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Where to stay when attending PNB performancesHotels in Seattle


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#46 pherank

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:50 PM

 

I could live there, if it weren't for the weather.

Ah, the weather is one of the reasons I stay!

 

 

It's a perfect fit for you then. It's much the same thing in Alaska - some people really don't mind being cut off from civilization for much of the year - that's the point. I assume Seattle people really don't mind the wet and cold. I like a certain amount of actual seasons (which is why I so miss Northern Cal), but I couldn't deal with 7 month winters.



#47 Jayne

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:04 PM

Well, it's more like fall weather 7 months of the year - we really don't get much true mid-west style winter here.  But if you don't mind, please keep spreading your perspective about Seattle around - we want people to visit and then go home.  The prices are already out of control.  tiphat.gif



#48 sandik

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:45 PM

Well, it's more like fall weather 7 months of the year - we really don't get much true mid-west style winter here.  But if you don't mind, please keep spreading your perspective about Seattle around - we want people to visit and then go home.  The prices are already out of control.  tiphat.gif

Absolutely -- we prefer that people think it rains all the time here.  And that if you stand still too long, the moss grows on your north side.



#49 pherank

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 08:56 PM

 

Well, it's more like fall weather 7 months of the year - we really don't get much true mid-west style winter here.  But if you don't mind, please keep spreading your perspective about Seattle around - we want people to visit and then go home.  The prices are already out of control.  tiphat.gif

Absolutely -- we prefer that people think it rains all the time here.  And that if you stand still too long, the moss grows on your north side.

 

 

I've already got that problem with the moss growing, so in the sun I shall stay.  ;)



#50 Jack Reed

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:44 PM

Where can I get a quiet room?  Price matters, of course, but view doesn't.  A window on an inner court, as long as that court doesn't harbor noisy machinery, often ensures that this light sleeper gets  his rest in The City That Never Sleeps, on the other coast.  Good heavy windows can help a lot too, though I wonder whether this is as popular an idea in the Pacific Northwest, with its temperate temperatures, as it is in New York.  I've found that if you can see it - a congested street, or overnight truck traffic, or motorcycles - you can probably hear it loud and clear.  "Thick" walls between the rooms don't hurt, either, of course.   



#51 Helene

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:57 PM

I was always happy at the Mediterranean Inn, just a few blocks from Seattle Center, but you definitely don't want to be on the Queen Anne side, especially close to the front entrance above the taxi stand, where all morning long chirpy cab drivers bray starting at 5am. There isn't really a courtyard, but there is an inner quad, and I always found the rooms there very quiet.

I'm a very heavy sleeper, but I can't fall asleep where there is noise.

I also stayed at the MarQueen just a couple of blocks farther away in a quiet cavernous suite, but it was a special deal in the off-season.

#52 pherank

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:59 PM

Where can I get a quiet room?  Price matters, of course, but view doesn't.  A window on an inner court, as long as that court doesn't harbor noisy machinery, often ensures that this light sleeper gets  his rest in The City That Never Sleeps, on the other coast.  Good heavy windows can help a lot too, though I wonder whether this is as popular an idea in the Pacific Northwest, with its temperate temperatures, as it is in New York.  I've found that if you can see it - a congested street, or overnight truck traffic, or motorcycles - you can probably hear it loud and clear.  "Thick" walls between the rooms don't hurt, either, of course.   

 

Always bring earplugs. Always.  ;)

 

I didn't have noise issues with either The MarQueen or the Mediterranean Inn. But the MarQueen is probably more likely to have some noise since it is an old building, and the old wooden floors creak. But I didn't notice much noise from the sides or from above. The rooms are quite large, and they have their own kitchens. And given that a great 24 hour market is on the other side of the block (a 3 minute walk), you can save some money by buying yourself some groceries. The Mediterranean is a modern boutique hotel - small rooms, but I recall that they have microwaves and small refrigerators (the MarQueen has full-sized refrigerators, at least in most rooms). Both of these places can be considered within walking distance of the ballet.



#53 Jack Reed

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 05:05 PM

Oh, I always have earplugs handy - and if I forget them, there's usually a drugstore handy.  

 

But sometimes two lines of defense are helpful.  Thanks to you both - I wish creaky floors were the worst hotel noise I've had to put up with!  Neighbor's TV is the more usual problem, or furniture being nudged over bare floors sometimes.

 

I have friends who can sleep anywhere. *sigh*



#54 sandik

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 06:46 PM

You might also look at the Maxwell Hotel, which is a block from the theater and around three blocks from the grocery above (and indeed close to another decent grocery around three blocks in the other direction)  Since I live in Seattle, I don't spend much time in the hotels, but I used it for a conference a few years ago, and got no complaints from the conferees who stayed there.  No kitchen facilities in the bedrooms, though.

 

There's a Sheraton Four Points just beyond the other grocery, and a Holiday Inn Express nearby as well. (walking distance, but you have to get over/under Highway 99)



#55 Helene

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:17 PM

The rooms in the Mediterranean Inn are carpeted.  For some reason I'm remembering wooden floors at the MarQueen, but I could be imagining things.  pherank, do you remember?

 

If you end up in a central downtown hotel, you can take the monorail back and forth to Seattle Center, unless you want a late night, and then it's a short cab ride or a bus.  Based on what the Metro website says, despite 151,000 hours of service being dropped on 27 September, none of the impacted bus routes go from downtown to Seattle Center, and I don't see any cuts for LINK, the light rail that goes from the airport to downtown Seattle. 

