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The Traveling Ballerina

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Affects the Ballet World

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1 hour ago, YouOverThere said:

My favorite is Master Chang's Tiger Den Martial Arts and Ballet

So, of course I had to google them. I watched their little video, which promises "Strength, Discipline, Agility, Friendship" — that and a wall of mirrors would seem to accommodate both a dojo and a ballet studio. Alas, there's no ballet in evidence on their website.

 

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Posted (edited)

It seems to me that the media (and related group think) are doing what they do during epidemics-- make a "news story" out of people who are infected.  This further stigmatizes the illness.  I find that really damaging to the ballet world.

It's kind of sad that the chief critici for WaPo can only think to drone on and on about Julie Kent. Clearly a slow news year in dance. 

Furthermore, people in all walks of life, in all professions have contracted this disease and dance is no different. If we dramatize and decide that the standard in dance is no dancers infected ever, then we really do endanger the future of dance with group think. Acknowledge the risks, give dancers some choices about their return, and then let "Early adopters" move forward. 

Other sports are doing so. 

The purpose of controlling this spread is to prevent hospitals from becoming overwhelmed. As a group, dancers are pretty healthy.  Few are morbidly obese, few are hypertensive, few have respitatory issues (though this might be a higher risk.)

And, if you are going to mention that study in South Korea about dancers, do remember that it was 37 dancers (a very small sample in my field) and that, when distanced the risk was not high. 

 

 

Edited by balletforme

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, balletforme said:

It seems to me that the media (and related group think) are doing what they do during epidemics-- make a "news story" out of people who are infected.  This further stigmatizes the illness.

Moe than forty thousand people in Britain have died of the virus, what do you expect the media to do?  Brush the story under the carpet?  There is no stigma attached to illness.  In the beginning it was bad luck if you caught it, being in the wrong place at the wrong time.  Now it can be avoided by social distancing and wearing PPE - to catch it now is an own goal.

Frankly right now I'm more concerned about the consequences of the national debt and mass unemployment than when or even if I can watch ballet again.

Edited by Mashinka
typo

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Posted (edited)

And, well, ballet dancers are part of that group of mass unemployed people?  Right?  They are actually people. While they make it possible for audiences to watch ballet, they, themselves, are also suffering from unemployment.  

Edited by balletforme

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5 hours ago, Mashinka said:

There is no stigma attached to illness. 

reads to me to be the opposite of 

5 hours ago, Mashinka said:

to catch it now is an own goal.

The current science talks about prolonged and cumulative exposure, mostly indoors, to be the great risk, and while PPE is great;u effective, like condoms, are not 100% effective.  Those who are considered "essential workers" are at risk, whether or not they can social distance.

48 minutes ago, balletforme said:

And, well, ballet dancers are part of that group of mass unemployed people?  Right?

A very tiny percentage of those who are unemployed.  If you put al performers who make a living from it together, they are still a tiny percentage of those who are unemployed.  That doesn't make it any less painful for performers, but their plight alone is not going to drive social policy.  The pressure is less from them than from audience.

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6 hours ago, Helene said:

A very tiny percentage of those who are unemployed.  If you put al performers who make a living from it together, they are still a tiny percentage of those who are unemployed.  That doesn't make it any less painful for performers, but their plight alone is not going to drive social policy.  The pressure is less from them than from audience.

Coincidentally, I ran into this posting by Tavi Gevinson concerning Arts and Culture contributions to the US economy (forward past the 1st image to see the stats)
 

 

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1 minute ago, pherank said:

Coincidentally, I ran into this posting by Tavi Gevinson concerning Arts and Culture contributions to the US economy (forward past the 1st image to see the stats)

Audience.

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United Kingdom

“Indoor live performances will be able to resume from August 1 with a socially distanced audience, the government has said.”

 

https://www.thestage.co.uk/news/indoor-live-performance-to-resume-from-august-1

(thanks to Jan McNulty at BalletcoForum)

The United Kingdom seems to be the most assertively determined nation, in relation to reviving the arts, that my  limited viewing has noticed. I wish it much success.

My daughter who follows all this very closely is convinced that the use of face masks is the key to getting on top of it.

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16 hours ago, Buddy said:

My daughter who follows all this very closely is convinced that the use of face masks is the key to getting on top of it.

