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Director's Choice: Casting and ReviewsDances at a Gathering, After the Rain PDD, Symphony in C


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#16 Helene

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:27 PM

Congratulations to your daughter, leslie4310!

#17 sandik

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:50 PM

Congratulations to your daughter, leslie4310!


Congratulations indeed!

#18 Paul Parish

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:13 PM

Cngratulations from me, too leslie4310.

BTW, what does PD stand for? It's obviously not "principal dancer"

#19 Helene

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:27 PM

PD=Professional Division.

#20 Helene

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 01:49 PM

I think sandik makes the best case for the ballet in her review in Seattle Weekly (from Links):

Dances is close to being a perfect ballet, a just-right combination of music, movement, concept, and execution. It heralded the beginnings of the '70s dance boom and marked the return of Jerome Robbins to ballet from the Broadway stage. And it astonished critics with its seamless combination of ballet technique and pedestrian movement—it was the most modest, natural-looking thing anyone had seen on a ballet stage up till then. And it remains so today.


http://www.seattlewe...-treats-at-pnb/

#21 Fan who rides the bus

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 06:38 PM

Thanks, Helene and Sandy, for your generous and thoughtful responses. I have my tickets.

#22 Helene

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 12:19 AM

I saw tonight's performance, and in summary, the company is not resting on its laurels: instead, it's offering new casting (not just injury-related) in principal roles, and it's building on the first week's performances.

New to "Dances at a Gathering" was Ariana Lallone as Girl in Green. I would rather have seen her in Pink or Mauve: she is missing the shameless gene without which Girl in Green is too credible and not enough of a pest, to use sandik's great description. Also dancing in the ballet for the first time this season was Kiyon Gaines as Boy in Brick. I don't think I noticed before how perfectly pointed his feet are: in the jumping-in-place section in the pas de deux with Girl in Apricot, a delightful Carrie Imler (also debuting in the role), it was as if there were sparks coming out of his toes, the line was so extended.

There were three performances that really stood out for me tonight.

Sometime in tutu ballets Rachel Foster fades for me, even tonight in "Symphony in C" Fourth Movement, in which her partner was James Moore, who gave a very powerful and striking performance, although she hit the infamous complex pirouette dead on with complete clarity and control. In more modern roles, she dances about a foot taller than she is, and she and Moore have fantastic chemistry. In "After the Rain" there is a lot of legato, and that's the quality that all three women I'd seen before have stressed, although with different emotional tone, but Foster did something more: she added a tension and an elastic momentum, pushing forward and snapping back that gave it another level of pathos and a bigger sense of the shape of the movement. It was a gorgeous performance -- a revelation -- and she's cast for it again for the Sunday matinee. This is a must-see.

There was just the smallest bit more ease tonight in Miranda Weese's performance of Girl in Pink in "Dances at a Gathering", and that had the effect of magnifying her her movement. There was so much charm, wit, and fellowship in her interpretation -- her short slow waltz with her fellow "sister", Sarah Ricard Orza as Girl in Blue was very touching -- but the best part was the warmth and generosity of her dancing. When she first announced that she was moving to join PNB, zerbinetta paid tribute to her and described her as womanly, and that is a perfect description. This was a great, grown-up performance, one of the highlights of this season.

Maria Chapman also danced Second Movement of "Symphony in C" with more ease than in her first go last week and with the same amplification of effect, for an even lovelier performance. Despite the treacherous balance in the pas de deux, the crucible is in the Fourth Movement, when all of the ballerinas are in a row and dancing in unison: it is that point at which the naked comparison happens. This evening, with Kaori Nakamura on one side and Carrie Imler on the other, Chapman took her rightful place between them.

#23 SandyMcKean

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 10:09 AM

This evening, with Kaori Nakamura on one side and Carrie Imler on the other, Chapman took her rightful place between them.

What a test by fire. If the word "perfect" ought ever to be applied to a dancers technique, two that would immediately jump into my mind would be Kaori Nakamura and Carrie Imler (among PNB dancers). That's quite a compliment you just paid to Maria.

P.S. I couldn't go last night due to an "important" meeting I had to attend. Your review makes me realize how poor my judgment was when I made that choice :thumbsup:.

#24 sandik

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Posted 05 June 2009 - 01:11 PM

This comment on Miranda Weese

When she first announced that she was moving to join PNB, zerbinetta paid tribute to her and described her as womanly, and that is a perfect description. This was a great, grown-up performance, one of the highlights of this season.


hits the nail on the head. The few times I've had to see her, she's read as very mature to me -- as if she's already tried all the other options and found the one that works for her. I'll be sorry to see that leave.

#25 Fan who rides the bus

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 07:19 AM

Well, it took me two viewings to like Dances at a Gathering, so I have to retract all my comments (except the praise).

#26 SandyMcKean

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 05:20 PM

Well, it took me two viewings to like Dances at a Gathering........

Well done!

I can't exactly say why I loved it from the get go, but I can easily imagine that I might not have liked it had I seen it at a different point in my life.

I ended up seeing it 4 times. I loved it every time. What surprised me is that the piece seemed shorter every time I saw it! Each time I found myself saying to myself, "Damn, it's almost over already". I would have guessed it would have seemed longer each time. Maybe that's one sign of a masterpiece (at least when masterfully danced -- as it was by PNB).