 

Just know, if you haven't used light rail, it's at least a 1k walk through the north end airport parking garage to the machines where you buy a ticket, and then up the escalators to the platform.  If your plane lands on the south side of the airport -- international or A gates -- it's another almost 1k walk through the airport to get to the north end to start the trek to through the parking garage.  They decided everyone should have to do this, and killed the buses that ran from the south end of the airport to downtown, one of which was an express bus up I-5.  From downtown to Seattle Center, if you're staying at the Mediterranean Inn, the MarQueen, or the Maxwell you can take the D Rapid Transit bus to Republican stop (for the Mediterranean Inn) or the Mercer stop for the other two, and you'll be within a block of all but the Maxwell, which is another four or five blocks from either the Seattle Center West buses (D Rapid Transit, 1, 2) or the Seattle Center East buses (3, 4, ask the driver for the stop).  For the Sheraton Four Points, you'll want the Seattle Center East buses, or you'll be rolling your suitcase for a while (but at least mostly downhill).

 

Whether you take a bus to Seattle Center or the monorail, you have to come up from the bus tunnel at Westlake (end stop) and come to the surface.  The buses are on 3rd Avenue (walk to mountains and water, away from Nordstroms).  The monorail is at Westlake Center.  You can take the escalators through the Center or the elevators from the southwest corner of Westlake Center. 

 

The monorail will leave you a equidistant from all three hotels, but it will be a uphill incline to get to any of them.

 

You can't use a bus transfer on LINK light rail.  I'm not sure if this is true the other way around.



#56 pherank

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:47 PM

The rooms in the Mediterranean Inn are carpeted.  For some reason I'm remembering wooden floors at the MarQueen, but I could be imagining things.  pherank, do you remember?

 

Yes, wooden floors, and I think a rug beneath the bed. But the room I had was very spacious (and I didn't pay extra for that). Every room may be somewhat different from the others. It is an old-fashioned/funky/quaint building. Here are some images of MarQueen rooms -

 

http://i0.bookcdn.co...hotos-Room.JPEG

 

http://www.tripadvis...n.html#19804808

 

http://cdn1.buuteeq....678_default.jpg

 

 

The Mediterranean Inn room style -

 

https://cdn2.gbot.me...617-500x375.jpg

 

The Mediterranean was clean and cozy, or 'very cozy' meaning a tight squeeze between each piece of furniture. There is a computer room in the lobby that makes printing boarding passes and such easy. And the one real standout: the rooftop observation deck that has a great view of the city and Space Needle.



#57 Helene

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 08:21 PM

Now if you want food, you can't spit in Seattle Center without bumping into a Thai restaurant and almost as many coffee shops.  There is reasonably priced food to be had for blocks and blocks, or a fancy meal at Ten Mercer, which is open late and where each PNB ticket envelope has a 20% off entree voucher.  (I think if you did print at home and ask the box office for an envelope, they'll give you one, especially if you tell them you came all the way from [your city]).    (Ten Mercer is between Seattle Center and the MarQueen. Staying there was an experience:  the suite I had was as big as any apartment I've ever lived in, but I found the front desk people a little eager, like they were trying to be a NY hotel from watching movies with NY hotels, at least the guys I dealt with.  I'm not sure if there's an elevator, though.  I remember going up and down the big staircase, where people go to have their wedding pictures taken.)

 

There are a few restaurants in between, like Toulouse Petit.  The food was great when I was there for dinner.  Back in the day they took online reservations for weekend brunch, and I remember trying a bunch of times only to get the "Your funeral will come sooner" message.  They now say that they only take walk-ins, which explains the mass of people outside every weekend morning for hours blocking the sidewalk in little clusters.  So be aware, although they open at 8am for breakfast, if you like breakfast food.  Their happy hour is also a great deal, and they are open until 1am.  They have plenty of happy hour competition in the area, and there's a pub, McMenamin's, that's a block away from McCaw Hall and open late at night, too.  There's also TS McHugh's across from Ten Mercer, within a 1.5 blocks of the Mediterranean Inn and MarQueen. 

 

One that's out of the way, and thanks to sandik I learned about, called Citizen, which is close the Sheraton Four Points, 10 minutes from McCaw Hall, which serves wonderful sweet and savory crepes.

 

Did I mention there's lots of food in the area?



#58 sandik

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 08:42 PM

If you're looking for a diner-style breakfast (or similar vibe for the rest of the day) -- the Mecca Cafe.



#59 Jack Reed

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 12:57 PM

For breakfast, I really like the occupational therapy I get from fixing my own, even before I'm dressed etc.   So I'm paying particular attention to the places to stay described here with at least light cooking and small fridges in the room/suite.  (Plus a snack to sustain me when I find myself running for a curtain.)

 

On the other hand, back in the day, Sid's diner, at 58th and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, was a stimulating place to start the day, especially compared to the Park Lane dining room, where breakfast was so sedate, I tended to fall back asleep until the check came with a jolt.

 

But another consideration has come up besides where to sleep and where to eat, and I'm going to start another thread for that:  Where to sit when attending PNB performances.  (Not as much to be said?  I'd bet, but we'll see.)



#60 sandik

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 03:01 PM

But another consideration has come up besides where to sleep and where to eat, and I'm going to start another thread for that:  Where to sit when attending PNB performances.  (Not as much to be said?  I'd bet, but we'll see.)

 

Helen is the person to speak to that -- she's sat all over the house.  I just sit where they put me.




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