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Petipa's Talisman


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#16 Hans

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Posted 13 July 2003 - 01:12 PM

Maybe she had to adjust her balance at the moment the picture was taken.

#17 carbro

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Posted 13 July 2003 - 01:25 PM

Except that these photos were not taken in an moment. The exposure time necessary in very old photos is -- if I remember -- about a minute. I read that many ballet photos around the late 1800s-early 1900s used supports to hold the ballerina in place en pointe during the plate exposure, and that these devices were removed by airbrushing during the processing. Perhaps -- here's an idea -- if she didn't have such a support, she struck a wider foot position in able to hold her balance by herself? :devil:

#18 Mel Johnson

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Posted 13 July 2003 - 03:08 PM

Yes, the exposure times in early photography were longer, but by the 1890s, the time was down to about .5 to .25 of a second. What that replaced was the wet plate negative and the salted paper print (1852 & 1860) (an example of which can be seen on the "Who We Are" page of the main Ballet Alert site) which had exposure times of up to 8 or 9 seconds. They in turn replaced the daguerreotype (1849) which was absolutely deadly in more ways than one - an exposure time of a minute in full sun, or 8 or 9 minutes in a studio with a very wide skylight. Obviously there was overlap of technologies, but any dancer can tell that a quarter-second is an eternity when it comes to photos! And by the way, the first successful experimental photograph was made in 1832 - a landscape exposed for 30 minutes in full sunlight!

#19 Alexandra

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Posted 14 July 2003 - 01:44 PM

Another photo of The Talisman from rg's collection.

Ludmila Pavlovna Barash (or Barache) in TALISMAN
Born in 1887
Other roles she seems to have had include the lead in the pavel gerdt and
lev ivanov SYLVIA, as well as performed Cleopatra in Fokine's "Egyptian
Nights".

Attached Files



#20 Mikhail

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 04:04 AM

Perhaps, it will be interesting to know that “The Talisman” was created recently in Italy:

The Talisman
Arena Ballet, Padua, March 16, 1997

Music – R.Drigo, choreography – Chalmer-Petipa. Cast: Carla Fracci (Niriti), Ileana Citaristi (Amravati), Alessandro Molin (Vayou), Stephan Fournial (Noureddin), Simona Mangani (Damayanti).

Probably, it was done in the context of Drigo’s 150th anniversary in 1996 (the composer was born in Padua and there was a conference on the occasion). This was not a restoration, of course - rather a stylization to the epoch. There are some discrepancies with the synopsis, but many scenes fit the latter. I know nothing if Chalmer used Sergeev’s notations from Harvard.

#21 R S Edgecombe

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 07:53 AM

Mikhail, what a brilliant phrase you have coined to characterize the sorts of things Lacotte does--"stylization to the epoch." So much better than reconstruction in tweezering inverted commas!

#22 carbro

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 02:15 PM

Just noticed this :FIREdevil: :

....the creation of Marius Petipa (creator of "The Sleeping Beauty", "The Nutcracker" [emphasis added], "Swan Lake", and "La Bayadere" among others) ...

What was your source, nlkflint?

Yes, Mikhail. I agree with RSE that your phrase is especially vivid and precise. :3dnod:

I am struck by the contrast between the photos of the obviously corseted Kchessinska and the obviously uncorseted Barash. Somehow (maybe it's the whalebones?), the difference is far more discrepant than that between, say, Nikiya in Act I and Nikiya in the Kingdom of the Shades.

#23 Hans

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 02:32 PM

It seems to me that saying Petipa was the creator of Swan Lake is just as accurate as saying he was the creator of the Nutcracker. Ivanov helped in both, but Petipa devised the orginal concepts, didn't he?

#24 nlkflint

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 02:57 PM

I am not at home with the source book for the original quote, but in the meantime here is a synopsis from Ballet Minnesota that I have referenced before. I am certain this "version" may not have each and every fact straight.........

