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Limon Centennial


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#16 kittykassie

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Posted 15 May 2008 - 01:01 PM

I dance with one of the companies that is listed for 'There is a Time.' We are performing it three more times this month (as part of mixed bill programs). May I list them here?

I would PM you but I don't have that capability-- I'm a new member.

Happy to see this thread-- this is my first time dancing any Limon works, and I love it!

#17 carbro

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 01:15 PM

I dance with one of the companies that is listed for 'There is a Time.' We are performing it three more times this month (as part of mixed bill programs). May I list them here?

Please do!

Welcome to BalletTalk, kittykassie!

#18 kittykassie

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 02:33 PM

Thanks!


LIBERA, Ad Deum Dance Company
Houston, Barnevelder Movement/Arts Complex
May 17th (8pm) and 18th (3pm)
Mixed bill with There is a Time (1956) performed by guest artists of the Sandra Organ Dance Company

Best in Ten, Sandra Organ Dance Company
Houston, Miller Outdoor Theater (FREE admission)
Saturday, May 31st (8pm)

#19 sandik

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Posted 18 May 2008 - 11:49 AM

Well, I guess so... I have trouble getting around the choreographer's name as the company name, I guess.. but I suppose that's just my problem.... I didn't have any trouble with The Joffrey doing other work than Robert Joffrey's, after all... Somehow, though I was thinking more along the lines of Ririe-Woodbury, whom I've heard of but never seen, or when Baryshnikov did those Judson reconstructions.... I'll have to re-think Ailey & Limon, I guess. I remember seeing the Graham company do Stroman and really disliking it; it seemed like ill chosen repertory for Graham dancers... although I was sitting next to a former Graham dancer who quite liked it and presumably knew more about what suits Graham dancers!


Well, both the Ailey and the Limon companies have always performed work by other choreographers. Indeed, when Limon first split off, Doris Humphrey was listed as the artistic director, and they premiered several of her important works (though, to be fair, she wasn't in a position to maintain her own group at the time). In both cases, though, there were significant ties between the artists with the name over the door, and the other choreographers whose work was presented.

The best example I have currently is Repertory Dance Theater -- indeed, they were first founded (with Ford money) for the purpose of being a poly-choreographer rep company. I haven't seen them in several years, but when I did, they were doing an excellent job with multiple styles. Theirs was the first Limon I saw, the first Sokolow, and some of the first Humphrey. They also did a great 'history of modern dance' program with Duncan, Shawn and St Denis excerpts.

I know that the Graham company was hesitant to license the work to anyone else for many years, but that has shifted recently, with several reconstructions in colleges. And I agree that we need more than academic performances for this repertory, but I'm not sure who that will be.

#20 kittykassie

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Posted 19 May 2008 - 05:04 AM

The best example I have currently is Repertory Dance Theater.


I have never seen them (only been to Utah once), but I keep hearing wonderful things abut them from people all over the country. I'd love to see them perform one of these days (the closest I've come is wearing their costumes-- we rented 'There is a Time' costumes from them. :P ).

#21 miliosr

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 05:38 PM

So, I received my latest Limon Company E-news bulletin describing where the company will be performing their reconstruction of Anna Sokolow's Rooms this Summer/Fall:

SUNY Brockport, July 24/25 - informal preview performances

Luckman Fine Arts Center, LA, October 18 - official premiere

Joyce Theater season, December 2-7 - NY premiere


I think this is an admirable reconstruction and is something I would very much like to see. But here's what perplexes me. Why, during Limon's centennial, is the centerpiece going to be a work by Sokolow? Why not wait until 2009??

I'll try to hold comment until I see what the Fall touring/Joyce rep will be. I'll be baffled, though, if we don't get to see rarely performed Limon dances (like Carlota) or anything by Doris Humphrey but do get to see Rooms.

And the Joyce season looks short.

#22 miliosr

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Posted 24 June 2008 - 09:02 AM

I'm updating this thread to reflect performances of Limon's work during the second half of the year:

July

Jacob's Pillow - 07/02

5:00pm - Tudor and Limon at 100 (panel discussion)

6:30pm - New York Theatre Ballet (Mazurkas w/ Tudor's Jardin aux Lilas and Little Improvisations)


Fall

Luna Negra Dance Theater will be touring "There Is a Time"

#23 miliosr

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 04:21 PM

If you're going to be in New Zealand in September, the Christchurch Body Festival of Dance and Physical Theatre will be devoting a day to Limon, under the direction of former Limon company member Louis Solino. Titled Jose Limon: A Celebration, the event will include performances of Air For the G String (Humphrey), The Moor's Pavane (excerpted) and Chaconne.

