he may have sacrificed placement or precision for height and speed. His style of dance is fun to see sometimes, but it is not my preference when I am sitting in a theatre. I have not seen much of his work, so I am not in a position to judge his talent or his overall abilities. However, I would prefer to spend my money to see some other performances.

To answer your question about tickets, in general, I prefer the front of the orchestra. However, I bought binoculars after seeing POB's "Giselle" from the upper level, and have enjoyed seeing Balanchine from the rafters. For ABT's dramatic ballets, I prefer to see faces generally. To me, the emotional impact of a dramatic ballet is not the same from afar. However, I may try a less costly alternative in D.C., especially since I may attend with others.

#8 Drew

Drew

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,235 posts

Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:09 PM

OT.: Puppytreats--I am puzzled by your remarks about Spartacus. Karl Marx--who, whatever his faults, was pretty serious about revolution--is on record as having admired the historical Spartacus and Soviet artists/intellectuals followed suit. Spartacus' defeat doesn't change the "pro-revolution" cast of the story if one tells it or interprets it as a story of heroism defeated by tyranny. Especially if one assumes that its function is to inspire future revolutionaries who may do better. The Bolsheviks themselves took inspiration from the defeated Paris Commune. Uh...as for Grigorovich's choreography...that I have no defense for, though when well danced, the ballet ranks high on my guilty pleasure list.

#9 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 08 January 2013 - 08:14 PM

OT.: Puppytreats--I am puzzled by your remarks about Spartacus. Karl Marx--who, whatever his faults, was pretty serious about revolution--is on record as having admired the historical Spartacus and Soviet artists/intellectuals followed suit. Spartacus' defeat doesn't change the "pro-revolution" cast of the story if one tells it or interprets it as a story of heroism defeated by tyranny. Especially if one assumes that its function is to inspire future revolutionaries who may do better. The Bolsheviks themselves took inspiration from the defeated Paris Commune. Uh...as for Grigorovich's choreography...that I have no defense for, though when well danced, the ballet ranks high on my guilty pleasure list.


The characterization is not sympathetic to the emperor or his court, but the defeat can be read as a warning against insurrection, and can render one hopeless, rather than inspired. In contrast, the story of Moses leading the exodus of the slaves from Egypt into freedom, even though the generation that left Egypt did not enter the promised land, seems hopeful. Stories about rewards in the afterlife offer hope, even in the face of death.

Maybe the ballet deemed death itself as heroic because it was superior to slavery, and the insurrection itself constituted an heroic statement in favor of self-determination and dignity. Bravery and courage are inspiring and can be heroic, and maybe the sacrifice of the life of Spartacus was justified by freedom of subsequent generations who followed his example, but I did not see evidence of that in the ballet.

#10 lmspear

lmspear

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 164 posts

Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:14 AM

Is it possible to get great seats for ABT at KC without becoming a member, since member tickets go on sale first?


It is possible, although unpredictable, to score great seats at the KenCen at any time up until the curtain rises. Exchanged subscriber/member tickets go back into the general inventory and can be released at any time. Sold tickets that cannot be used or exchaged can be donated back to be resold, with the donor getting acknowledgment for a charitable contribution for tax purposes.


If you go online to purchase your tickets, there is a pick your own seat option which displays a seating map of the theater where you select your seats by clicking on them.



#11 cinnamonswirl

cinnamonswirl

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 304 posts

Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:21 AM

Puppytreats, it sounds like you want to attend the mixed bill then. Typically there are lots of seats for the second night of the mixed bill if it on a weeknight (as this is).

#12 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:15 PM


OT.: Puppytreats--I am puzzled by your remarks about Spartacus. Karl Marx--who, whatever his faults, was pretty serious about revolution--is on record as having admired the historical Spartacus and Soviet artists/intellectuals followed suit. Spartacus' defeat doesn't change the "pro-revolution" cast of the story if one tells it or interprets it as a story of heroism defeated by tyranny. Especially if one assumes that its function is to inspire future revolutionaries who may do better. The Bolsheviks themselves took inspiration from the defeated Paris Commune. Uh...as for Grigorovich's choreography...that I have no defense for, though when well danced, the ballet ranks high on my guilty pleasure list.


The characterization is not sympathetic to the emperor or his court, but the defeat can be read as a warning against insurrection, and can render one hopeless, rather than inspired. In contrast, the story of Moses leading the exodus of the slaves from Egypt into freedom, even though the generation that left Egypt did not enter the promised land, seems hopeful. Stories about rewards in the afterlife offer hope, even in the face of death.

Maybe the ballet deemed death itself as heroic because it was superior to slavery, and the insurrection itself constituted an heroic statement in favor of self-determination and dignity. Bravery and courage are inspiring and can be heroic, and maybe the sacrifice of the life of Spartacus was justified by freedom of subsequent generations who followed his example, but I did not see evidence of that in the ballet.


I received this in the mail today:

"Tune into Starz for the final chapter, Spartacus: War of the Damned. Premieres January 25 at 9 p.m. EST. (emphasis added)
And because The NEW Spartacus Workout on DVD, you can get gladiator fit in your living room, basement, and just about anywhere else you have 6 feet of open space."

War of the Damned - is the title tragic, defeatist, cautionary, or inspirational, Drew? It reminds me of Das Boat.

[Please forgive my miserable mood.]

#13 Drew

Drew

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,235 posts

Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

I'll go out on a limb and speculate that the executives at Starz care more about ratings than revolution Posted Image .

I can only get to the Kennedy Center during the weekend in any case. So if I fly up for something it will be Corsaire not Ratmansky/Shostakovitch (a pairing that greatly interests me but whose 'political' implications are themselves not altogether easy to interpret).

Hope your mood lightens soon puppytreats...


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):