I think she's right.  As an asthmatic I once had to seek emergency treatment in Spain after catching a mere cold, as a consequence I'm obsessive about hand washing but it's never prevented me from catching things.  If someone coughs or sneezes close to you, particularly if they don't put a hand in front their face, you will catch all manner of things.  Masks are definitely the way to go.

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Face masks are part of the social contract in Japan and have been long before COVID-19.   People who are even mildly symptomatic wear masks to protect the people around them.

Championships can start with (open) practices between 6-7am and last through medal ceremonies ending near 11pm.  They run from Wednesday through Saturday night or Sunday afternoon, often with practices the day before -- and when they had qualification rounds, practices started on Sunday with the competition Monday morning, plus there's always the gala on Sunday.  And fans from Japan wear masks for the duration.

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19 hours ago, The Traveling Ballerina said:

La Compañía Nacional de Danza is actually performing next week in Granada and the week after in Madrid. 

The Mariinsky has a matinee and evening gala on Sunday 7/19/20.  I saw various dancers had posted rehearsal pictures on Instagram.   https://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/playbill/2020/7/19/2_1400/

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22 hours ago, Buddy said:

The United Kingdom seems to be the most assertively determined nation, in relation to reviving the arts, that my  limited viewing has noticed. I wish it much success.

There had been news of many job losses in the theatre world in UK these couple of days in spite of the government emergency packages,  Such as The Royal Opera House laying off all their entire casual staff (including stage technicians and wardrobe staff) Such a sad situation.

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/jul/17/royal-opera-house-lays-off-entire-team-casual-staff-coronavirus

Quote

The Royal Opera House has cut its entire team of casual staff, as pressure mounts for the UK government’s emergency arts fund to be quickly rolled out after an estimated 3,000 job losses in the sector.

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, maps said:

The Mariinsky has a matinee and evening gala on Sunday 7/19/20.  I saw various dancers had posted rehearsal pictures on Instagram.   https://www.mariinsky.ru/en/playbill/playbill/2020/7/19/2_1400/

Thanks, Maps. 

I've posted performances and casts through February at “Companies/Organizations with Specific Plans for Reopening”. The Mariinsky II and the much smaller Concert Hall are being used for July with seating being every other seat.

https://balletalert.invisionzone.com/topic/45700-companiesorganizations-with-specific-plans-for-reopening/?tab=comments#comment-428530

 

Edited by Buddy

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Posted (edited)

London gives it a go.

" 'We are not a risk': London Palladium hosts an audience for live performance safety trial "

“Beverley Knight – who Lloyd Webber thanked for being brave – then performed an hour-plus set, the first time anyone has performed on a London stage to a live audience since March.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/theatre/london-palladium-safety-trials-andrew-lloyd-webber-beverley-knight-a4506961.html

(thanks to Ian Macmillan at BalletcoForum)

 

 

 

Edited by Buddy

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Posted (edited)

"There’s No Social Distancing for Dancers. How Can the Show Go On?"

The New York Times

"They talk about testing. Daily testing....Apart from a vaccine, daily testing — from home, before leaving for the studio — seems like the only feasible solution for safe rehearsal. Even though paper-strip tests are less sensitive than nasal swab tests, their speed and ease would be a game changer.

"But before any consistent testing happens — and how long will that be? — there is an opportunity for dance to morph into something else as it finds a life off the stage."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/24/arts/dance/safety-protocols-dance-coronavirus.html

 

“Miami City Ballet is transforming an empty Lincoln Road store into a pop-up theater”

https://www.timeout.com/miami/news/miami-city-ballet-is-transforming-an-empty-lincoln-road-store-into-a-pop-up-theater-072420

 

(Thanks to Ian Macmillan at BalletcoForum for these)

Edited by Buddy

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From the United Kingdom….

“….the Prime Minister announced that indoor shows for socially distanced live audiences are allowed from August.”

“We [Birmingham Royal Ballet] have created a 'safe back to work' plan for the dancers based on the process tested by professional sports.”

This is from an announcement sent out by the Birmingham Royal Ballet.

(Thanks to Alison at BalletcoForum)

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On 7/25/2020 at 5:42 PM, Buddy said:

"They talk about testing. Daily testing....Apart from a vaccine, daily testing — from home, before leaving for the studio — seems like the only feasible solution for safe rehearsal. Even though paper-strip tests are less sensitive than nasal swab tests, their speed and ease would be a game changer."

