Jump to content
This Site Uses Cookies. If You Want to Disable Cookies, Please See Your Browser Documentation. ×

Wednesday, May 5


Recommended Posts

An excerpt from a new book, Turning Pointe: How a New Generation of Dancers Is Saving Ballet from Itself by Chloe Angyal.

Quote

This bias adds yet another obstacle to the already hard road for aspiring women choreographers, even those who enjoy advantages Schreier did not. Even for white women who belong, or have belonged, to ballet companies, there are structural barriers to entry. The first will be unsurprising by now, given all we’ve learned about how girls and women are valued and trained in ballet. Choreography requires creativity; ballet teaches girls the importance of conformity. Choreographing requires finding and using your voice; ballet rewards girls and women for silence. Choreography is a form of leadership; ballet punishes girls and women who aren’t obedient. From their earliest days, girls in ballet learn that what is valuable about them is not their mind or their creative spirit but their body and their ability to follow instructions.

 

Link to comment

A review of Sarasota Ballet.

Quote

Danielle Brown and Ricardo Graziano dance the pas deux with romantic grace but without the fervour of a performance for a responsive audience. Though they indicate with apprehensive glances that something ominous is about to happen, they can’t foresee the melodrama of the conclusion. Tall Richard House, bald headed and bare bodied beneath his voluminous cloak (apart from an eye-catching loincloth) is revealed, standing on a set of stairs. He enfolds the lovers in his white cloak, exposing each in turn as they huddle beneath his arms. They tumble headfirst down the steps, lying still with their legs neatly crossed over each other’s, poignantly reaching hands just touching in death. Without the context of a bravura gala, the piece feels preposterous.

 

Link to comment

A preview of Hong Kong Ballet in "Jewels"

Quote

“My intention with Jewels is to have Hong Kong Ballet’s unique face reflected,” Webre says. “We’re a fusion but also Asian company. Our dancers are fine technicians, but they haven’t done a lot of Balanchine. What Balanchine did was turn up the volume and speed of classical ballet. Over the last three years, I’ve been focusing on the dancers’ speed, attack and musicality. Our dancers’ technique is at the highest level. There’s also a youthful energy and buoyancy. This will be reflected on stage.”

 

Link to comment
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...