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Friday, January 29


dirac

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A review of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

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If you have to watch streamed full-length ballets, you probably could do not much better than San Francisco’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream” (available until February 10). This jewel received a single on-stage performance last April, the night before the SF Opera House closed. With a different cast, recorded last summer, it will have to do until sometime after the Company returns live. Yet Frank Zamacona’s superb direction for the screen lets the camera be our eyes without distracting editing. The only note of sadness -- besides those inevitable in the medium -- is the second act where all, of a sudden, the dancers look so shrunken.

 

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San Francisco Ballet opens its digital season.

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Following Midsummer, the company offers programs of three world premieres, conceived for film, including Mrs. Robinson, based on the Hollywood classic The Graduate, and two additional story ballets, Tomasson’s signature takes on Romeo & Juliet and Swan Lake, presented back-to-back in May.

 

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Boston Ballet moves out of YMCA space after 11 years.

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The Lynch/van Otterloo Y has partnered with Boston Ballet to offer ballet classes on the North Shore since the Y first opened in 2009. This partnership was supported by a capital gift from Belinda and the late Henri Termeer.

 

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The history of ballet, in brief.

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The Queen's patronage of the ballet began a long history of French royal interest in the new style of dance. The ballet de cour remained an important part of royal entertaining. King Louis XIV—known for his opulent palace at Versailles—gained his nickname “the Sun King” from his role as Apollo in a performance of the dance Ballet de la Nuit in 1653. Under the Sun King's rule, ballet became a more formal discipline. The Académie Royale de Danse was founded in 1661, and dance masters set to work standardizing notation for choreography. The five standard positions of ballet date from the this time in late 17th-century France.

 

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