A  group in Israel has developed a breathalyzer test that gives results in about half a minute, and they're hoping to have it mass produced in India. However, they're only claiming "better than 90 percent accuracy", which might not be accurate enough for people who work very close together.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, YouOverThere said:

A  group in Israel has developed a breathalyzer test that gives results in about half a minute, and they're hoping to have it mass produced in India. However, they're only claiming "better than 90 percent accuracy", which might not be accurate enough for people who work very close together.

There's no 100% effective in our world. Compare that statistic with this one:

"But it’s another Chinese vaccine that’s more interesting … in an “almost certainly less effective” way...While Phase 1/2 trial results on Moderna, Pfizer, and Oxford vaccines showed over 90% of people developing high levels of neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 proteins, with CanSino that number was just 59%. Meaning that almost half the people might not be getting any real immunity from the vaccine. The overall level of antibody production also appears to be significantly lower than that seen with other leading vaccines." --Mark Sumner, Daily Kos

[CanSino is being developed in conjunction with China’s Central Military Commission, which has already approved the vaccine for use in the armed forces]

Edited by pherank

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Here are some excerpts from an article (in russian, Google translation) in Tass about how the Mariinsky reopening is happening.

“The theater was empty, because only the soloists were rehearsing. At first there were two people in the hall, it was a condition of the Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare. Then they began to add one more person to the class, and three artists, a teacher and a pianist met in the hall, "says the prima ballerina of the Mariinsky Theater, People's Artist of Russia Viktoria Tereshkina." We come to the theater - they take our temperature, after each lesson in the hall is disinfected, the floors, machines are washed, disinfected with an ultraviolet lamp, only then you can enter the hall and rehearse. "

The announcement of the first concert after the quarantine, even a few weeks after returning to rehearsals, came as a surprise to the artists.

"We didn’t believe in it until the last. It was so amazing to go on stage, and to be honest, there was little time for preparation. It's one thing to do a lesson and quite another to rehearse and dance (on stage - TASS comment). But we survived. this is a test, and now such a practice has developed, in principle, very convenient for us: every weekend we go on stage, "Tereshkina said.

Everyone's [audience] temperature is measured and the presence of protective equipment is checked. If the mask was not with you, it will be given out at the entrance.

There are no intermissions yet.

The auditorium has an unusually large number of empty seats: everyone sits in a checkerboard pattern - from the stalls to the upper tier. You cannot change, and the attendants are closely watching this. In general, according to employees, the audience is quite responsible about visiting the theater in the new conditions and trying to maintain discipline.

The performances themselves are not going on as before. The distance is kept not only by the audience, but also, for example, by musicians, therefore the orchestra is presented in a reduced composition. It is the same on stage: in some mise-en-scènes that involve a large number of artists involved, their number is now also smaller.

https://tass.ru/kultura/9043453

(Thanks to Elena C at Balletfriends)

To translate you can use this.

https://translate.google.com

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30 minutes ago, Buddy said:

The auditorium has an unusually large number of empty seats: everyone sits in a checkerboard pattern - from the stalls to the upper tier. You cannot change, and the attendants are closely watching this. In general, according to employees, the audience is quite responsible about visiting the theater in the new conditions and trying to maintain discipline.

The arrangements make sense from an healthcare point of view, but this would certainly make for an even greater revenue loss for North American companies to discontinue intermission periods. Not to mention no restroom break.  ;)
I wonder if the performance times are shorter too?

Temperature checks are a very imperfect means of virus control, so it's good that everyone on the premises is being forced to wear a mask.

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21 minutes ago, pherank said:

Not to mention no restroom break.  😉

In deference to Wagner's intentions and in defiance of human biology, The Metropolitan Opera stages Die Fliegende Hollander and Das Rheingold without intermissions. (The operas are each about two-and-one-half hours long.) Lots of critics and scholars have tried to justify this on the theory that the resulting continuity from beginning to end is a better musical and theatrical experience. Of course, it's a pretty lousy musical and theatrical experience when one's bladder or one's back—or both—are clamoring for your immediate attention RIGHT NOW barely two-thirds of the way through, and this has apparently never occurred to the opera powers that be.

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