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Buddy

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Posts posted by Buddy

  1. Here are some glances at the scenery for the new Ratmansky's Pharaoh's Daughter. I'm a big fan of the Pierre Lacotte production, including the beautiful scenery, so this one has big shoes to fill. Still, this new scenery is very impressive. The Mariinsky seems to have a knack. I've seen more impressive scenery and costumes at other companies, but the Mariinsky seems to get it just right.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CTmESt5tkLi/
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set?vanity=mariinsky.theatre&set=a.10160019711745798

    (thanks to Sophia at Dansomanie)

  2. 1 hour ago, ECat said:

    WOW!  That is exciting news for Victoria.  Thank you for the update. She is  beautiful dancer and I wish her much success at the Bolshoi!  It looks like she'll be making her debut as one of the Big Swans in Swan Lake.

    I'm sure that she's lovely, ECat. She's from the Mariinsky, so I take that for granted. 😊

    A characteristic that I've always enjoyed is her personality. It's charmingly adaptable and believable. Hopefully, the Bolshoi, which emphasises character, will take advantage of this.

  3. I've made comparisons here between this work and the White Swan Duet from "Swan Lake," which I still consider to be two of ballet's finest masterpieces. Although not a duet, it's a solo, I would also include Fokine's "The Swan" as one of the finest.

    I've never really tried to analyse the 'magic' of the White Swan duet, but while watching a video of an older and extremely lovely performance by the Mariinsky's Oxana Skorik, I felt that the remarkable sculpture achieved by the ballerina, is certainly a key element. In the duet from "A Midsummer Night's Dream" airiness seems to be essential.  Allegra Kent floats -- 'tiptoeing,' feet fluttering,  Jacques d'Amboise lifting. It fits so well with the enchanting Mendelssohn music and Shakespeare's dreamlike allusions.

    Added: In both these works, Expression is certainly essential -- the Aura of Enchantment created by the White Swan ballerina and the Character Voyage of the Midsummer Night's Dream interpreter.  


     

  4. Victoria Brileva, an artist that I've much enjoyed and often mentioned at the Mariinsky, has joined the Bolshoi. It seemed that she was given more than usual this year at the Mariinsky, which was good, and I wish her much success at the Bolshoi.

    "...new artists who had joined the troupe. These are Yulia Bondareva, Victoria Brileva, Arina Denisova, Elizaveta Doronina, Elizaveta Kiryakova, Maria Konkova, Eva Sergeenkova, Daria Sterligova, Sofya Ukhova, Elizaveta Chertikhina, Lina Sheveleva and Ivan Sorokin."(Google translation)

    https://www.bolshoi.ru/about/press/articles/none/gathering-2021/

    (thanks to Sophia at Dansomanie) 
     

  5. New video clip posted of Renata Shakirova doing Princess Florine (The Sleeping Beauty) from several years ago. It reminded me that she's 'holding down the fort' while the company is on vacation and the "Primorsky Stage of the Mariinsky Theatre" is performing. She has four scheduled appearances.
     

  6. 1 hour ago, Josette said:

    I love Illushkina, having seen her several times  in Emeralds nearly two years ago and then talking with her at a reception, but the s--l--o--w  tempo of the Symphony in C clip is excruciating to listen to and makes the choreography laborious.   Compare the tempo with the version we have all probably watched numerous times:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpg-BhbVaiU

    Nevertheless, I am overjoyed that she is being given roles and can't wait to see her on stage again. 

     

    Thanks, Josette, for this very fine comparison. I feel that Allegra Kent has taken George Balanchine's sometimes higher energy into the realm of high and perhaps sublime poetry, whereas Maria Iliushkina has made it more fairy-like magical, a velvet breeze. Both are very fine interpretations.

    For me, if you just abstract the beautiful flow and often elegant sculpture of all the Mariinsky dancers in their video, you have something quite wonderful. Maria Iliushkina accomplishes this as beautifully as I've ever seen her do.

  7. 10 hours ago, Drew said:

    I think this is a debut and and to my eyes seemed cautious at the beginning but as the adagio developed less and less so.  It's Mariinsky Balanchine--Illiushkina at her most powerful is less emphatic than exquisite and seems always to dance with a certain gentleness.  Anyway, I was won over--I find her lovely:

     

    As I keep saying, for me, she walks this fascinatingly charming line between a loveable, feeling her way, child and an accomplished artist. She's able to find her way back and forth with impressive mastery ('mistressery' 🙂).

    As I sense your general sentiments about the Mariinsky doing Balanchine, I'll just say that some days they shine much better than others and when they do it's quite commendable. "Less emphatic than exquisite" seems to work well for me with my favorite ("less emphatic than exquisite") Balanchine. 

    "Seems always to dance with a certain gentleness.  Anyway, I was won over--I find her lovely:"

    I agree.
     

