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Chloe Angyal on ballet in crisis/racial tension


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I was delighted to find that writer/journalist Chloe Angyal has written a book on the current state of ballet (due out in spring 2021) and has started doing interviews. Her first was with ABC radio (Australia's version of NPR or CBC radio). After a short chit-chat with the host about her mandatory 2-week hotel quarantine after returning to Australia from the US, she gave a succinct summary of how the current state of ballet (and the arts in general) is clashing with the COVID-19 pandemic and Black Lives Matter movement, revealing the deep issues in the underlying systems and woven into the larger cultures (she specifically mentions the US, the UK, and Australia). I'll be looking forward to reading her book!

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/drawingroom/turning-pointe/12486726

Edited by kylara7
Fixed typo
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Thank you for this, kylara7. I found the whole interview insightful. 
In particular, I found the part where it was expressed that, moving forward, holding companies accountable will be the most important of all: 

“You posted your black square on Instagram. Now what?”

Precisely.

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2 hours ago, Mashinka said:

What is this lady's actual link to the ballet world?  A google search brought up nothing.

She has a web site and seems to do a lot of writing on dance and related topics: https://chloesangyal.com/

Her credentials include:

I have a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales and a BA in Sociology from Princeton University. My academic work focused on Hollywood romantic comedies; my doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power.

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Posted (edited)

I placed a hyperlink to her bio/webpage when I wrote the original post, and the interview addresses her personal connection. 

Edited by kylara7
Clarity
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On 7/28/2020 at 2:35 AM, Mashinka said:

What is this lady's actual link to the ballet world?  A google search brought up nothing.

Angyal is a self-described ballet fan, who took lessons in childhood, but by her admission didn't have much aptitude for it.

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On 7/28/2020 at 7:06 AM, California said:

 

I have a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales and a BA in Sociology from Princeton University. My academic work focused on Hollywood romantic comedies; my doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power.

How interesting....

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She has an impressive background. 
As a general viewpoint, I do not believe one must have had a career as a professional dancer in order to write well on the subject of dance.

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2 minutes ago, Dégagé said:

As a general viewpoint, I do not believe one must have had a career as a professional dancer in order to write well on the subject of dance.

Just to voice my agreement. Some of our most respected critics/historians/writers on dance were never dancers -- Robert Gottlieb, Arlene Croce, Selma Jeanne Cohen, many more. Writing is an art form in itself and draws on different skills of observation and articulateness. While some professional dancers do go on to be excellent writers (Deborah Jowitt and Nancy Reynolds come to mind), they seem to be the exception more than the rule.  

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I don't think anyone suggested that professional dance experience is required to become a good dance writer. Angyal's experience is probably similar to that of many ballet lovers and highlights the lasting benefit of childhood exposure to ballet lessons. A number of studies, including those conducted by the NEA, have found links between childhood participation in activities and continued "consumption" of them in adulthood. The question of Angyal's connection to the ballet world was raised, that's all. 

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