Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Apollo -- which approach? which dancers?


  • Please log in to reply
79 replies to this topic

#46 kfw

kfw

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,320 posts

Posted 02 April 2007 - 05:00 PM

I agree with dirac. I'm not bothered by Garis' ego, I'm thrilled to hop into the time machine and watch and contemplate "the Balanchine Enterprise" with an observer so thoughtful, sensitive, musically knowledgeable and emotionally involved with what he's experiencing.

For example, from pages 77-8 of the original hardback: "And so at the end, Apollo and the muses did not mount to Parnassus but instead moved around a stage which now represented no illusioned space. This makes a tremendous difference. When Apollo and the muses leave, they leave us behind in our mortality. This is what the music seems to say in its reiterated cry of lamentation dying away at the end, and it is what the old version of the ballet used to say, simply and effectively, as the four immortals waited motionlessly on the staircase for their chariot."

Agree or disagree with his opinion, but that's good writing.

#47 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 02 April 2007 - 06:06 PM

As dirac and kfw say, there's much that's insightful, valuable, and even well-written in the Garis book. Those parts give it importance as an historical record and weight as a a book of critical insights into Balanchine's work and the achievements of his company.

For this reader, however, there's also much that's overly subjective, obscure, long-winded, self-indulgent, and ... strangely irritating.

A good book? A mixed bag? A curate's egg? Take your pick.

#48 Farrell Fan

Farrell Fan

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,930 posts

Posted 02 April 2007 - 06:38 PM

Okay, there are isolated passages that are quotable, but the book as a whole gave me acute indigestion.

#49 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,516 posts

Posted 03 April 2007 - 09:37 AM

I agree with dirac. I'm not bothered by Garis' ego, I'm thrilled to hop into the time machine and watch and contemplate "the Balanchine Enterprise" with an observer so thoughtful, sensitive, musically knowledgeable and emotionally involved with what he's experiencing.

For example, from pages 77-8 of the original hardback: "And so at the end, Apollo and the muses did not mount to Parnassus but instead moved around a stage which now represented no illusioned space. This makes a tremendous difference. When Apollo and the muses leave, they leave us behind in our mortality. This is what the music seems to say in its reiterated cry of lamentation dying away at the end, and it is what the old version of the ballet used to say, simply and effectively, as the four immortals waited motionlessly on the staircase for their chariot."

Agree or disagree with his opinion, but that's good writing.


Thank you for reminding me of that fine passage, kfw.

#50 macnellie

macnellie

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 101 posts

Posted 28 January 2012 - 09:05 PM

Watched a documentary of Nureyev recently. There was a brief excerpt of his Apollo and I wanted to see more! Does anyone know of this video? Is it with the Joffrey?
Thanks

#51 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,453 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 08:58 AM

the NYPL dance coll. has filmed excerpts of APOLLO w/ Nureyev and the following companies, mostly in rehearsal:
Ballet de Theatre Colon
Vienna State Opera Ballet
Dutch National Ballet (this seems to be the most professional of the films, as it was telecast)
Ballet de Grand Theatre de Geneve
Royal Ballet
Paris Opera Ballet

#52 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,646 posts

Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:14 PM

Frustrating news -- after several seasons performing the mid-career Apollo (birth scene and stairs) as staged by Francia Russell, Pacific Northwest Ballet is going to do the later version with no birth and no stairs (and so no ending on the stairs). I know, I know -- it was his ballet to change if he wanted to -- but I really love the older version.

Sigh.

#53 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,332 posts

Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:16 PM

Disappointing news.

I think the reason I didn't love Ib Andersen's Apollo as much as I expected was that he didn't get to do the opening development by the time I saw him with NYCB. Happily, he's staged the full version for his company.

#54 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:20 AM

Frustrating news -- after several seasons performing the mid-career Apollo (birth scene and stairs) as staged by Francia Russell, Pacific Northwest Ballet is going to do the later version with no birth and no stairs (and so no ending on the stairs).

I wonder what the rationale for this is. Aesthetic preference? A sense that the older version is somehow old-fashioned? Desire to shorten the performance time?

#55 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,332 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 08:52 AM

One rationale can always be that the shorter version is the one Balanchine preferred. Also, if Boal is staging the ballet, that is the version that he danced and that he knows. According to the Balanchine Catalog, the birth scene was removed in 1979 for a revival with Baryshnikov,. Boal might have seen the work with the birth scene until about age 14, but not at NYCB after that.

#56 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,646 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:18 AM

wonder what the rationale for this is. Aesthetic preference? A sense that the older version is somehow old-fashioned? Desire to shorten the performance time?


I think probably that this shorter version is the one that Balanchine preferred, and it's the one that's most often performed today. I am just an old-fashioned girl when it comes to Apollo, I guess!

#57 California

California

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,554 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:26 AM

Frustrating news -- after several seasons performing the mid-career Apollo (birth scene and stairs) as staged by Francia Russell, Pacific Northwest Ballet is going to do the later version with no birth and no stairs (and so no ending on the stairs). I know, I know -- it was his ballet to change if he wanted to -- but I really love the older version.

I really miss the stairs at the end, which can be seen in the Balanchine biography DVD (with Farrell and Martins). That doesn't involve more time, so what's the explanation? The stairs did look very narrow and risky. But I can't think of other explanations. Does anybody know?

#58 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,332 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:31 AM

It does involve hazard pay. However the official short version ends with the AT&T logo starburst, and to add the stairs would mean an exception from the Balanchine Trust.

#59 California

California

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,554 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:43 AM

The higher cost alone might explain things in this day and age. Repeating the starburst is an acceptable ending, but it doesn't capture the ascent to the heavens/eternity of the music at the very end. At least we have the stairs on tape, available for purchase!

#60 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,516 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 10:51 AM

Frustrating news -- after several seasons performing the mid-career Apollo (birth scene and stairs) as staged by Francia Russell, Pacific Northwest Ballet is going to do the later version with no birth and no stairs (and so no ending on the stairs). I know, I know -- it was his ballet to change if he wanted to -- but I really love the older version.

Sigh.


He also cut some great music. Farrell said in her book she was sufficiently surprised by that to remark on it to him - "You don't usually cut music like that." "No, I don't," he replied. End of discussion. ("Shut up, he explained.")


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):