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Nutcracker Grand Pas De DeuxWhat version(s) is your favorite?


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25 replies to this topic

#16 MakarovaFan

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 02:57 PM

I love Baryshnikov's Nutcracker PDD. I overlook the unnecessary inclusion of Drosselmeyer and focus on the magnificent music, the lovely choreography and the magic Misha-Gelsey chemistry.

Also, I hate to admit it, but I also like Grigorovich's. It's pedestrian, as so much of his work is, but Vasiliev's and Maximova's gifts raise it to a beautiful level.

#17 Cygnet

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 11:41 AM

. . . Also, I hate to admit it, but I also like Grigorovich's. It's pedestrian, as so much of his work is, but Vasiliev's and Maximova's gifts raise it to a beautiful level.

I agree. Grigorovich's "Nutcracker' pdd was just one of their show-stoppers. Grigorovich's version was child's play for them. In Misha's version, Drosselmeyer intruded, and in Grigorovich's version the corps intruded. But this didn't matter. Only Katya and Volodya could clock in +10 min. ovations after the adage, and in between the variations and the coda. There was such kinetic energy in Maximova's languid, then lightening fast series of piourettes, you could feel it. She gathered such momentum at the end of the adage . . . they were awesome. They were the music. I can only imagine how they would have interpreted the Ivanov pdd had they had the opportunity.

Hans wrote:

Quite a surreal performance...as if Odile decided to drop by Confiturembourg!

Bejart's version: (:unsure: ?) IMO it's not the version that you can take your children and grandparents to see. The pdd is beautifully danced but it seems so out of "context" with the rest of his conceptualization. I think that a black tutu is visually at odds with the delicate chimes of a celeste, but I think that was his aim. The ballerina isn't supposed to be the SPF.

#18 Mireille

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Posted 16 December 2009 - 08:15 PM

I recently saw on youtube with Noella Pontois and Denis Ganio and I was wondering which version it was... anyone know?

#19 Hans

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Posted 16 December 2009 - 08:37 PM

According to the video information, it is by Roland Petit.

#20 volcanohunter

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Posted 26 December 2009 - 02:51 PM

Here's a shocker: My favorite is Balanchine's, even tho it doesn't have a male variation (which I regret).

I have to agree. When you compare Balanchine's version with the traditional text as it's performed by English companies, you realize that he wasn't choreographing in a vacuum. Balanchine's pas de deux is like a commentary on the original. A year ago Alastair Macaulay wrote: "Actually, though Balanchine did take considerable liberties with music and scenario, his proves closer to the original 1892 conception than almost any other."
http://www.nytimes.c...nce/01nutc.html

Here's the other thing I love. Apparently Hanya Holm would say that once a movement was initiated, it would continue in space along its trajectory to infinity. This idea is most clearly visualized in Alwin Nikolais' Tensile Involvement, but I also can't help think of it when watching the intersecting limbs in Balanchine's Nutcracker adagio.

#21 Jack Reed

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 12:04 PM

I also agree with carbro, for her reason, in a general way: The Fedorova adagio begins well enough, but Tchaikovsky builds a crescendo we don't see. Where the ballerina makes a little hop on toe and raises an arm, facing her partner, the choreography and the music diverge, it seems to me. We may see something very authentic in these several clips (thanks again to Cristian for posting them), but don't we read somewhere that Petipa found himself with a dancer of limited ability to work with in the first place? Regardless of that, for my approach to theatrical-dance watching, at least, what I see ought to seem to derive in some intuitable way from what I hear, or at least relate to it more closely, and Balanchine's musical perception does it again here.

#22 Nanarina

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 03:47 PM

Nureyev's version. Breathtaking! When he tossed Merle Park into the air - twice - I was in shock. His entire choreography was the best and most exciting that I've ever seen.






Yes toeprints I too love Nureyevs version. That throw up into the air and the way he catches Merle Park was so spectacular, and cleanly executed. The final position when he supports her on his extended leg is quite something, he is rock solid and does not wobble or put his leg down quickly like some other Male partners do. Imagine the strain to hold the leg with the whole weight of the Ballerina along it and staying grounded. It is wonderful how it looks effortless.

#23 PeggyR

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 05:30 PM

Nureyev's version. Breathtaking! When he tossed Merle Park into the air - twice - I was in shock. His entire choreography was the best and most exciting that I've ever seen.

The whole pas de deux looks fiendishly difficult, but the first 50 seconds or so -- simple, perfectly placed arabesques -- are stunning. If a solo dancer wobbles it's not nearly as noticeable as it would be with dancers in tandem like that. And the complementary lines of the two - exquisite.

#24 Helene

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Posted 01 January 2010 - 05:56 PM

My favorite is the Balanchine, too.

It was great to be able to contrast Lorna Feijoo and Jordan Elizabeth Long in the same (Fedorova) choreography. Long's sunny quality reminds me of a young Darci Kistler.

#25 Dr. Coppelius

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 10:43 AM

Mine is Peter Martins "Barbie", mostly because my daughter forced me to dance it with her so many times.

Martins Barbie and Balanchine's Nutcracker Grand Pas De Deux are the ones that still bring tears in my eyes

Maria Kowroski did Barbies dancing
Barbie Grand Pas De Deux

#26 Nanarina

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 12:25 PM

Mine is Peter Martins "Barbie", mostly because my daughter forced me to dance it with her so many times.

Martins Barbie and Balanchine's Nutcracker Grand Pas De Deux are the ones that still bring tears in my eyes

Maria Kowroski did Barbies dancing
Barbie Grand Pas De Deux





Letting children watch these Barbie DVD's is an introduction to Culture, not just a range of toys.
All my Grand Daughters love their Barbie Ballet and the experience has made them ask to go to a live performance, which they really enjoyed.


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