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London Bridge is down. It was just a little over a year ago we had a thread for the funeral services of her husband. Didn't think it would be this soon. (Of course, a part of me didn't think it would happen at all - she's always been there!)

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The most elaborate plans are for what happens if she passes away at Balmoral, where she spends three months of the year. This will trigger an initial wave of Scottish ritual. First, the Queen’s body will lie at rest in her smallest palace, at Holyroodhouse, in Edinburgh, where she is traditionally guarded by the Royal Company of Archers, who wear eagle feathers in their bonnets. Then the coffin will be carried up the Royal Mile to St Giles’s cathedral, for a service of reception, before being put on board the Royal Train at Waverley station for a sad progress down the east coast mainline. Crowds are expected at level crossings and on station platforms the length of the country – from Musselburgh and Thirsk in the north, to Peterborough and Hatfield in the south – to throw flowers on the passing train. (Another locomotive will follow behind, to clear debris from the tracks.) “It’s actually very complicated,” one transport official told me.

 

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13 hours ago, dirac said:

London Bridge is down. It was just a little over a year ago we had a thread for the funeral services of her husband. Didn't think it would be this soon. (Of course, a part of me didn't think it would happen at all - she's always been there!)

 

The Drury has announced that the Monday matinee of Nureyev Legend will go on as scheduled:

"In accordance with the wishes of the Royal Household, performances will continue until further notice.

https://lwtheatres.co.uk/whats-on/nureyev-legend-and-legacy/

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The Royal Opera House canceled its programs yesterday, and it must have been a last-minute change given that Queen Elizabeth's death was announced at 6:30 pm, and Don Giovanni was supposed to begin a half hour later. (The relevant tweet was posted at exactly 7:00 pm.) Otherwise performances seem to be going ahead as planned, apart from the day of the funeral.

 

Edited by volcanohunter
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When they played the national anthem before the performance last night we all stood and I heard a few people at the back of the amphi begin to sing, the singers grew in number and for 'long to reign over us, God save the King'. everyone in the auditorium was singing.

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1 hour ago, abatt said:

At Queen Elizabeth’s Funeral, the Choreography of Public Mourning - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

This article may be of interest.  I have been mesmerized by the pageantry of   the  events related to the funeral.  

Here's a quote:

"But the ceremony wasn’t just notable for the remarkable precision and timing of its participants. It was also notable for its use of stillness and silence; the absolute immobility required at various points from the thousands of troops, and from the members of the royal family marching behind the coffin. The intentional discipline of these moments, before the dramatic striking of a staff, the command of an officer or the start of “God Save the King,” were as theatrical and emotionally powerful as any great stage performance.

Movement has meaning. But just as we may not understand the gestural intention of a dancer’s mime in a ballet, we don’t have to comprehend the meanings of every formalized twirl of a baton, reversal of a rifle, or hierarchy of a formation to feel the comforting accrual of tradition and history that inform them."

I found the (apparently unique) "Vigil of the 8 Grandchildren" fascinating, and creepy. And I realized later that what made it creepy for me was the fact that the grandchildren were all turned to face outwards (with heads bowed). And very much put on display before the public wandering past the platform. I've been pondering the symbolic meaning of that gesture ever since.

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2 hours ago, abatt said:

At Queen Elizabeth’s Funeral, the Choreography of Public Mourning - The New York Times (nytimes.com)

This article may be of interest.  I have been mesmerized by the pageantry of   the  events related to the funeral.  

I have as well, abatt. You don't see ritual like this every day. In fact it got so I recognized the Grenadiers who were given the task of toting Her Majesty's coffin hither and thither.  As the article says, they performed admirably.

Charles allowed the proclaiming of the king in the courtyard to be filmed for the first time. Talk about a blast from the past.

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I found the (apparently unique) "Vigil of the 8 Grandchildren" fascinating, and creepy. And I realized later that what made it creepy for me was the fact that the grandchildren were all turned to face outwards (with heads bowed). And very much put on display before the public wandering past the platform. I've been pondering the symbolic meaning of that gesture ever since.

The Vigil of the Princes doesn't have that long of a pedigree, since the first one was held for George V. It was neither filmed nor photographed, and it probably lasted longer than fifteen minutes. I believe they face outward because they are forming a kind of guard. I think that the grandkids' vigil is the first of its kind, and I rather hope it's the last. After a certain point it becomes a gimmick and not a gesture.

The funeral service itself was a bit disappointing, although the interior of the Abbey is awe-inspiring. The choral singing was beautiful.

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I too have been mesmerized by the pageantry and choreography, and also the Princess of Wales' outfits and hairstyles. It all puts me very much in mind of the first section of Union Jack - the marching, the precision, the elaborate outfits (almost otherworldly), and especially the slowness, stopping, and silences. If the events around the Queen's funeral inspire a revival of Union Jack, I won't be sorry. 

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I also liked Judith Weir's setting of Psalm 42, "Like as the Hart Desireth the Water-brooks," another piece of new music for the occasion.

Unfortunately the organ music was often hard to hear because of the commentators talking over it.

Later on there was another striking moment that was filmed for the first time, the removal of the scepter, orb, and crown one by one from the coffin, the symbols of royalty taken away as she arrived at her final resting place.

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