Jump to content


Handel's Music


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#16 artist

artist

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts

Posted 30 March 2007 - 03:43 PM

Artist: have you listened to any of Handel's operas? Some of those arias can break your heart. Some would make you laugh. Most are meltingly beautiful.

Maybe you might give Handel another chance.


Artist, let me recommend that you check out Handel's vocal music -- especially his arias. you'll find melancholy there of a kind you wouldn't expect -- SO beautiful, so romantic, really moving. His operas are so rich with emotion. Try "Giulio cesare" -- you may be able to Google "V'adoro pupille," Cleopatra's aria. Heart-breakingly beautiful.


I have actually been trying very hard to enjoy operas more. But I did listen to "V'adoro pupille", as you kindly recommended Paul Parish, and I do think that the singing and words are lovely. I wouldn't have said 'heart-breakingly beautiful', but then again, I probably don't enjoy opera as much as others do [unfortunately]. When I listened to only the instrumental parts, I found the same feeling I do when listening to Handel's other pieces. ? (I'm sorry-I'm sorry!!) But as for his operas, I will always be willing to listen!

#17 richard53dog

richard53dog

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts

Posted 30 March 2007 - 04:55 PM


Artist: have you listened to any of Handel's operas? Some of those arias can break your heart. Some would make you laugh. Most are meltingly beautiful.

Maybe you might give Handel another chance.


Artist, let me recommend that you check out Handel's vocal music -- especially his arias. you'll find melancholy there of a kind you wouldn't expect -- SO beautiful, so romantic, really moving. His operas are so rich with emotion. Try "Giulio cesare" -- you may be able to Google "V'adoro pupille," Cleopatra's aria. Heart-breakingly beautiful.


I have actually been trying very hard to enjoy operas more. But I did listen to "V'adoro pupille", as you kindly recommended Paul Parish, and I do think that the singing and words are lovely. I wouldn't have said 'heart-breakingly beautiful', but then again, I probably don't enjoy opera as much as others do [unfortunately]. When I listened to only the instrumental parts, I found the same feeling I do when listening to Handel's other pieces. ? (I'm sorry-I'm sorry!!) But as for his operas, I will always be willing to listen!



Another of Cleopatra's arias that you might "connect" with is Piangero, la Sorte Mia. Cleopatra is all alone and is mouring where life has taken her. It's a very slow aria but as a contrast the soprano line goes up and down. Very mournfull

(Giulio Cesare is another of my favorite operas)

#18 drb

drb

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,508 posts

Posted 30 March 2007 - 06:23 PM

A very timely e-note from Paul Taylor just popped into my In-box. It begins

One of Paul Taylor's favorite composers of all time is baroque master George Frideric Handel, whose music the choreographer first used in 1962 with the groundbreaking Aureole, and returned to in 1978 with Airs...

and continues with a recommendation to see Handel's opera Flavio at NYC Opera. It concludes with an offer to save 35% on your tickets (up to four):

Order online and submit promo code FLCG
Call CenterCharge at 212-721-6500 and mention code FLCG
...
FLAVIO PERFORMANCES:
Wed Apr 4 7:30
Fri Apr 6 8:00
Sun Apr 8 1:30
Tue Apr 10 7:30
Thu Apr 12 7:30
Sat Apr 14 1:30
Sat Apr 21 8:00



#19 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,199 posts

Posted 30 March 2007 - 10:28 PM

My two favorite pieces of Handel vocal music are tied to specific performances: Lawrence Tibbett singing "Where'eer You Walk" from Semele -- alas not available on any available commercial recording I know of; George Jellinek played in on "The Vocal Scene" many years ago -- and Lorraine Hunt Lieberson singing "Ombra mai fu" from Xerxes (also called Serse), which is available on her "Handel Arias" CD. The latter, especially, is so personal. In the March 2007 issue of Opera News, in a review of a posthumous release of "Neruda Songs" by her widower, Peter Lieberson, F. Paul Driscoll wrote,

Hunt Lieberson fills Neruda Songs with sung surpassing tranquility and simplicity, as if she had all the time in the world still left to her. That was her gift: she could make time stop.


Earlier, she brought the same quality to "Ombra mai fu."