  8. This is a nice almost thirty minute video of Nadezhda Batoeva and Vladimir Shklyarov rehearsing Act I of Don Quixote. 

    "They are coached by Galina Petrovna Kekisheva — a real bearer of the St. Petersburg ballet tradition, a graduate of the class of Agrippina Vaganova, in 1948–1971 a soloist with the Leningrad State Academic Kirov Theatre of Opera and Ballet."

    It's a finished rehearsal that moves along with very few double takes. Both dancers are charming, Nadezhda Batoeva, especially. It's also an act where dancers that I never thought could be like that, the Kitris in particular, really come alive as comic actors. 

    One of the first things that I noticed is how not tired Nadezhda Batoeva and Vladimir Shklyarov are in this highly energetic part of the ballet.  

    A lot is filmed from the side so that you get an unusual and very interesting new perspective.

    Galina Petrovna Kekisheva is one of those 'coaches' that I see year after year sitting modestly but elegantly in the box next to the stage. I'm never sure who most of them are, but they are a very lovely and apparently extremely capable group of individuals. Here you can see her gentle but highly accomplished and sensitive manner. It's something that's nice to observe. 


    I'll also make a comment not related to this video that I feel sometimes compelled to. There are a handful of highly talented female artists that I've seen in different companies whom because of their extreme thinness I'm unable to to watch comfortably and because of that, as talented as they are (or were), I don't comment on. I'd wish that their physical state would be noted and improved so that I, for one, can give them the recognition that they deserve in my posts.

    I hope that you enjoy this video. With so little live performing still available this is sort of nice.

    (Posted by the Mariinsky and thanks to Sophia at Dansomanie)

     

     

     


     

  9. I came across this along with the beautiful pictures and thought that I could include it here.

    After last year's virus laden season.

    "Happy New Year our dear audience, readers and ballet lovers." 
     

    Added: I just found this in another of the related videos and  thought that it might be appropriate.

    "Like a sculpture to be awaken by the power of Love… By the power of light and music that sounds from inside. There is Galatea in every of us. So give the true sense to the perfection of your lines enriching them with treasures of your soul."

     

     

  10. Here are some beautiful photos from the Moscow Academy's graduation performance. They include pictures of a young star, Eva Sergeenkova. She, and others(?), look like young Zakharovas. Can never have enough of those !  😊 

    https://www.lapersonne.com/post/bolshoi-ballet-academy-behindthecurtain/
    (Thanks to Sophia at Dansomanie for this information and the photos)

    'Funnyly,' I looked at the photos in the box, bottom of page lower left, and thought, "She sure looks a lot like Maria Kochetkova." Guess what !  Yep !  "Sleeping Beauty," in Kazan,  May 18, 2021.

    https://www.lapersonne.com/post/sleeping-beauty-backstage-kochetkova/

  11. 7 hours ago, silvermash said:

    I think she was not considered versatile enough for POB repertory compared to Park or O’Neill or Barbeau. However, in the past few years, she did a lot of contemporary pieces so perhaps it will change.

     

    I hope so, Silvermash, and thank you. I've actually  preferred the 'classical' works that I've seen at POB over the years, which is perhaps why a fine Odette/Odile would register so well with me. I felt somewhat the same about Veronika Part at ABT. She might not have had the range or versatility, but the classical ballets that she performed were some of the best performances that I've ever seen. 

  12. 18 hours ago, Marta said:

    Buddy said:

    As sort of an aside, I remember Veronika Part dancing one of her exceptional Swan Lakes with a partner that was relatively new to it. For me, she commands the stage completely, but this evening it seemed that she stood back somewhat in order to let him shine a bit more. I thought that it was a fine gesture, if in fact it was her intent.

    I was curious about the partner in the Swan Lake you mention.  I  loved Veronika Part and saw her In SL several times. I recall Stearns and Whiteside, neither of whom I liked.  Can't remember the other partner though.

    I believe that he was one of the two that you mentioned, Marta. He was having a better than usual night, from what I had read, and she seemed to me to be letting him take more of the  spotlight to encourage him.

    Thanks, California. We actually had a brief discussion.

    https://balletalert.invisionzone.com/topic/46164-abt-veronika-part-swan-lake/

  13. 26 minutes ago, miliosr said:

    It's hard to know exactly what her standing is (as compared to her rank.) Based on the published casting for the Roland Petit evening and Romeo and Juliet, I wouldn't say she's cast especially prominently. I don't see her name as one of the leads in any of the Petit one acts and I only see her cast as Rosaline in Romeo and Juliet. This in comparison to her fellow premieres Hannah O'Neill and Sae Eun Park, who are very prominently cast (the Petit evening for the former and Romeo and Juliet for the latter.)

    Thanks, Miliosr. I have to say again that she looked very good to me as Odette/Odile (Swan Lake) at the 2016 Mariinsky Festival, where I've seen some of the best in the world. 

  14. 4 hours ago, Roberta said:

    Buddy, you are correct in the ID'n of dancers and the five pdd's. The livestream included one very quick flash of a playbill, just before the initial number.