1802: Alexander Dumas Pere was born in Villers-Cotteręts 40 km NE of Paris, France. A French writer, he wrote a revised vision of ETA Hoffman's The Nutcracker and the Mouse King titled "L'Histoire d'un Casse Noisette (The Story of a Hazelnut-cracker). It was from these reviesed versions of the story that Marius Petipa (choreographer of the Nutcracker) got his ideas for the story of the Nutcracker Ballet.
       
1816: E. T. A. Hoffman published his book "The Nutcracker and the Mouse King". This work was a morbid story never intended for children which intended to show the depraved and desperate side of mankind.

1818: Marius Petipa, choreographer of the Nutcracker, is born in Marseilles, France. ---- First ballet master to the Tzar of Russia was Marius Petipa. He is credited with ushering in the golden age of Classical Ballet. His ballets included Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, La Bayadere, Don Quoxite and the Nutcracker.

1834: Lev Ivanov is born in Russia.  A Russian dancer, teacher, choreographer, and ballet-master. Ivanov was assistant to chief ballet-master Marius Petipa at the Imperial St. Petersburg Theatres, St Petersburg, Russia. He was instrumental in the development of the classic romantic ballet in Russia. When Petipa fell ill, Ivanov created the choreography for The Nutcracker.
(reference: Electric Library)

1840: Peter I Tchaikovsky, composer of the Nutcracker, is born in Russia.

1890: A. Vsevolozsky, director of Imperial Theaters in Russia, planned to produce a new ballet, "The Nutcracker". This came about because of the success which the ballet "Sleeping Beauty" recieved.  He also planned to use the same choreographer (Marius Petipa) and composer (Peter Tchaikovsky) which collaborated to produce "Sleeping Beauty":


1891: Choreographer Marius Petipa commissioned composer Peter I. Tchaikovsky to compose the musis for the Nutcracker.

Early 1892: Tchaikovsky begins work on the music for the Nutcracker. Upon completion of the score in the summer of 1892 Tchaikovsky wrote that the music he composed was "infinitely poorer than The Sleeping Beauty" (which he had composed and premiered in 1890.

Footnote: An interesting footnote to the score of The Nutcracker is the famous use of the celesta in the Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy. The celesta was a new musical instrument which had just been created by Auguste Mustel. Tchaikovsky had discovered the newly-invented instrument just before departing for the U.S., and was immediately captivated by its ``divinely beautiful tone.'' He arranged to have one sent to Russia secretly, because he was ``afraid Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazunov may get hold of it and use the unusual effect before me.''   (reference: Tchaikovsky: "Nutcracker" Suite)


March 1892: Tchaikovsky premiered the music for The Nutcracker Ballet Suite before was ballet was even produced. This eight-part concert version of the ballet music was a success. At least six times, the audience demanded immediate encores of specific music selections. Because of the Suite's instant success, the score was published even before the ballet premiered.    (reference: The History of the Nutcracker)

           Footnote: The Nutcracker, Op. 71a  was scored for 3 flutes (3rd doubling piccolo, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 trombones, bass trombone, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, glockenspiel, tympani, harp, celesta, and strings. (reference: Tchaikovsky: "Nutcracker" Suite)

 
September, 1892: Rehearsals begin for the Nutcracker. Choreographer Marius Petipa is taken ill and replaced by Lev Ivanov.   Although Petipa worked with Tchaikovsky to create the story, the story, Ivanov is also generally credited with choreographing the Nutcracker.   (reference: The History of the Nutcracker)


