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Tolkien and ballet


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#46 BilboBaggins

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 02:28 PM

Interesting ... is there a corresponding "weighting" step?

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#47 Mel Johnson

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 02:46 PM

It's the "down" part of the pliť. And also a sense of connectedness to the floor that occurs in balances and jumps, where you are keenly aware of "pushing down to go up." Sort of like growing roots into the floor. It's easier to balance when you're conscious of that. And when the jump comes, there's an uprooting, where the foot is almost unwilling to surrender its hold on the floor, until it explodes into the air, as if carried away by a tornado!

#48 BilboBaggins

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 02:52 PM

Amazing ... almost the same words my nordic instructor used, almost 20 years ago!!

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#49 Mel Johnson

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 03:00 PM

There are many similarities! And as a matter of my opinion, skiers, figure skaters, ballet dancers, and Tolkienophiles are all especially fond of metaphor and simile as a form of expression. The differences come in how they use them.

#50 BilboBaggins

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 03:06 PM

As always, so right on target ... and so now, not speaking metaphorically (so very UNLIKE a hobbit), it's around 11.00 pm and I'm going to go off to sleep. Thanks, everyone, for a most enjoyable and educational evening!!

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#51 Mel Johnson

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Posted 08 February 2003 - 08:44 PM

An afterhours thought: Now, if Gaynor Minden wanted to really fix its hi-tech shoes, they should get in touch with WETA, the effects and production shop for the LotR movies. Some of the things they did can't be did!;)

#52 balletstar811

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Posted 09 February 2003 - 05:00 PM

Mr. Johnson, I am most likely mistaken on this one, because I plowed through The Hobbit , as I could not put it down, but... when Bilbo and company come across those elf parties in the forest of Mirkwood and then all the lights go out and all, did it say the elves were dancing? Or only feasting and talking? You do seem to know all about LOTR- it is truly excellent, isn't it?

#53 Mel Johnson

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Posted 09 February 2003 - 06:49 PM

I had to pull out my copy of The Hobbit and check pp. 132-134, where the Company invades the dinners of the Wood-Elves, but it only mentions eating, laughing, drinking, singing, and playing harps. But even JRRT goes so far as to say that the Wood-Elves were not as cultured as the High-Elves.
I picked up all four books in 1966, and I haven't put them down since. When the new materials came out, I acquired them and now have this weird library of Tolkien draft material that never made it to final form before he died.

#54 balletstar811

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 12:40 PM

Ah, 'tis truly an excellent collection to have! Now I am a new-comer to this series, I became interested after I saw the Fellowship of the Ring the movie. I purchased the set of books recently, and I am on the Fellowship. I love LOTR now!!! Those stories you mentioned earlier about an Elf dancing and someone falling in love with her... which book was this in? Or was it in one of the Appendices? And what exactly are the Appendices and what are in them?

#55 BilboBaggins

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 01:58 PM

Hi Balletstar811!

If you go to Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk (or Alibris.com, if you want autographed or rare editions) ... and enter "Tolkien" as the author (most people mis-spell it, so be careful!!), you'll find books by J.R.R. Tolkien (author of LOTR) and also his son Christopher. You can also find the full list at the Tolkien Society webpage, which IvyDancer posted in an earlier message.

The original texts are The Hobbit and LOTR, but JRR also wrote the Silmarillion, Tales of Tom Bombadil and a number of other Middle Earth texts (He was a professor of medeival language at Oxford and also has published professional works, such as a translation and commentary on the Beowulf epic, but we'll skip those). Christopher, once the Hobbit and LOTR really took off, edited many of the notes, alternate tales, drafts, background materials, etc., his father left into another series of books, including his master work, The History of Middle Earth. That amounts to about 12 volumes (in softcover, that's about $230) and covers all the Ages and has a tremendous amount of detail and background for LOTR ... As you might imagine, most people stop after The Hobbit and LOTR, some get to Silmarillion, and very few get to The History ...

Hope that helps!!

Regards,

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#56 Mel Johnson

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 03:52 PM

But the "Tale of Beren and Luthien" is in The Silmarillion. When the Tolkiens passed away, they were buried side-by-side, with JRRT's grave marked "Beren" and Edith's marked "Luthien". Isn't that beautiful?

#57 balletstar811

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 03:52 PM

Thank you very much Bilbo! Is this what the Appendices are? The History of Middle Earth? I heard that the tale of Arwen and Aragorn is in onw of them.... and my friend said everything that happened to each of the characters after Return of the King as well. Mr. Johnson, I would still likt to know about that Elvish tale... where was it located?

#58 balletstar811

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 03:54 PM

Whoops, sorry about that, you answered before I did! Why, indeed, I agree- how very touching!

#59 Mel Johnson

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 04:23 PM

What are commonly referred to as "The Appendices" are in the back of the "Return of the King" volume of LotR. More background and drafts are given in the other volumes of the History of Middle-Earth, but the finished form of "Beren and Luthien" is in The Silmarillion. Part of the History contains the drafts for this "prequel" that was finished by JRRT's son Christopher, whose writing is nowhere near as graceful as the Professor's. Incidentally, reading the drafts for LotR is a real hoot! Frodo was originally going to be Bingo! (Sounded like he hung around the parish hall on Wednesday nights or something!;) ) Eventually Bingo Baggins became a great-uncle.

#60 dancermom2

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 06:15 PM

The appendices has a story about what happens to the characters after LOTR. It tells of Aragorn and Arwen, Legolas and Gimli, Sam, Merry and Pippen. I never read it the first time around but read it this time after I picked it up again. I found it to be very interesting to see, albiet briefly, what happens to them in the years after The Return of the King.


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