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Romeo & Juliet - Spring 2012


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#46 puppytreats

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:35 AM

NY Times states: "Mr. Hallberg is a completely rounded Romeo: he’s both patrician and rebellious, brave and overwhelmed, conscientious and defiant."

Is this Romeo? I think I saw another ballet.

#47 annamicro

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 06:10 AM

NY Times states: "Mr. Hallberg is a completely rounded Romeo: he’s both patrician and rebellious, brave and overwhelmed, conscientious and defiant."

Is this Romeo?


I'd say yes.
I don't undestand if the critic is to the reviewer or the performer.

#48 annamicro

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 06:15 AM

It has been simply pointed out above that one of the NY Times pictures refutes a factually incorrect statement made on this thread about Monday's performance.


Are we sure that they were taken at the same performance? :-) I don't know about ABT habits, but companies usually have photoshoots at dress rehearsals.

I for one liked all the pictures


Honestly I didn't: I think some are quite bad ballet photos, n1 and 5 especially.

#49 Nyankeesy01

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 09:51 PM

Are we sure that they were taken at the same performance? :-) I don't know about ABT habits, but companies usually have photoshoots at dress rehearsals.


I think they were probably taken in dress rehearsals earlier in the day. From what I know, they tend to take the pics then, rather than during the actual performance. But who knows?

#50 NinaFan

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 07:13 AM


Her larger than life portrayal carried over into an actual physical over stepping of the stage at times. The Met stage is pretty big and if not big enough for her, it's all we've got, short of building her a new theater. She needs to learn to pace herself space wise so she doesn't step "out of frame" into the wings and out of the light as she is wont to do. Also, in the opening of the balcony scene she was totally out of light, hidden a bit upstage. If that was a "choice" it's misguided. Someone needs to tell her her marks for lighting. Odd that she couldn't "feel the moon" on her face. I guess I'm in the minority here, but I felt little passion between Osipova and Hallberg.


Sounds like perhaps a partial-view seat. There are many of those at the Met---many more than the management would officially admit. Osipova was certainly always "in the frame" (unlike in "Bayadere" where she did finish a variation inside the wing). She was very clearly visible throughout the opening of the balcony scene, "felt the moon" on her face---it was actually a very beautiful moment, and the passion between her and Hallberg was quite obvious from seat E12 in the orchestra.

As for the curtain call after the balcony scene, just plain poor taste.


As a practical matter, it's difficult to see what else they could have done. The audience just wouldn't leave for the intermission and wouldn't stop clapping. For a very, very, very long time. This was very unusual for ABT. I think their coming out for a bow was the only reasonable solution.



I hope I am pasting the quotes above correctly - please excuse me if they have not pasted properly

My comments:
Osipova/Hallberg’s Romeo and Juliet: While most members on Ballet Alert seemed to love the performance, I was quite surprised to read the negative comments such as “over the top” with regard to Osipova. I was at Monday night’s performance and thought it was spectacular, and in a class by itself. I have seen many of the world's greatest ballerinas dance Juliet, many of which have simply blown me away. I expected a lot from Osipova, but once again, she surpassed all expectations. WOW! I can't even begin to describe it, except to say, that both dancers were truly committed and believable. Natasha was so in the role that my entire heart simply ached, and I had to keep from crying. The audience was so engrossed, that you could hear a pin drop. The connection between this pair of dancers is very special, even down to David’s gentle kiss on Natasha’s forehead during the final curtain calls.

As far as the curtain call at the first intermission…that was brought on by the insistence of the audience. The dancers had no choice but to finally come out. The lights were on, and the audience demanded to show their appreciation. It may not be the custom, but I think it is unfair to pick on ABT for allowing it. The curtain was down, the house lights on, and they took a curtain call at the intermission.

On to the comment about Osipova’s face in the moonlight. I saw her face very clearly from my orchestra seat. I always make it a point of sitting on the left side of the orchestra for Romeo and Juliet so that I am sure to see the balcony scene clearly. Monday night was no exception. Osipova was not in the shadows. To quote Ilya: “She was very clearly visible throughout the opening of the balcony scene, "felt the moon" on her face”

#51 Batsuchan

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 10:29 AM

Here are some gorgeous photos from Friday's Vishneva/Gomes performance (mostly of the bows/curtain calls):
http://angeladebona-diary.com/?p=368

It was so adorable/touching to see their mutual affection and gratitude!

#52 melissaga

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 06:33 PM

Like Macauay, I also saw R+J 5 times this season, albeit different casts. The leads I saw were Xiomara Reyes/Herman Cornejo, Gillian Murphy/Cory Stearns, Natalia Osipova/David Hallberg, Paloma Herrera/Marcelo Gomes and Hee Seo/Alexandre Hammoudi.

It was interesting to read the criticisms of Osipova in this thread. She was one of my favorite Juliet this season for the same reason others disliked her performance. Juliet is a 14 yr old girl. I often feel that Juliet starts young, but suddenly rapidly ages once she falls in love with Romeo. In many performances, she suddenly goes from being a little girl to a mature woman. I find that transition to rough. I think Juliet is a wealthy, rather spoiled, young teen. I felt the adolescent, impetuous nature of Juliet throughout Osipova's performance. I also felt that Hee Seo kept Juliet young throughout the entire performance. Gillian Murphy, Xiomara Reyes and Paloma Herrera all went through that rapid aging that I personally dislike.


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