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What are you reading this fall?


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#16 Garyecht

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 12:06 PM

Just returned from the library, where I picked up 3 books of short stories—one by Joyce Carol Oates, one by Thomas Wolfe, and the third a collection that, quite frankly, I can’t remember. In my old age I’m regressing back to childhood and have to have my bedtime story. Only problem is that I usually fall asleep before finishing.

Just recently I realized how much my math and physics skills have deteriorated, so I’m starting to read some math and physics books, popular books rather than textbooks. Nothing really heavy duty. My mind needs the exercise.

Every season I make it a point to read some dance related book. This fall, however, I have absolutely nothing in mind. I’m considering getting a Spanish dance how-to, history, or even dictionary because I’m going to take up Spanish dance next year. Thinking about reading Doris Humphrey’s autobiography too. Just scanning the Princeton Book Company catalogue, the following are possibilities: Moving Music: dialogues with music in twentieth century ballet; Inside Tap (want to do that also). I don’t know. To be honest, I’m not that enthusiastic about dance as a subject for reading. If I had to make a choice right now, I’d get Doris Humphrey’s autobiography.

This last summer, I read quite a few art history books and will probably continue. Those I get from the library. I tend to bring home those with relatively many pictures and few words.

For pure guilty pleasure, right now I’m hot for Perry Mason stories. Though I’m a slow reader, they are a fast read and once I get one home, I am glued to the couch until I finish.

#17 scoop

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Posted 23 September 2003 - 12:17 PM

I picked up a novel at the beach this summer that I never got to -- "The Four Temperaments" -- which I hope will survive the change of seasons. Ie, seems like the kind of book you might enjoy on the beach but maybe not otherwise! I seem to recall not-glowing things about it on previous threads but picked it up anyway since it was written by a former SAB student and thought it might have interesting scenes, etc., from that world.

The book I really want to read, though, is "Triangle: The Fire That Changed America," by David von Drehle, who is a superb newspaper writer (at The Washington Post). It's about a fire in a sweatshop in New York in 1911 that killed about 150 workers, mostly young immigrant women, and led to much political and social reform.

#18 Farrell Fan

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Posted 24 September 2003 - 08:20 AM

I just bought Garison Keillor's new novel, "Love Me," and I am, indeed, loving it. It's about a once-famous, successful writer of fiction who used to pal around with William Shawn, and is now a newspaper advice columnist. I realize that Keillor is not a writer to everyone's taste, but I'm awfully glad I acquired the taste.

Of course I'm looking forward in November to the book about Balanchine with photos by Costas.

#19 dirac

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 01:48 PM

I always liked Keillor's piece, "Shy Rights: Why Not Pretty Soon?"

#20 Funny Face

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 03:35 PM

I'm very impressed, vagansmom, that your husband attended St. John's. Wish more colleges had that kind of program.

Among my required reading for school this semester is "The Hydrogen Economy -- The Creation of the Worldwide Energy Web and the Redistribution of Power on Earth" by Jeremy Rifkin.

For my b-day this week I received "Me Talk Pretty One Day" by David Sedaris. Each passage can be read in a few minutes -- perfect before bed.

Also reading Faith Sullivan's "What A Woman Must Do." Enjoy Sullivan's work, including "The Cape Ann" and "The Empress of One."

Was also given recently 'The Book That Changed My Life," wherein "fifteen of America's most influential authors discuss their own special literary choices."

Waiting for Fannie Flagg's next venture, whatever it may be -- loved "Standing in the Rainbow."

Any poetry readers out there?

#21 BW

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 04:52 PM

I am finally reading Henning Kronstam: Portrait of a Danish Dancer
by Alexandra Tomalonis. It's beautifully written. I will write more after I finish it.

#22 K8smom

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 06:54 PM

You all are eruditer than me :wink: ...I am so impressed. People who still read! I just finished Standing in the Rainbow, and Hillary Clinton's book (a birthday gift from my conservative Republican parents - they love me) and I'm searching for something else to read. I haven't seen any mention of Dorothy Dunnett. Has anyone read her? I've read both of her (long) series more than once, and am contemplating wading in again, but I'm not sure I have that kind of time. Also, I'm thinking of trying some of the classics that I DIDN'T have to read in college...any suggestions?

