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Nicolai Hübbe on RDB in November


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9 replies to this topic

#1 jorgen

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Posted 20 September 2002 - 10:55 AM

Nicolai Hübbe will guest the RDB on November 16, 20 and 22. He will dance in Flemming Flindt's "Enetime" (The Lesson).

Three Danish masterpieces are presented:
The Conservatory by August Bournonville
The Lesson by Flemming Flindt
Etudes by Harald Lander

RDB: http://www.kgl-teater.dk/

/jorgen
www.ballerinagallery.com

#2 Alexandra

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Posted 17 November 2002 - 06:17 PM

There's a 2 minute 41 second interview with Hubbe, in Danish -- and three brief dancing segments from "The Lesson" -- on the Royal Danish Ballet's home page.

If you go to http://www.kgl-teater.dk/ on the home page you'll see a photo of Bournonville's Konservatoriet, and below that there's a little icon of a movie camera and "Se interview med Nikolaj Hübbe" Click, find the same words again, choose your connection speed and you'll get it.

They also promise a "trailer" but I couldn't get that to work.

#3 Lolly

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Posted 17 November 2002 - 11:58 PM

I could see the trailer - it is almost the same but the dancers are in costume. It's quite scary!:eek:

#4 KayDenmark

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Posted 18 November 2002 - 03:40 AM

They had a full house for the show on the 16th...it turned out to be an excellent marriage of a dancer and a role. A lot more acting than dancing, but Hübbe has always had a bent towards acting anyway.

#5 jorgen

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Posted 18 November 2002 - 11:55 AM

Review from the first night, without Hübbe on Nov 15, in Berlingske Tidende:

http://www.berlingsk...kel:aid=231784/

In Danish only.

#6 Mary J

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 11:47 AM

Am I imagining it, or is Hubbe wearing the old Danish men's ballet shoes?

Also I liked seeing the trailer but the performance didn't seem as violent as I remember. (It has been a long time, though.)

#7 Mary J

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 11:49 AM

Okay - LOL - make my question "the old-fashioned style of men's ballet shoes..."

#8 Alexandra

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 12:07 PM

Yes, Mary J -- I noticed that, too. The 19th century shoes. Apparently that's what men wore in the 19th century, but, like many things, the tradition survived only in Denmark. It makes the foot look so beautiful, I think.

I only saw this with Nureyev, who was crazed from his entry. I was always surprised at how much dancing there was in it. (Meaning, I remember it as a theater piece, and am surprised every time I see it at how much it uses dance.)

#9 Mary J

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Posted 25 November 2002 - 09:09 AM

I finally listened to the trailer. It is funny to hear Hubbe speaking Danish, and then the words "serial killer" come out of his mouth!

Am I right in thinking the woman dancing the student is different in the rehearsal as against the performance version? I think the performance version seems less violent than I remember because the victim doesn't seem all that frightened.

#10 Alexandra

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Posted 25 November 2002 - 10:32 AM

I never got the trailer, so I can't say. (I kept getting an error message.)

I have several Danish videos where English comes out suddenly. One of the strangest, to me, is an introduction to Bournonville's "Kermesse in Bruges," where in the very last sentence, the narrator says "happy ending." I thought that odd, since Bournonville is often denigrated for having only happy endings (his darker works were dumped in the 1930s) that there isn't a Danish equivalent.


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