World Premiere

December 18, 1892: Nutcracker World Premiere was at the Maryinsky Theater in St Petersbury, Russia with choreography by Petipa/Ivanov, music by Tchaikovsky and decor by Botcharov..    Sugar Plum Fairy: Antoinette dell'era, Prince: Paul Gerdt


http://www.balletmin...l/NutFirst.html

Here is info from Kirov's website

"The Nutcracker" was originally based on a story written by German writer E.T.A. Hoffman. Tchaikovsky was commissioned to write the music in 1891 by the St. Petersburg Opera, but he was initially unhappy with the setting of a children's Christmas Party. The legendary choreographer Marius Petipa (first ballet-master to His Imperial Majesty the Tsar) presented Tchaikovsky with an exact scenario which he wanted, including the rhythm, tempo, and number of measures for each dance. Petipa later became ill, and the choreographic work was assumed by his assistant, Lev Ivanov.
Tchaikovsky, already in the final years of his life, experimented with a number of different tonalities. The divertissement which became known as the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy was composed for the celesta, using its bell-like tone. Tchaikovsky worked closely with Petipa and Ivanov in the production preparations, gradually losing his initial reservations about the setting.

"The Nutcracker" debuted on December 17, 1892, in the Mariinsky Theatre, which is still the home of the Kirov Ballet today. The original cast included ballet students, just as the Kirov Ballet and Kirov Academy production does today. Although popular inside of Russia, "The Nutcracker" was not performed outside of Russia until 1934, when Nicholas Sergeyev staged it at the Sadler's Wells Theatre in England. By that time in Russia, after the Revolution, the Russian presentation had been restaged by V. Vainonen.

Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo debuted a shortened version of "The Nutcracker" in the United States in 1940. The full-length ballet had to wait until the Kirov-trained George Balanchine created a new staging in 1954, which became the Nutcracker most American audiences came to know. The Balanchine production inspired many other versions throughout the world.

The Kirov Ballet/Kirov Academy version is a return to the pre-Balanchine, St. Petersburg roots of this timeless ballet. The music and the staging are done in their entirety, as close as possible to the production which Petipa and Tchaikovsky created over a century ago.

For this reason this production is called the original Nutcracker.



#25 carbro

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 03:18 PM

Thank you so much for the considerable effort that went into that post. :FIREdevil:
I was thinking -- too narrowly -- strictly in terms of choreography. I knew of Petipa's and Tchaikovsky's working relationship.

Upon completion of the score in the summer of 1892 Tchaikovsky wrote that the music he composed was "infinitely poorer than The Sleeping Beauty". . .

But isn't every ballet (qua ballet) score? Duh!

#26 Pamela Moberg

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 03:20 PM

Really lovely photos!
It might have something to do with photo technique in those days, people had to stand for a long time and it must have been difficult to maintain poses. Also, dance technique in those days wasnt what we see today.
My late teacher (she was born Princess Galitzine) always used to say that in those days a ballerina could do what an ordinary corps member does today. :rolleyes:

#27 Joseph

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Posted 29 July 2003 - 07:20 PM

Does anyone have the music for this ballet???
:wub:

#28 Mikhail

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 03:43 AM

ah

Edited by Mikhail, 30 July 2003 - 03:51 AM.


#29 Mikhail

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 03:45 AM

Well, I agree with RSE, Pierre Lacotte does exactly the same (may be with the better taste and knowledge). But he did not pretend to reconstruct ballets. I guess it is better to have La Sylphide, L’Ombre, Natalie, Marco Spada, The Pharaoh’s Daughter, etc. by Lacotte than nothing. The problem is whether he has enough imagination to create the ballets which are not similar to each other. By the way, I am extremely interested in his Giselle with the fugue of the wilis. Did anybody watch it live or on video?

Edited by Mikhail, 30 July 2003 - 03:46 AM.


#30 R S Edgecombe

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 05:45 AM

Mikhail, I too would love to see the wili fugue. I have a shrewd idea that Mary Skeaping used it in one of her productions ("overcomplete" one critic called them!), but I'm not sure. I am also very sorry that Lacotte left out the Bach fugue that Schneitzhoeffer included in the witches' scene in La Sylphide. Fugal writing poses a huge challenge to the choreographer.


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