Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
BlackbirdBallerina

good variations

69 posts in this topic

Sizova performs all the usual Russian choreography, which is restrained, not technically dramatic. By the way, the cambré back is not a big one--just in the upper back, with the head inclined. It's not obvious; it's just a fuller use of the back than you would see with for example a British or Balanchine dancer. There is also a young Natalia Makarova dancing the bluebird pas de deux with Valery Panov on the same tape.

Share this post


Link to post

A positively pudgy young Natalia Makarova! :)

Share this post


Link to post

Alexandra, sorry, I do not the meaning of "pudgy" (English is not my first language!!)

Hans, I see what you are referring to: it is the use of the upper back which is so unique to the Russians, and which is linked to the "epaulement": they sort of detach their upper back from their lower back, and make movements flow from there, and giving them an "airy" look. I think that is the reason why their "swans" look so good.

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

pudgy = not thin, not quite "chubby" and certainly not "heavy" but not the very trim ballerina she would become.

Share this post


Link to post

Doesn't "pudgy" have a slightly negative connotation? I thought she looked beautiful! :)

Share this post


Link to post

If that's pudgy, I like it. She looks fantastic, IMO.

Silvy, that is exactly what I meant--isn't it amazing what Russians can do with their backs?

Share this post


Link to post

I agree with you a thousand per cent about the cambre -- ESPECIALLY in the first variation (THE ONE PRECEDING HTE rOSE ADAGIO) -- what makes those sauts de chats SO beautiful is hte cambre a the crest of hte leap - if it weren't Aurora, you'd think it was Kitri -- except that there's nothing peasant about it -- it is so elegant it looks natural(!!!) to see the head reach back like that at the top of the jump....

Share this post


Link to post

I think Sizova's back is one of the seven wonders of the ballet world:).

Share this post


Link to post

Ref Sizova: Does anyone know what has become of her?

Oh, her Corsaire when she was just a student was SO incredible

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

She is a teacher at the Universal Ballet Academy in Washington, DC. She is the most turned-out person I have ever seen, and I have some fun stories about her--like the time she was giving the girls a grand allegro combination and accidentally did a double assemblé en tournant (she's sixty-something years old) and then told her students (about 15-16 years old) not to try it because it was too difficult! She wasn't trying to be rude; she just meant they weren't yet advanced enough.

Share this post


Link to post

Hans

Thanks for your news - how lucky Sizova's students are!!!

How I wish I could see her in person, teaching class (or taking class with her - even better)

Speaking about "ballet backs", I also find Makhalina's another wonder in the ballet world!!!

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

I have another query.

I normally dance variations that demand balance on pointe, artistry, expressiveness as opposed to pyrotechnics (I am no virtuoso - sadly). For instance, I am currently dancing Corsaire (Medora's or Queen of Dryads), Don Q's second soloist (the one with the rond de jambes sur pointe), or Raymonda (first and third act), or Paquita's "harp", "Prelude" from "Les Sylphides".

It is years since I did a jumping variation (last time was the Mazurca from "Sylphides", since I have been experiencing trouble with my tendons. Now I feel better, and would like to try doing a big-jump variation (such as Gamzatti, or Don Q's first soloist). I wonder if in order to do a variation such as that you need a really HIGH jump (I am no Terekova, either, though I do jump, and I am "quick" as I am short).

thanks for feedback!!!

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

I don't think you need a really incredible jump to perform those variations, but if you are planning on performing them onstage, it would be preferable to have strong grand allegro. However, if you need to work on grand allegro, those variations would probably be good studio practice. Being good at pirouettes helps, too. Lots of consecutive doubles in those variations.

Share this post


Link to post

ok, you made me think when you suggested them as "studio practice" - after all, one has to look her best on performing!!

thanks for everything

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

i have found this thread rather overwhelming - probably because not all of these variations are known to me.

i think it seems to be full of good ideas, and personal experiences and recommendations. i couldn't help wondering if there is a way to sort them out a bit - a way to make the information in here a bit more accessible, to students (or teachers), who might want this information, in future?

i had thought to go through these posts and 'sort' them, somehow...but i'm not sure how, and i really don't have the time. maybe someone else has a bright idea how to do it, and maybe even the urge to follow-thru...?

for example, if i were a student wanting to choose a variation, but not having seen many of them, where would i start to even think about them? i think it might help, to perhaps divide the many posts here into the comments about:

- variations for the adagio, long-legged, lyrical dancer

- variations for the shorter/ jumpy-type/faster dancer

- variations for the good-turner

- any other ideas of how to do it?

of course, some variations might be on several lists...

i realise that many such variations combine diverse skills, but i DO think (speaking as a teacher, anyway) that it IS possible to categorise many of them, according to the MAIN skills needed...has anyone got any thoughts about this, and/or an urge to try to do it? ;)

Share this post


Link to post

I think it would probably require a moderator. What s/he could probably do, I think, would be to take comments relating to a particular type of variation as grace suggested above and place them in a new thread specifically for discussing that type of variation. Perhaps that would be more organized?

Share this post


Link to post

Referring to what both Grace and Hans are saying, I wud say that I'll second Hans's suggestion for a moderator to sort this out. Maybe to have a special category made for this, as a reference to students, teachers and dancers.

Also what Grace implies that some variations might "overlap" somehow. I remember that a teacher of mine (an ex dancer with the Marquis de Cuevas, and a prima ballerina in Uruguay) once said that tall dancers could not do quick variations, while short dancers could tackle both slow and quick variations. I, personally, am very short, but I love slow variations (maybe because I would like to look like Yulia Makhalina, but I am the opposite!!!)

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

Just would like to know if a new thread with classification of variations has been started!!!

thanks!!

silvy

Share this post


Link to post

Another question, just as important: Does anyone have the time to do all that work!? ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0