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Giselle from Hell


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#61 leibling

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Posted 17 March 2002 - 12:25 AM

That idea is similar to my yearly Nutcracker fantasy- that the mice will finally win the battle and we can all go home for act 2- or maybe to the land of CHEESE!!! biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif

#62 CygneDanois

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Posted 23 February 2001 - 05:04 PM

How about a bisexual Giselle who is torn between Albrecht (male) and Hilary (female)? As for lesbians, well, there are those two demi-soloist wilis in the second act. Alexandra's idea of Bathilde and Myrtha being the same person works well. But why don't we set it in Spanish Harlem and choreograph to Ricky Martin and Santana? The royal court could be Giuliani and his officials. "Gisela" likes to go clubbing, but "Bertrada" her mother, says all those drugs aren't good for her, and if she keeps taking them, she'll eventually be sent to rehab.

One night at the club, Gisela sees "Alberto" with "Batilda," New York City royalty, and overdoses. Gets sent to rehab.

Alberto visits her there and tries to get her out, but he is clearly high, and the nurses try desperately to keep him in, too. However, he threatens to take legal action, and they must relent. He leaves, and tries to take comfort in the fact that the relapse rate for people in such situations as Gisela is ridiculously high.

Wow. I can't believe that trashiness came out of my own head. I'll have to appoint a " Balletic Integrity Police" for myself if I'm ever an AD Posted Image.

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CygneDanois

#63 CygneDanois

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Posted 23 February 2001 - 11:46 PM

Alexandra, that may be quite simply the most frightening thing I have heard in years.

Note to all ADs who may be reading the board: Do not, repeat, DO NOT look at this thread as inspiration Posted Image.

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CygneDanois

#64 CygneDanois

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Posted 26 February 2001 - 09:23 PM

Cargill, I have also wondered what the stories behind Moyna and Zulma are. Maybe they're related to Myrtha.

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CygneDanois

#65 LMCtech

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Posted 16 March 2002 - 05:56 PM

I'm surprised no one has come up with this idea.
At the end of Act I, Giselle goes crazy, takes Albrecht's sword and...kills him (afterwards she and fiance high five and break into the wine).

Act II opens, all the wilis are now Willys, men who have been killed by wives/fiances/girlfriends for infidelity. This would take care of Alexandra's suggestions for more male solos.

(Actually I expect it to be Matthew Bourne's next project. Maybe he can recycle those goofy pants from Swan Lake.)

#66 Danielle DeVor

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Posted 10 March 2002 - 10:46 PM

Why not combine Giselle with a production of the silent film Nosferatu. Albrecht could be Harker, or even Renfield. The willies could be the vampire brides. And Hilarion could be Nosferatu himself. Complete with a sndtk by the vampire band Type O Negative. Though using specially created songs for the production unlike the dub job they did when they matched the silent film to Type O Negative music that was never intended for the purpose.

#67 Autumn7

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Posted 25 February 2002 - 07:30 PM

And in a whole other different direction there's Act II with the Willies (mispelled on purpose to take on a literal meaning)hopping across the stage in cowboy boots wearing red beards and braids carrying guitars. Red, white & blue bandannas cover them instead of the misty shrouds. The music is, of course, 'Blue Eyes Cryin' in the Rain' or 'Crazy (for loving you)'

#68 Henrik

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Posted 26 February 2002 - 04:53 AM

im frightened! Giselle is such a fine ballet... Drugs and drag in giselle... what is the world coming to? smile.gif

[ February 26, 2002: Message edited by: Henrik ]



#69 Paul Parish

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Posted 25 February 2002 - 02:42 AM

Alexandra

Again, it's a fantastic thread, and your correspondents have outdone themselves... I've emailed the link to countless friends...

SOmebody mentioned obliquely the Preljocaj ROmeo and Juliet with the Doberman. I went and reread the review I wrote of that -- it ran in the Daily Californian, Berkeley, in 1995; I still have it on disk, and have pasted it in below.

If you'd like you may post this as is or edit it to suit or not use it at all -- it's not really in keeping with the thread, but it's a fairly detailed account of a production many people may not have seen...

ALl the best,
PAul

Ballet from Hell

by

Paul PArish

the Lyons Opera Ballet is back, and not since they danced their wonderful Cinderella here in 1988 has the Zellerbach Hall stage been so transformed. Their orchestra filled the pit and spilled over onto the apron, where kettle drums and batteries of percussion instruments covered the proscenium piers and made the bunker-like walls of Verona seem to grow right out of the building. The whole stage was exposed, all the way to the back doors and all the way up to the rafters, where the lighting instruments shone like stars in the night sky.

We were, it turned out, trapped in this arena and in for a beating; from the slow rise of the dove grey curtain till its fall on the image pictured above (see photo), there was no intermission, and no escaping this brilliantly choreographed S&M scene. ALthough all my friends loved it, Angelin Preljocaj's ROmeo and Juliet literally made me sick.

The Lyons Opera House is one of the most dynamic arts institutions in Europe, and their appearances here have been long-anticipated highlights of the United Nations arts festival (which celebrates the signing of the U. N. Charter in San Francisco fifty years ago this month.)

This Romeo and Juliet, which many people find a stirring tribute to the suffering in the former Yugoslavia (Prelcocaj is from that region), is running in repertory with two operas (The Love for Three Oranges and Madama Butterfly), and a mixed dance bill, which opens in Zellerbach tonight and features the hot American choreographers Bill T Jones, Susan Marshall, and Stephen Petronio. It's altogether a very impressive offering.

People who like this R&J say it reflects the grim world of today. I think that's confused; in grim times, you protect the things you love and resist the brutes. What kind of Romeo and Juliet is it in which Tybalt doesn't get killed? Preljocaj has imposed a concept and cut away a great deal that doesn't fit. Half the music is gone, all the parents, Juliet's nurse, the duke, most of the story. (Romeo isn't even there when Tybalt kills Mercutio; so Romeo's not banished, and two ludicrous duennas catch Romeo and Juliet screwing, since he doesn't have to flee. But she takes the potion anyway. Go figure.)

Worse, Preljocaj has left the characters with no intelligence or greatness of heart. It's as if he'd dissevered everything above the cerebellum and left us only reptilian-stem behavior.

WHat's undeniably fascinating is the way the dancers move. Juliet's first solo is dazlingly constructed -- small swivels make huge differences, you see her from marvellous angles, the light just flashes off her. You want to know more (though you never get it).

THe preening macho thugs probably come off best. Prokofieff's score can get ugly when it needs to, and Prelcocaj finds large, sudden, technically stunning moves for them. Tybalt is brilliantly characterised. So are Romeo and his sidekicks -- in fact, their dance is a joy, like a trio of kids on skateboards. It's virtuosic, high-spirited, the hardest steps in the book tossed off in the spirit of people who own nothing in life but the bodies they live in and get high on their own co-ordination.

THe ball scene is even amusingly nasty, like a Michael Jackson video. Preljocaj didn't lose me till the balcony scene, which is bitterly disappointing. THis is radiant music -- but Preljocaj's cleverness doesn't cokme close to meeting the expressive demands of the music. They could be any kids stumbling through a great ****. It's downhill from there. At the end, Tybalt is patrolling the ramparts with a Doberman. The Doberman, and all the dancers, performed magnificently.

#70 Paul Parish

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Posted 26 February 2002 - 10:04 PM

you guys slay me.... Mussell, that's fantastic.

Comparisons are odorous, so I'll just say it's up there with Cygne's astounding tale....
Paul

#71 Alexandra

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Posted 24 December 2002 - 08:02 PM

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