#24 miliosr

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 05:21 PM

sjDANCEco will be performing Limon's Waldstein Sonata October 16-18.

#25 miliosr

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 04:49 PM

Probably the last update of Limon-related goings-on for the year . . .

The University of Kansas dance company will perform La Malinche on November 20-21.

Doug Elkins is preparing, "a retelling of Shakespeare's Othello using Motown music." Structured after Limon's masterpiece The Moor's Pavane, the working title is Moortown. (Didn't the Trocks perform a Moor's Pavane travesty once upon a time?)

The mothership company will be conducting a "tour" of Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx beginning November 4th and ending the first week in December at the Joyce. The repertory will include three works by Limon (Suite from a Choreographic Offering, The Traitor and The Moor's Pavane), a revival of Anna Sokolow's Rooms and a new work by former company member Clay Taliaferro. (There will also be a gala night featuring excerpts from Limon works plus a performance of Mary Anthony's Lady Macbeth.)

I am curious as to how the Joyce engagement is selling. I took a look at the Queens engagement and that appears to be selling poorly (noticeably worse than Paul Taylor's engagement at the same theater, which is not close to selling out either.)

Lastly, Kurt Douglas has left Limon after seven years to join Lar Lubovitch's company. I found this out when I went to see the Lubovitch company here in Madison and there he was on-stage. (Hated all three Lubovitch pieces by the way.)

See you all in the New Year after I see the Limon Company perform in Minneapolis in March!

#26 bart

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 06:39 PM

I notice that the Limon Dance Company is performing an all-Limon program at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., in January.
http://www.kennedy-c...amp;event=DJDSI

The Traitor -- a response to McCarthyism, set to a score by Gunther Schuller -- sounds particularly interesting.

We have a number of Ballet Talk posters in Washington, so I hope we'll get some reviews.

#27 sandik

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 08:29 PM

Slightly off-topic -- miliosr, I'm sorry to hear that you were disapponted in the Lubovitch show. I've had such mixed responses to his work. Some things, like North Star or Concerto Six Twenty-Two, really seem like seminal works -- they illustrate a particular time and a particular approach to dance, while others just leave me cold. We see them here in February -- could you tell us please what you saw them dance?

#28 miliosr

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 04:02 PM

bart I considered travelling to DC for Limon Dance Company's performance at the Kennedy Center in January on the theory that:

favorite company + favorite city = good time

BUT, I decided against it once I saw what the repertory would be -- Suite from a Choreographic Offering, The Traitor and Psalm. While I love the Suite from a Choreographic Offering, The Traitor is a dark and despairing work which I admire more than I actually like. I have not had the opportunity to see Psalm but I've heard mixed things about it -- too "heavy" and too long (even though the company cut the original running time of an hour (!) in half.) So, the thought of watching two works with angst-ridden protagonists (The Traitor, Psalm) on one bill tipped my decision to the negative. Now, if Carla Maxwell had programmed Limon's Dances for Isadora instead of Psalm, then I would have gone. (Of course, then you would have a bill where two of the dances involve some kind of death by strangulation. If they replaced Suite from A Choreographic Offering with The Moor's Pavane, they would actually have three dances involving strangulation on one bill!)

sandik -- As someone who loves Lubovitch's Concerto Six Twenty-Two, I was SO looking forward to this company's performance and they disappointed me terribly. This was the bill (no Concerto):

Dvorak Serenade (2007)
Jangle (2008)
Men's Stories (2000)

The problem as I saw it was this -- these works (all from this decade) were so similar in tone (which was frenetic) that it felt like they were one long work with costume and music changes. Concerto Six Twenty-Two proved that Lubovitch could juxtapose fast and slow, joyous and bittersweet. But here, everything -- even the slowed down sections -- came across as frenzied and in-your-face. (Men's Stories (in particular) was an absolute trial at 45 minutes+ in length. I would have to put it in the running with Susanne Linke's Extreme Beauty and Alwin Nikolais' Tent as the most pretentious twaddle I've ever had the displeasure to see on a stage.)

#29 sandik

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 08:56 PM

If they replaced Suite from A Choreographic Offering with The Moor's Pavane, they would actually have three dances involving strangulation on one bill!


Oh my.

Still, you never know. Directors use all kinds of themes for program planning now.

#30 miliosr

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 09:29 AM

An evening consisting of accidental strangulation (Isadora Duncan), suicidal strangulation (Judas Iscariot) and homicidal strangulation (Desdemona) would probably be a bit much but the sheer morbidity of such a "theme" night would be a brutal riposte to all those pretentious theme nights dance companies indulge in (the New York City Ballet being a prime offender.)


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