Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Death of the RoseMaya Plisetskaya


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 pherank

pherank

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,276 posts

Posted 13 April 2013 - 12:39 PM

I've always loved a video of Maya Plisetskaya in Death of the Rose (an old black and white version that I don't think is currently available online). And last night, I ran into this 1978 Roland Petit version of Death of the Rose (La Rose Malade) on TV (with Maya) - and I thought it was pretty wonderful. An entire workshop on the use of arms. I just don't get to see this type of dancing these days.


[Maya Plisetskaya & Valery Kovtun - note that the obnoxious titling does disappear after a few seconds]

#2 Anne

Anne

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 231 posts

Posted 14 April 2013 - 03:48 AM

Thank you for posting this! It was great to see both this and some of the other clips you had collected with this very special ballerina. You are right about the beauty of her arms. She seems to be able to express everything with them.

#3 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:23 PM

Everything you say is true, phrank. I love your phrase, "an entire workshop on the use of the arms."

This is not the sort of number, danced to this sort of music, I ordinarily appreciate. Maybe I am too cynical or addicted to irony.. But Plisetskaya invests the choreography with such sincerity and artistry, that it becomes genuinely moving. At the end, I was startled by way the long, slowly developed "maladie" of the rose turns suddenly to anguish and death.

I also love the way the white background -- and uncomplicated camera work -- allow you the to see every aspect of the movement and body-shaping so clearly.

#4 pherank

pherank

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,276 posts

Posted 16 April 2013 - 10:17 PM

Everything you say is true, phrank. I love your phrase, "an entire workshop on the use of the arms."

This is not the sort of number, danced to this sort of music, I ordinarily appreciate. Maybe I am too cynical or addicted to irony.. But Plisetskaya invests the choreography with such sincerity and artistry, that it becomes genuinely moving. At the end, I was startled by way the long, slowly developed "maladie" of the rose turns suddenly to anguish and death.

I also love the way the white background -- and uncomplicated camera work -- allow you the to see every aspect of the movement and body-shaping so clearly.


I know what you are saying, Bart, there's a kind of innocence to this production/approach that is easy to regard cynically, academically, but the extraordinary artistry of Plisetskaya, her spiritual quality, renders my cynical reflex mute. I feel foolish saying anything negative about this. I'm reminded of modern music critics who talk about the great technical skill, and flying fingers, of various modern 'guitar gods', but nobody laughs listening to a scratchy, technically primitive performance of Robert Johnson playing and singing "Hellhound on my Trail". It transcends technique and 'showmanship' to be a work of art. And that is what ultimately impresses me - more than any practiced 'professional' performance.

I agree about the simplified camerwork - there's rarely a need to have a lot of camera trickery when showing dance. I'd rather be given the same view as front row, dress circle and let me see things for myself.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):