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First soviet dancers to hit the StatesTatiana Vecheslova & Vakhtang Chabukiani 1934


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#16 rg

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 08:10 PM

yes, you may post this scan if you'd like, but kindly note that it comes from the collection of Robert Greskovic

#17 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 11:01 PM

I think anyone born in the USA is considered American no matter where there family originally came from.

Much depends on the national or ethnic origin and the length of time the family and/or group has been in the United States. Yes, our primary identification is to the US, but the secondary identification is rarely absent altogether. Assimilation is a multi-generational process.


True...if you ask many young people that one find here in Miami speaking perfect "Cuban"-(yes...not Spanish, but "Cuban")- with none English accent whatsoever "Are you Cuban..?"...the answer being..."Yes, I am"...and so.."from where in Cuba..?" to finally get the "No, I'm Cuban but I was born here in Miami. My parents are from there". This is a very common thing to hear. There is a cute t-shirt that sells really well within the Cuban/American youngsters community that reads: "Made in USA with Cuban parts" :wub:

#18 rg

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:10 AM

the attached shows a publicity photo for the appearances of Vecheslova and Chabukiani - i'm not sure where this "Philharmonic Auditorium" is but it may be the West Coast of the US, perhaps the Los Angeles area.

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#19 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 10:36 AM

I know that "Philharmonic Auditorium" is a little generic-sounding, but Wikipedia did have this which sounded promising:

Philharmonic Auditorium

When the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra began its second season in 1920, it adopted Clune's Auditorium as its home, which became known as, "Philharmonic Auditorium." The Orchestra played there for many decades before the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion was built in 1963. Philharmonic Auditorium stood until the 1980s, when it was demolished.

#20 leonid17

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 04:11 AM

rg
Thank you so much for such and treasure pictures and notes.
As you know this year is 100 anniversary of great maestro Vaghtang Chabukiani.
Here is some : temporary page , that is yet unpublished on main page. You can find some rare videos in external links. By your desert , there was added text from your pictures.
I want to ask you, can we use this pictures on Main Wiki page of Vaghtang Chabukiani?


Thank you for reminding us of Chabukiani's centenary on 27 February(12 March) 1910. This will be celebrated in Tbilisi and has been marked by UNESCO.

See: http://www.opera.ge/...t_press_release SCROLL DOWN FOR DETAILS.

The first performance of a revival of Chabukiani's ballet "Laurencia", unseen for many years, is to be given at the Coliseum Theatre London by the Mikhailovsky Ballet on the 20th July.

#21 rg

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Posted 23 April 2010 - 07:44 PM

another recently acquired publicity photo from the historic Vecheslova/Chabukiani tour to the US.
the only bit of identifying information on the photo, which has only the dancers' names handwritten on the back, is an embossed mark noting the photo was was done in NYC.

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#22 rg

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Posted 24 April 2010 - 07:32 AM

the following entry from NYPL dance coll. might help identify the number for which TV and VC are costumed.
as noted below, the '34 tour repertory for the soviet dancer couple included what seems to have been a 'pirate's(?) cachucha' to music by Dunayevsky.
certainly something Spanish seems indicated.
the confusion to dance history overall in the entry below is that the likely, automatic connection to CORSAIRE would be to the Adam, etc. multi-act ballet in which the now well-known 'pirate/slave' Pas de Deux (sometimes a trois) was a concert number made famous by VC.
this obviously is not THAT Corsaire.

Corsair : Original title: Korsar kachucha. Chor: Vakhtang Chabukiani; mus: Isaak Dunayevsky. First perf: Leningrad, Kirov Ballet School, ca1928, Vakhtang Chabukiani and Elena Chikvaidze.//First New York perf: Carnegie Hall, Jan 12, 1934, Tatiana Vecheslova and Vakhtang Chabukiani. Performed under title: Kacuca.

#23 rg

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 07:06 PM

another publicity photo, seemingly taken, impromptu, in NYC, and perhaps at the Barbizon Hotel rather than the "Barizon" named in the caption.
interestingly the theater connected to these two Leningrad dancers is the still called the Maryinsky in'34 in connection to these individuals, tho' perhaps it was the tour promoter's usage and not that of the dancers themselves.
again, i know no more of these circumstances than the caption says.

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#24 Lidewij

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:06 AM

I came across this on Youtube today; apparently video footage of Vecheslova and Chabukiani in the States. :)

#25 rg

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 06:44 AM

many thanks for the link.
except for the paper items (programs and fliers, etc.) and some still photos of Vecheslova and Chabukiani, the dating of the various items and film footage is hard to identify. i suspect the theater audiences might have been from sometime later, ditto that of the cars, streets, and awaiting photographers.
the performance footage could not be from this first tour, since the duo didn't bring supporting dancers and/or stage-fire effects as far as i can tell.
Russian speakers could say more about the occasion of the footage, but perhaps the clip of Vecheslova talking about her career was meant, originally, for a Chabukiani documentary.
whatever the clips and photos were meant to illustrate originally they are good to have in this youtube montage.
(i wonder if some of the fliers and programs included might have been downloaded from Ballet Talk as they are sometimes cropped above what might have been my watermarked credit line.)

#26 rg

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 12:38 PM

scan of a further record of Vecheslova's and Chabukiani's US tour in '34.

 

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#27 California

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 01:27 PM

Interesting tidbit in that caption: they were the first Soviet dancers "allowed permission by their government to visit America." That makes me wonder which other dancers left the Soviet Union without permission between 1922 and 1934  - the earliest defectors? 



#28 sandik

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 09:09 PM

This latest image looks like the same costumes from the pictures in #18 and #21.



#29 rg

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 04:57 AM

indeed these "CORSAIRE" costumes seem to have been worn for most of the publicity photos, presumably the music for the dance indicated here as Kacuca refers to one of the marketplace, pirate numbers: the Danse des corsairs? or the Danse des Forbans? 

regarding the caption's wording, something tells me that perhaps one or two solo dancers did appear in the US from the USSR prior to this on some mixed program, but not nec. as 'official' representatives of Soviet ballet, but i can't recall just whom i might be recalling.

almost certainly the caption doesn't mean to imply that previously there had been 'defectors' from the USSR.



#30 Swanilda8

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 07:04 AM

Thank you for these photos! I haven't seen such high quality publicity pictures for this tour before.

 

Interesting tidbit in that caption: they were the first Soviet dancers "allowed permission by their government to visit America." That makes me wonder which other dancers left the Soviet Union without permission between 1922 and 1934  - the earliest defectors? 

 

 

regarding the caption's wording, something tells me that perhaps one or two solo dancers did appear in the US from the USSR prior to this on some mixed program, but not nec. as 'official' representatives of Soviet ballet, but i can't recall just whom i might be recalling.

almost certainly the caption doesn't mean to imply that previously there had been 'defectors' from the USSR.

 

I would agree with rg that it's unlikely there had been 'defectors' prior to this. Although many dancers (like Balanchine) left the Soviet Union in the 1920s, often without informing the government what they were doing, it wasn't seen as such a political statement. It was more a result of the economic circumstances of living and dancing in Russia in the 1920s - if you could get out, you did. The Soviet Union tried to get a lot of those who left in the 1920s to come back in the mid 1930s (Prokofiev is the poster child for this policy). Of course, many of those who left either already hated communism or would come to hate it.

 

I'm not sure, but I would guess the caption is trying to differentiate between this tour, officially sponsored by the Soviet government, and other Russian dancers touring the US like the Ballets Russes performers.




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