Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

My partner and I have really been enjoying the Met Opera's rebroadcasts over the past two weeks. This was a great idea on the part of the Met, generous and well timed. My only beef is why not start the broadcasts earlier in the day, like maybe 6:00pm, especially for Wagner Week. My favorite so far has been the 2007 Eugene Onegin - why did they EVER feel the need to replace that beautiful production?? Last night's Das Rheingold was just so so beautiful, and right now I'm hoping I can make it to the beautiful end of Die Walkure... probably not, but I'll get back to it before dinner tomorrow (since I have no commute time anymore). Having seen this cast in the theatre, I vividly remember how shatteringly beautiful it is. And can't wait for Barber of Seville next week. So there are some silver linings...

Edited by cobweb
question - is there not a single Mozart opera in the whole series?

Share this post


Link to post

Cobweb, we are amazingly on the same page with all of your comments. I was never an opera fan until the Met started their live broadcasts into movie theaters. Now I'm really enjoying the rebroadcasts. I also enjoy a podcast called, Aria Code.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, cobweb said:

My partner and I have really been enjoying the Met Opera's rebroadcasts over the past two weeks. This was a great idea on the part of the Met, generous and well timed. My only beef is why not start the broadcasts earlier in the day, like maybe 6:00pm, especially for Wagner Week. My favorite so far has been the 2007 Eugene Onegin - why did they EVER feel the need to replace that beautiful production?? Last night's Das Rheingold was just so so beautiful, and right now I'm hoping I can make it to the beautiful end of Die Walkure... probably not, but I'll get back to it before dinner tomorrow (since I have no commute time anymore). Having seen this cast in the theatre, I vividly remember how shatteringly beautiful it is. And can't wait for Barber of Seville next week. So there are some silver linings...

I agree completely about Onegin.  The great Hvorostovsky, that beautiful set, Renee Fleming.   No Mozart is listed for the next few weeks but maybe in April or May.  I saw the  Macbeth, Don Carlo and Norma at the Met with the same casts and all are wonderful. I'm really looking forward to watching them again.

Share this post


Link to post
21 hours ago, vipa said:

I also enjoy a podcast called, Aria Code.

Thanks for mentioning this, vipa! It looks fascinating, I can't wait to listen. 

Share this post


Link to post

I actually did start watching Das Rheingold at around 6 pm Tuesday. I went to the site to see if they were listing next week's operas and it was already up and available to play. 

Share this post


Link to post

What a totally delightful Barber of Seville! (I only watched the first half, the final ensemble of which is one of my favorites in all of opera). I’m not clear how long they are going to keep doing these, does anybody know? Request: Marriage of Figaro, old production, please!

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)

I strongly recommend the Met On Demand subscription for those so inclined. The catalogue is very extensive, particularly if you’re into audio as well as video. I have the app on my Roku TV and use it pretty much daily. I think it’s around $15/month.

Edited by nanushka

Share this post


Link to post

Thanks nanushka. My partner and I are probably going to do that. We’ve been looking forward to the broadcasts almost every night now. 

Share this post


Link to post
7 minutes ago, cobweb said:

Thanks nanushka. My partner and I are probably going to do that. We’ve been looking forward to the broadcasts almost every night now. 

Enjoy! I’ve been working my way through the late 80s Ring cycle on video about a scene per night over the last month and really finding it very diverting.

Share this post


Link to post

I have been enjoying the Met's rebroadcasts immensely. (I've even gotten my mother into them! Her favorites have been Puccini's operas and old broadcasts like "Aida" and "Marriage of Figaro.")  I have always liked opera but these streamings have turned me into a big fan, introducing new works and old favorites. Highlights for me have been "Eugene Onegin" (so much so that I've viewed four other productions), "La Cenerentola," "Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg," and yesterday's "Turandot."

Yusif Eyvazov was the gentlest, most calm Prince Calaf I'd ever seen. He was not magnetic like other portrayals of the role I was used to. He had a quiet strength about him, looking neither to the left or right in his quest to win Turandot. He saw something in the princess that made her worth loving. 

Christine Goerke's Turandot was no man-hater. Her iciness  was an illusion. From her entrance in Act II through the end of the Riddle scene, this Turandot was protecting herself, afraid of vulnerability and love. She had been in this familiar situation, presenting her riddles to  countless suitors before. But  Calaf was not like the others. Christine's body language and facial expressions conveyed her being torn between her attraction to him and desire for him to fail. This added weight to her confession in Act III about her conflicting feelings, seeing his certainty to conquer her -- we had seen it. Instead of Liu's sacrifice being the turning point, of truly awakening Turandot's love for Calaf, it had been growing since they first faced off in the great throne room.

But the connection between the two dated even further back. In the closing moments of Act I, after striking the gong, Calaf held his hand out to Turandot. Slowly she looked at him, raised her hand, palm up and held away from her body: stop, stay away. Several times the moment was repeated between them, with him longingly reaching and she fearfully pushing away. Then the end, after Turandot called him Love;  this time she extended her hand, palm open, accepting and inviting. And Calaf came to her.

The rest of the cast was wonderful. The orchestra magnificent.  Zeffirelli’s production is still stunning after all this time. 

P.S. Thank you, vipa, for the Aria Code recommendation! The podcast has been fascinating!

Share this post


Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...