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There are no English obituaries yet, but dozens of tributes in the Russian media. The great Bolshoi ballerina Nina Tiimofeeva has died, 3 November 2014.

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I am saddened to hear of the passing of Nina Timofeeva at the age of 80 having watched her performances on a good number of occasions.

Nina Vladimirovna Timofeeva was born in St.Petersburg on 11 June 1935 - 3 November 2014.

A graduate of the Vaganova Academy in 1953 having made her original theatrical debut as Masha in The Nutcracker in 1951.

From 1953 to 1956 she was a soloist with the Kirov Theatre and later became a soloist with the Bolshoi Ballet.

Her major roles were, Odette/Odile (1956), Kitri (1959), Mistress of the Copper Mountain in The Tale of the Stone Flower, Aurora(1964).Lilac Fairy(1977) both in The Sleeping Beauty, Mekhmene Banu in Legend of Love(1965), Phrygia (1958) and Aegina (1968) in Spartacus and Later in Molchanov's Macbeth(1950).

In 1980 she graduated from the Russian Academy of Arts and in 1989–91 worked as a choreographer of Bolshoi Theater. In 1991 she moved to Israel, together with her daughter Nadya, who is also a professional ballet dancer.

Two years later she published her memoirs, "The world of ballet history, creativity and memories."

"Terra" - "Terra". ISBN 978-5-85255-274-7.

Nina Timofeeva was married to the composer Kiril Molchanov.

Nina Timofeeva had technique in abundance which sometime split the Royal Opera House audience as to her qualities, but she became a truly firm favourite when in her very best roles.

Humble in nature, sweet in disposition, lovable.

SEE:-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaqouUlHX5M

http://wn.com/nina_timofeyeva

Edited: Due to memory lapse.

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Nina Timofeeva was truly one of a kind and she will be sorely missed.

May she rest in peace.

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Judith Cruickshank wrote an obituary for Nina Timofeyeva in "The Guardian":

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/nov/16/nina-timofeyeva?CMP=share_btn_tw

In Moscow she widened her repertory in the traditional classics and worked on her technique to the point at which, having been regarded simply as a strong, but cold, technician, she was able to bring a dramatic force to her roles. As the distinguished Soviet dance writer Yuri Slominsky put it, “she thinks first and foremost of dance imagery when creating her characters”. Among her coaches were the great ballerinas Galina Ulanova and Marina Semyonova.

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