Funny Face - I gave my son "Me Talk Pretty One Day", but haven't read it myself. Maybe I should.

#23 Funny Face

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Posted 25 September 2003 - 07:34 PM

The classics you didn't read in college ... good one. We've all had a few escape us until later in life.

John Knowles' "A Separate Peace" made a big impression on me in my 20s. Anything by Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner. Read "Pride and Prejudice" and then see every film version ever done -- that's fun. Including "Bridge Jones's Diary," which will hit you halfway through the movie that it's actually a modern day take on P&P. And I highly recommend that all women, if they haven't already done so, read the entire Anne of Green Gables series right through the lives of Anne's children. Mark Twain said that no one penned better tales of childhood, and I quite agree. You'll end up feeling all's right with the world.

#24 vagansmom

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 05:41 PM

Just finished "Life of Pi". I must admit, I liked the book alot once I got into it but it's yet another book, ala "Atonement" with a twist at the end. I'm not sure I care for the twist this time though.

And now I've begun another book my daughter's begged me to read: Daniel Quinn's "Story of B". I hope to begin "Bel Canto" later this week if a friend remembers to send it along to me.

#25 K8smom

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 07:05 PM

Funny Face, I have read all of the "Anne" books, and loved them.

I didn't know that "Bridget Jones' Diary" (read the book, haven't seen the movie) was supposed to be Pride and Prejudice (I can't recall whether or not I've read P&P). Wasn't the movie Clueless supposed to be "Emma", or am I confused?

I've read both The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence. I'm trying to decide whether or not to try more of Wharton - I found both books fascinating, but depressing.


I'll check into Atonement, too, since it seems to be a winner.

#26 vagansmom

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 07:37 PM

Funny Face and K8sMom, I recently listened to the audiotape of the sequel to "Bridget Jones's Diary". It's very funny. The actress doing the reading is just perfect, I never enjoyed a book-on-tape more than this one. There's a very funny section in it where Bridget Jones interviews Colin Firth, the actor who plays Mr. Darcy in the "Pride and Prejudice" movie. Keep in mind that the very same actor plays Mark Darcy (get it?) in "Bridget Jones's Diary". It was very hard to pay attention to my driving while I was listening to that section.

I also adore the Anne of Green Gables books. I've read just about everything that L.M. Montgomery wrote. I was sad to read that she struggled greatly with depression throughout her life. If I remember correctly she was married to a rigid minister and the marriage wasn't a happy one.

#27 Funny Face

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 08:06 PM

Yes, isn't it sad that Mongtgomery's life couldn't be more like her books. I'm always gratified to know that at least Maud Hart Lovelace's life, both in childhood and adulthood, was closely related to her books ("Betsy and Tacy"). It makes me feel happier about those books, knowing that that kind of happiness did in fact exist.

The Bridget Jones/P&P analogy struck me mid-movie. Yes, I was aware that Colin Firth played both Darcys. And as the story unfolds, you become more aware of the similarities. But I had never actually read anything about the similarities, and felt I had discovered them by myself.

And yes, "Clueless" is supposed to be a modern day "Emma."

#28 Guest_Angel2Be_*

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 08:13 PM

Funny at the beginning, but quite sad (poignant) towards the end. :)

I've now finished The Nanny Diaries. You're right. :(
(To make it worse, a friend told me a false, happy ending to the story, and I was expecting resolution!)

I saw a Spanish copy of it at Barnes and Noble today and indulged.

#29 vagansmom

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 08:50 PM

Funny Face, The Betsy-Tacy books are still my all-time favorites! I loved them so much that someone gave me the complete hardcover set as a wedding present in 1976. That set is one of my most cherished possessions. Any member of my family, male and female, can recite entire passages by heart from those books.

I was so excited when the "Betsy-Tacy Companion" came out. All those photographs are priceless.

#30 K8smom

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 10:06 PM

Ah, yes, Betsy-Tacy! Kait and I both loved those books - but I didn't read them until after I bought them for her when she was small. I, too, was excited when the Betsy-Tacy Companion was published. I gave it to Kait for Christmas, feeling that she would really appreciate it. I found it fascinating, but she didn't - she didn't like seeing photos of the actual buildings, people, etc. She preferred to see everything in her mind's eye.

When she moved out, she took the series, but left the Companion. Maybe I'll "adopt" it :) .


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