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style in Paquita vs Don Q


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#16 Hans

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Posted 15 August 2003 - 07:23 PM

You might consider entitling it "Variation from 'Paquita.'" Simple, but dignified :).

#17 vanniai

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Posted 18 August 2003 - 12:54 PM

Yes! I did it, Hans... i was worried about name it like this because it could be confused with the Variation of Paquita (principal) But it's the best solution...
Thanks!

KISS: Keep It Simple...


And About my name :lol: , my name is Vannia, here my nickname is vanniai because my last name is Ibarguen :flowers: ... thank you so much for your comments about the applause, R S Edgecombe, I hope I'd dance Paquita well!!!
I used to paint butterflies (when I didn't know anything about the meaning), I painted a Vanessa Io that is simmilar to Vanessa Cardui, I'm gonna track about cardui here in Peru.

kisses!

#18 R S Edgecombe

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Posted 18 August 2003 - 02:13 PM

Vannia, I went straight to my butterfly encyclopaedia to find Vanessa io, but unfortunately it isn't there--only V dejeani from Java, and V itea and gonerilla (doesn't sound very nice, but it looks beautiful, like the Red Admiral you get in Britain). These are both from New Zealand. Do you know the ballet Piege lumiere by John Taras? It's about convicts (in South America, I think, but I'm not sure) and butterflies? I have always found the plot very interesting, though I don't know the music, and have never seen any parts of the ballet. It is associated with Rosella Hightower, one of those Nerina type dancers who attract me very much. Good luck once again with your variation. Be sure to let us know how it went!

#19 Mel Johnson

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Posted 18 August 2003 - 03:01 PM

I recall "Piege de Lumiere". I saw it in '64 or 5, I can't recall which, and it was at the New York State Theater with Maria Tallchief, Arthur Mitchell and André Prokovsky in the leads. It was quite beautiful, but looked very difficult, which cut into my enjoyment of it. The Damase music was kind of attractive, too. The set was color-mad even without the butterflies.

#20 R S Edgecombe

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Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:47 AM

How lucky you are, Mel. When you say colour-mad, do you mean gaudy? That's a pity, because I have always imagined vivid butterflies flitting through a sombre nocturne--something like Peter Farmer's design for Night Shadow, which I never saw, but which is reproduced on the box of the London Festival Ballet Gala. Andre Levasseur's costumes have invariably thrilled me, though the prima ballerina in Birthday Offering is a bit too bedizened, perhaps. Thanks for correcting the title of the ballet. Could you or Estelle please explain (to someone whose self-taught French is in a sorry state) why the preposition is necessary there whereas Paris is often referred to as la cite lumiere?

#21 Mel Johnson

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Posted 19 August 2003 - 02:54 AM

The effect wasn't gaudy. I was carried away by a sort of post-impressionist version of Guiana which had somehow worked its way back to near-realism. The lighting, I suspect, was somewhat higher than had been originally intended, as they were still working the kinks out of the new theater. My French is also rather limited to ordnance jargon, cookery and ballet terminology. My guess is that the "de" is there because John Taras or Philippe Heriat, the librettist, put it there.


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