#20 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 06 April 2007 - 06:55 AM

I believe that Balanchine did something for the extroverted Water Music and Fireworks music. Has anyone seen this? How did it go? Is it still in rep?


The Balanchine to which you refer was "The Figure in the Carpet" which was created as a response to the opening of the Iranian Trade Mission to the United States, an association which would hardly act as an audience draw today. I only saw it once, when I was a student, and it was sort of confusing, with images from Britain, Persia, France and several places I knew not where. I think that only a few short musical numbers from this work survive in either kinescope or early tape technology.

#21 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,199 posts

Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:46 AM


I believe that Balanchine did something for the extroverted Water Music and Fireworks music. Has anyone seen this? How did it go? Is it still in rep?


The Balanchine to which you refer was "The Figure in the Carpet"
...
I think that only a few short musical numbers from this work survive in either kinescope or early tape technology.

There's a short clip to the Handel section danced by Diana Adams in the PBS Balanchine bio.

#22 drb

drb

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,508 posts

Posted 09 April 2007 - 04:05 AM

More bargain-priced Handel. Looks like 20% off, plus the new Met Museum Gallery (link to a guided tour on the Met Opera site):
Giulio Cesare...


Today's Times has a quite favorable review of Handel's Giulio Ceasar, including complex audio/video with Ruth Ann Swenson singing and discussing her battle with breast cancer and concerns with her future at the Met. Rather emotional material.
http://www.nytimes.c...rts&oref=slogin

...And what a stunning opera. In Act II, when Ms. Swenson’s Cleopatra, disguised as the queen’s attendant, spins entrancing lyrical lines in an act of seduction, Mr. Daniels’s captivated Cesare sings, “Not even heaven has a melody to equal such a song.” He was right.



#23 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 21 April 2007 - 02:51 PM

Sir Thomas Beecham arranged quite a lovely ballet out of Handel, entitled "Love in Bath" about the elopement of Richard Brinsley Sheridan and Elizabeth Linley. It sounds like fun, but I've never heard of a choreographer tackling it. It's only one act, but seems to have "second act problems" in the middle of the show.

#24 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 22 April 2007 - 06:04 AM

Beecham also set, famously, "The Gods go a-Begging", which was picked up by Ninette de Valois. There's also another of his Handel arrangements out there called "The Origin of Design", which was supposed to be a ballet, but I don't know if anybody ever set it. There's also "Amaryllis", the purpose of which I'm not certain, but it was an orchestration of salon music by Handel written for the family of George II. The "Love in Bath" score is supposedly a suite from an early ballet score, "The Great Elopement". It must have been a very overlong work, as the suite is overlong, as I've suggested above.

#25 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 22 April 2007 - 06:36 PM

Let's not forget that Taylor also used Handel for "Aureole".

#26 artist

artist

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts

Posted 22 April 2007 - 09:23 PM

Yes, yes, yes! You have no idea how many times I've written, spoken too producers, and tried to myself get arts organizations, n.p.o's, and media outlets to work together to cross-promote or co-produce projects/performances. (My favorite instance was a WGBH "Masterpiece Theatre" with Helen Mirren about Caravaggio and a CONCURRENT Caravaggio exhibit in Hartford (v.rare) that was never cross-promoted.) Or even doing something as obvious as scheduling a "Dracula" performance in late October, (VERY easy to cross-promote: hey everyone tired of the 'trick-or-treating', spooky houses & hayrides--why not try something really different?! etc.etc.) or "R&J" mid-February. Trite, obvious, a 'dumbing down' maybe, but also quick money (a la Nutcrackers in Dec.) that enables more adventurous fare later.
Apologies for off-topic.

I do like that idea. I think it would help the arts in a way of exposure to a variety of audiences. Yes, money is always the issue, but in the long run I think it'll help for the better of ballet in getting more (who don't ordinarily watch) to view it and then it goes on from there. Anything to help!! Sorry, too, for off topic.

#27 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 24 April 2007 - 09:33 AM

The sub-topic that has developed here -- concerning joint marketing schemes between different arts organizations -- has a lot of interesting and useful implications for ballet.

I've split the topic off and given it its own thread on the Issues in Ballet forum.

Those wanting to report interesting experiments -- or brainstorm what could be done for the benefit of ballet organizations -- are urged to join the discussion HERE. :)


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):