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BalletNut

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Everything posted by BalletNut

  1. I apologize for any confusion, I just couldn't think of a more "conventional" way to describe them without picking on specific dancers. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited March 18, 2001).]
  2. Well, I'll try! It won't be easy, given my lack of technical expertise. But here goes: The Russian ballerina seems to represent what Alexandra called "the black line," judging by how domineering her stage presence is. The Italian ballerina looks like a parody of "icy-classical," [Alexandra again] the way she moves so slowly, with such premeditated perfection, usually at the expense of warmth or musicality. The French ballerina is most likely a soubrette. I hope that all made sense. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited March 17, 2001).]
  3. I know this is a little off topic, but I always thought that Tudor's Gala Performance looked more like a parody of female employ [sp?] than of national dance styles. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited March 16, 2001).]
  4. If young people--or any people, really-- don't like ballet, no hip-talking ad will change their opinion of it. Using a terrible analogy: you can call brussels sprouts M&Ms if you think it'll make people like them more, but it won't fool anybody into actually eating more brussels sprouts. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited March 04, 2001).]
  5. How about a helicopter? [it worked for Miss Saigon]
  6. How about a helicopter? [it worked for Miss Saigon]
  7. With respect to the score, I'd set it to 80s music--how perfect is "Total Eclipse of the Heart" All of the dancers would wear sequined spandex, and those pointe-sneakers in lieu of pointe shoes. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited February 23, 2001).]
  8. With respect to the score, I'd set it to 80s music--how perfect is "Total Eclipse of the Heart" All of the dancers would wear sequined spandex, and those pointe-sneakers in lieu of pointe shoes. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited February 23, 2001).]
  9. While combing through the paper a few days ago, I came upon an ad for SF Ballet's 2001 Season. It showed a pose from The Prodigal Son, with the caption "Drinking. Debauchery. A Real Bible Story." Now, I understand the need for attracting younger audiences to the ballet, especially given that the average age of SFB's audience hovers around 60, give or take a few. However, an ad campaign like this, however well-intentioned, is not the way to go. I am not trying to speak for my whole generation, but, being fairly young myself, I found them an insult to my intelligence. It isn't the ads themselves that bother me, but the idea that the only way to attract young whippersnappers is to talk down to them. And, judging from what I hear, the marketing of ballet in this matter seems pretty widespread--Atlanta Ballet's pushing R&J by saying "two ballet dancers die, what more could you want?" springs to mind. Since when does young equal ignorant? So, am I overreacting, or is this offensive to other people too?
  10. I miss just about all of the "greats" as I got into ballet long after they had all either retired or passed on. Especially Fonteyn, Nureyev, Kirkland, Antoinette Sibley, Suzanne Farrell, Karen Kain, Lynn Seymour, Galina Ulanova and Irina Kolpakova. Hearing about them on this board makes me feel like I really missed out. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited February 21, 2001).]
  11. I know that in SF many small and experimental dance troupes are livid about SFB because they think SFB is receiving too much money, especially given what some of them think about the politically incorrect aspects of ballet. Whether SFB has too much funding is up to debate; while the figures may be higher, ballet productions tend to cost more. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited February 19, 2001).]
  12. Even though Balanchine died a year after I was born, and I haven't ever seen NYCB, I am a big fan of his ballets, judging from their performances by SFB and on video. I think he was a genius, and his contributions to the world of dance and ballet cannot be denied. Unfortunately, a lot of people in the Bay Area seem to hold very negative views of him, especially in light of the Keefer ordeal, which I am sick of ranting about. Many columnists and feminists particularly(note: I consider myself to be a feminist, and I am anti-Keefer, so no flames please) seem to blame the prevalence of eating disorders in dancers on him, and this is generally the consensus on him among people who are familiar with him only in passing, and who most likely have never seen any of his ballets (or anybody's for that matter.) Again, as an audience member I have a very high opinion of Balanchine's ballets, and of him as an artist, regardless of any accusations that the "politically correct" may level against him and his dancers. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited February 01, 2001).]
  13. Wheeldon did a version of A Midsummer Night's dream for the Colorado Ballet, but I'm not sure if it was three acts. However, it is a story ballet, if that's what you were wondering.
  14. Kay Mazzo was a principal with NYCB in the 70s, and she created roles in Violin Concerto and other Balanchine works. She danced some of Farrell's roles when Farrell was gone, and was not quite as famous as other principals. Of course, this was all before I was born, so I never saw her dance. I don't know how this relates to Yvonne Borree, though. Can you elaborate on this, Lillian? [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited January 12, 2001).]
  15. I am almost afraid to suggest this adaptation as I am sure it's been done somewhere, but how about Charlie And The Chocolate Factory? I see many places where a choreographer could put in divertissements: after the mishaps of the Golden Ticket holders, perhaps, or something similar to The Nutcracker, with the dance of the Everlasting Gobstoppers, etc, etc. Maybe even a pas de cinq at the gates of the factory for the 5 children. Not to mention the ways in which one could portray a chocolate river or a Wonka-vator onstage. Sorry for butting in, but I just had to put it out there. [This message has been edited by BalletNut (edited October 20, 2000).]
  16. I love Giselle, and my favorite ballerinas in this role have been Makarova [especially in Act 2, judging by the 1977ish Lincoln Center video with Baryshnikov and Van Hamel] and also Yuan Yuan Tan and Joanna Berman in the new SFB production. All three seem to have "ideal" qualities. Makarova looks absolutely weightless in act 2, while Tan has a youthful innocence in her portrayal and Berman does the most heartbreaking mad scene. Of course, I know there are people who beg to differ, especially about the merits of the SFB production.
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