    I'm so grateful for the opportunity of seeing these ten wonderful ABT dancers perform live, that I'll overlook the less-than-optimal filming, missed entrances, missed start of Schevchenko's 32 fouettes in Don Q, etc. As a long-time ABT patron during their Met seasons, I was especially touched by seeing Forster as Romeo. Like many admirers, I'd waited for years to see him dance as a principal. I'm also glad that soloists Williams and Hoven got their chance to shine here, in the Gemma Bond piece. I'll admit to having a lump in my throat several times during this stream, camera quirks and all.

    Yes, Roberta, it was really nice to see live dance again. The announcer said that it's the first performance at the Center in fourteen months.

    I'm quite ballerina focused, so I'm glad that you pointed out your feelings about Thomas Forster and I join you in congratulating him. I often miss what the men are doing because they are intended to be somewhat invisible, but the ballerinas would never shine the way that they do without them.

    As sort of an aside, I remember Veronika Part dancing one of her exceptional Swan Lakes with a partner that was relatively new to it. For me, she commands the stage completely, but this evening it seemed that she stood back somewhat in order to let him shine a bit more. I thought that it was a fine gesture, if in fact it was her intent.

    I've seen a fair number of Odette/Odiles (Swan Lake), most of them quite fine, each one bringing something special, and I thought that Devon Teuscher, in her turn, did a very fine interpretation. I've always liked Hee Seo. She was invited to two Mariinsky Festivals and I thought that, in essence, she shone at both of them.

  15. ABT -- Dance at Dusk -- Live from LA

    For 45 minutes after more than a year offstage I thought that these performances were very respectable.

    Don Quixote pas de deux, performed by Christine Shevchenko and Joo Won Ahn. 

    Swan Lake pas de deux  Devon Teuscher? and Cory Stearns?    

    Romeo and Juliet pas de deux, performed by Hee Seo and Thomas Forster?

    A Time There Was  pas de deux,   Soloists Katherine Williams and Blaine Hoven (a work featuring choreography by ABT’s Gemma Bond and music by Benjamin Britten)

    Let Me Sing Forevermore? ("the Jessica Lang-Tony Bennett ballet," Roberta)   Cate Hurlin? and Aran Bell ?

    (Thanks, Maps and Roberta for dancer identification)

     I await the day when Christine Shevchenko delivers facially like she did in LA awhile ago as Gamzatti, a truly great acting performance !  She danced quite well this evening. Devon Teuscher and Hee Seo were just fine. A Time There Was was fine. 

    The last work, Let Me Sing Forevermore?, a sort of jazzy one, was fun. I was truly delighted by ABT's all jazz Indestructible Light in Costa Mesa with an all young cast and this one pointed in that direction. This sort of thing could work very well if of the quality of Indestructible Light. The two dancers certainly had the ability.

     

  16. "Interview – Former dancer Gavin Larsen on writing Being a Ballerina, the Power and Perfection of Dancing Life: Marina Harss, Fjord Review"

    "If you had a son or a daughter, would you want them to become a dancer?"

    "Yes. Yes, absolutely. It’s the most glorious feeling. To feel that kind of exuberance and beauty, full power and extension and stretch and the marriage with music while you’re doing it, and then the community of other people who feel that same thing. It’s priceless. Everyone should dance. Everyone should let their soul sing. I mean, the hard things about ballet are hard. But, as I said, never ever did it even occur to me that there was a question of the balance between input and output, until the very, very end."

    https://fjordreview.com/being-a-ballerina-gavin-larsen/
    (Thanks to Ian Macmillan at BalletcoForum)

  17. I'm still quite glued to Der Rosenkavalier: Erste Walzerfolge. That's okay since we have until June 17 to take in all of Vienna Waltzes. Having never looked at this work carefully there's so much that I could write about at first glance.

    What George Balanchine has done with the waltz as a point of department is very exciting. High swirling kick steps, arms way above the head, upper body sculpture, it's all new invention to this dance world. The women's flowing gowns, at one point, recall ancient Greek sculpture, the Winged Victory of Samothrace.

    1920px-Front_right_view_of_the_Nike_of_S

    Stories are being told. Elevated emotion expressed. All in the context of the waltz.

    Suzanne Farrell amplifies all this. She makes it all personal and godlike. Her backbend exit is one of the finest moments in dance that I've yet seen.

    Maria Kowroski is sophistication and fineness. Her dance is not as much an expression of life flowing intensity, like Suzanne Farrell, but more a heart-touching story being told, a woman in love.

    The way that the dance ensemble concludes in the Suzanne Farrell video has its differences. I'm noticing the feet more than anything. The footwork is very precise and exciting in its exactness and speed. There's expression in this virtuosity, even meaning. In the more current version, the dancing is more expansive, the feet are further apart. It's more of a spectacle that's been fine tuned over the years and has a fairytale elegance that's almost magical. The women's gowns sail through through the heavens -- Hollywood and Broadway elevated to the stars.

     

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