#27 Helene

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 09:12 AM

Just a few comments on Friday night's performance.

Both Lallone's (Green) and Imler's (Apricot) performances were bigger than their first for these roles. For Lallone, it meant that the humor in the Waltz Walk was crisper, and for Imler, I wasn't sure this was possible. Sometimes the debut performance has all of the energy, and the second is more subdued, but in this ballet, every cast, even the one that had the advantage of the stage dress rehearsal, looked bigger and stronger in the second (and subsequent) performances.

Just as I was about to jettison the second solo for Boy in Brown (or give it to Boy in Brick), James Moore gave one of the best performances of it that I've seen in almost three decades, especially in the dynamic weight and direction changes, giving them weight and power. (My first Boys in Brown were Helgi Tomasson and Ib Andersen; Moore is in very good company.)

Louise Nadeau was luminous in "After the Rain Pas de Deux". In the Q&A afterwards, Peter Boal said that Nadeau spent the last rep in "business as usual" mode, but that the fact of her retirement was just starting to hit.

Kaori Nakamura danced with crystalline simplicity leading the First Movement of "Symphony in C". Even towards the end of the run there were debuts, with Lindsi Dec and Kiyon Gaines dancing Third Movement. (Dec must have done at least four roles in the ballet; I'm not sure how she kept it all straight.) It was a fine debut for both. Dec looked cautious in the killer repeat opening segment. This may have been due partly to the very hard schedule she had and partly in doing the blocking on the stage for the first time. We had been privileged to see Imler and Nakamura in the same part earlier in the run, and what distinguishes these two from many dancers I've seen in the role are their calm, articulated upper bodies and the precise focus of their head and eyes. In the inevitable comparisons, Dec didn't have these qualities in the opening repeat, but by the final section, she did. I look forward to seeing them again the next time the ballet is presented.

Gaines and Dec were the Q&A guests. Friends offstage, they are a delight together, energetic and funny, goading each other on to tell stories. For example, Dec and Lesley Rausch, and Gaines and David (?) Schneider were called into the office the day they were offered contracts. Each pair was delighted that the other pair was there, but waiting for Francia Russell, they all squished onto a seat built for two, with Russell likening them to sardines. Gaines had requested "Symphony in C" Third Movement, but didn't have a partner; Dec, who had a busy schedule, found herself on the rehearsal schedule again, wondering why.

Gaines also teased Dec until she told the story of her engagement to Karel Cruz. Cruz had arranged a trip for the two of them to Europe, visiting childhood friends he hadn't seen in years and exploring the countries, when after a long walking day, Dec resisted going out to dinner, then dressing up. Of course, this was The Dinner, but even after he brought up marriage, she didn't catch on until he pulled out the ring box. They'll be married this summer: congratulations :( to them both!

I was cleaning out my Inbox when I found an email from PNB that I had missed, with Peter Boal's comments about the Director's Choice program:

Here are a few facts about this rep that you may find interesting:

In Dances at a Gathering, The Brick boy usually learns the Purple boy's part in the grand waltz because the Purple boy's back usually goes out.

Originally, Violette Verdy (the Green girl) only danced one two-minute solo and the finale. Her first entrance comes thirty-five minutes into the ballet. Her part was later expanded to include the "Walk Waltz."

Dances at a Gathering took two years to choreograph. At the end of the two years, most of the cast was requesting to be taken out of the ballet.

In the two boys' dance, Robbins likened the dancers to a great dane and a terrier.

After the Rain pas de deux was Christopher Wheeldon's last creation in honor of the great partnership of New York City Ballet dancers Wendy Whelan and Jock Soto.

This was Chris's first work that didn't have the ballerina in pointe shoes.

Georges Bizet composed his Symphony in C when he was 17 years old. It was lost for many years. When found, Stravinsky recommended the music to Balanchine, who choreographed it for the Paris Opera Ballet when he was guest ballet master there in 1947.

Francia Russell has been staging Symphony in C since 1964, when she first began staging ballets for Balanchine

New York City Ballet performed Symphony in C the day Balanchine died, April 30, 1983. There wasn't a dry eye in the house when Suzanne Farrell and Peter Martins danced the second movement.


Hardly alone, I missed Carla Korbes in this rep. She suffered a rib injury during a lift in the Dress Rehearsal of "Dances at a Gathering", and I watched for lifts in the last performance. I knew before there were a lot of them in "Dances", but I don't know how any of the women survived rehearsals and performances, with the exception of Girl in Green, who isn't lifted. Add in Boal's fact above about Boy in Purple, and I wonder if/how much Robbins thought about the dancers bodies when choreographing.

The day Balanchine died, early in the morning, not all of the audience were aware at the matinee until Lincoln Kirstein's curtain announcement. He specifically said there wouldn't be a program change; I remember Robbins' "Mother Goose", Balanchine's "Kammermusik No. 2", and there was a third, non-Balanchine. (Maybe Robbins' "Four Seasons"?). By the evening performance, the news had reached much of the audience; it was like a wake, a combination of shock, mourning, and gathering. Martins and Farrell weren't the original cast in "Symphony in C" -- Martins had cut down the number of his performances by then -- but it was moving and fitting that they danced in Balanchine's memory that night, and Boal's description was apt.


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