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Wheeldon's Cinderella


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#16 Helene

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 10:26 AM

Except for the blaming Cinderela for her own fate with her new family members, that scenario sounds fascinating.

#17 sandik

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 12:08 PM

Here's the synopsis, taken from the DNB program:


Wow, this is complex -- thank you so much for posting it.

Act One
3 The Grave
Cinderella, older, brings flowers to her mother’s grave....Fuelled by pride alone, Cinderella assumes a subservient attitude towards the women, thus sealing her own fate.


This has greater detail than many versions of the ballet, and the possibility of the stepmother not being a total harridan, although it looks like Wheeldon didn't move her in that direction.

4 Royal Palace Gallery
King Albert attempts to explain to his grown son the political connections to be gained by marrying a titled princess.


This reminds me of the 'no mothers-in-law' aphorism -- I have a feeling it would be a difficult mime sequence to craft!

Guillaume and Benjamin hatch a plan to trade places, pretending to be one another.


Now this has possibilities!

A poor beggar arrives at the door seeking food and warmth. Taking pity, Cinderella brings him into the kitchen, but Hortensia, horrified, casts him out again. ‘The Prince’ (Benjamin) appears at the door. He has discovered a poor beggar outside and insists that Hortensia offer him food and a bit of warmth. Hortensia feigns concern and orders Cinderella to help the beggar. ‘The Prince’ has come to deliver invitations to a ball where he shall choose his bride. Left alone with Cinderella, the beggar (Prince Guillaume in disguise) sees true kindness in this girl.


And here's the possibility realized. In the Stowell production for Pacific Northwest Ballet, the Godmother is the beggar in disguise. I hadn't really thought about the biblical reference, though, until I saw it performed again this autumn.

cryptically warning her to keep an eye on the time.



As if ballet mime wasn't mysterious enough.

And a royal wedding is held.


There's act the last!

#18 Helene

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 01:49 PM


Guillaume and Benjamin hatch a plan to trade places, pretending to be one another.


Now this has possibilities!

This is how Rossini's "La Cenerontala" is set up.

#19 sandik

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 03:37 PM



Guillaume and Benjamin hatch a plan to trade places, pretending to be one another.


Now this has possibilities!

This is how Rossini's "La Cenerontala" is set up.


Can you think of another ballet version that follows that twist?

#20 Helene

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 03:40 PM

Can you think of another ballet version that follows that twist?

I've only seen a handful of "Cinderella"s and none of them used this convention.

#21 Herman Stevens

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 01:47 AM

It's the most successful story ballet I have seen this century.

Here's my take:

http://www.hermanste...blog.asp?Id=173

#22 EricHG31

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 02:10 AM

Terrific review!

Sandik said: "In the Stowell production for Pacific Northwest Ballet, the Godmother is the beggar in disguise. I hadn't really thought about the biblical reference, though, until I saw it performed again this autumn."

I'm sure you already knew this--but this is how both of the original Soviet versions, the 1945 Zakharov production for the Bolshoi and the 1946 K. Sergeyev production for the Kirov staged it.

Helene, not having seen Rossini's opera, does this version seem to use any other elements of its story besides the "switched identities" of the two men? Is the Fairy Godmother in the opera?

#23 Helene

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 02:28 AM

There's no Fairy Godmother per se in the opera, but there's a Godfather of sorts. The beggar in disguise is the Prince's tutor, who, along with the Prince's valet, who pretends to be the Prince, is also on a secret mission for the Prince. After the Stepfather -- there's no Stepmother -- leaves Cenerontola behind to head to the ball with his two daughters, the beggar throws off his beggar's outfit and tells Cenerontola that he'll accompany her to the ball, and, presumably, he's responsible for arranging for her to be decked out in her ball clothes.

The tutor is also responsible for encouraging the Prince to search for Cenerontola.

#24 PeggyR

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 06:41 AM

[font=Helvetica][size=5][size=4]Thank you for the excellent review. [/size][/size][/font]

[font=Helvetica][size=5][size=4]Great news that a DVD will be coming out. I hope we don't end up with a mishmash of fancy camera work and not much sense of the production and dancing.[/size][/size][/font]

#25 Herman Stevens

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:47 AM

I'm not sure about territorial broadcasting technicalities, but perhaps you can watch the tv-registration here:

http://ntrpodium.ntr...anst-cinderella

#26 kbarber

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:16 AM

I'm not sure about territorial broadcasting technicalities, but perhaps you can watch the tv-registration here:

http://ntrpodium.ntr...anst-cinderella


it's viewable in Canada, anyway. I just tried it.

#27 Jane Simpson

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:34 AM

There are some very interesting things on this channel - scan down the listings and you will find documentaries about

Balanchine:

http://www.uitzendin...eringen/1267057

Nureyev:

http://www.uitzendin...eringen/1112600

and more.

New to me though may be old news to others!

#28 PeggyR

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:13 AM

I'm not sure about territorial broadcasting technicalities, but perhaps you can watch the tv-registration here:

http://ntrpodium.ntr...anst-cinderella

Sorry, but I had a distinct Monty Python moment when I got the pop up "Ja, ik accepteer de cookies."

Moving on, for anyone who can't access this link, post #10 in this thread has a link to the same trailer.

#29 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:18 PM

It's the most successful story ballet I have seen this century.

Here's my take:

http://www.hermanste...blog.asp?Id=173


Encouraging BT'rs to read this review. You convinced me, Mr. Stevens! Posted Image (And this is from whom Zakharov/Struchkova's version is the ultimate)


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