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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Affects the Ballet World


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4 minutes ago, California said:

Same question! I'm not finding it.

 

I've checked the YouTube channel and Facebook page and I don't see it in either place.

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14 minutes ago, nanushka said:

I'm curious how exactly the pressure arising from that decision might play out — in the cases of arts audiences in particular.

I'm also not so sure public opinion is actually as far ahead as some politicians and protesting citizens on the push for life to "get back to the way it was." Certainly there's beginning to be more of a push; but there are a lot of potential stages between where we are now and "the way it was."

"Stages" are for authorities and bureaucrats.  ;)

My observations of the "Teen through 40 Years of Age" crowd is that they are ready and willing to get on with things, and are basically doing that.

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Just now, FPF said:

I've checked the YouTube channel and Facebook page and I don't see it in either place.

That's a shame, but hopefully they are just rescheduling out of respect for this week of organized protests.

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3 minutes ago, pherank said:

"Stages" are for authorities and bureaucrats.  😉

I guess. But also, potentially, for those who are analyzing societal shifts (if their social theories don't prohibit describing change in stages).

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Posted (edited)

I think that Lincoln Center Dance Week is largely being "Blackedout."  Good thing. 

This may interest some: https://www.aclu.org/news/privacy-technology/coronavirus-immunity-passports-are-not-the-answer/T

The US is this crazy, crazy country built on the notion of freedom and that has both benefits and costs. But, on balance, at least for me, the benefits far outweigh the costs. I can weigh risks and benefits myself and don't need the government to figure that out for me. I am a free adult. 

Edited by balletforme
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Every day I've been reading a new 2020-21 season announcement coming from Europe.  

Edited to add:  Seattle Opera just moved out its Songs of Summer Recital from tomorrow night to later (TBD).

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1 hour ago, nanushka said:

I guess. But also, potentially, for those who are analyzing societal shifts (if their social theories don't prohibit describing change in stages).

I'm just making a joke, of course, and I'm OK with anyone trying to make sense of it all. But the people in the street (literally in the street right now) are all making their own choices, and I would say compliance with regulations has not been foremost in people's minds. In my part of the world, the rush to get back outdoors, and drive around the county or even the city has overshadowed everything, except for maybe the marches (and fires/looting). And even those haven't stopped people from reopening businesses or just going to the beach again. The stages were simply a failure where I live, because so much anger and stress had built up that officials were getting constant flak. Things just had to change or widespread civil unrest was coming fast. I think that's a big reason why the George Floyd tragedy seemed to explode instantaneously all across the nation - people were already at the bursting point, and it only took a single, horrific event to ignite things.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, pherank said:

I'm just making a joke, of course, and I'm OK with anyone trying to make sense of it all. But the people in the street (literally in the street right now) are all making their own choices, and I would say compliance with regulations has not been foremost in people's minds. In my part of the world, the rush to get back outdoors, and drive around the county or even the city has overshadowed everything, except for maybe the marches (and fires/looting). And even those haven't stopped people from reopening businesses or just going to the beach again. The stages were simply a failure where I live, because so much anger and stress had built up that officials were getting constant flak. Things just had to change or widespread civil unrest was coming fast. I think that's a big reason why the George Floyd tragedy seemed to explode instantaneously all across the nation - people were already at the bursting point, and it only took a single, horrific event to ignite things.

I'm not talking about regulations, though. (Perhaps my use of the word "stages" has been confusing; I was not referring to, e.g., the CDC's "stages" or "phases" of reopening.) I'm talking about (non-anecdotal) patterns of social behavior and of broad institutional and industry-wide (in the arts — and most specifically at the Met) adaptations — and about what's likely to happen with those as all things continue to develop over the next 6-12 months, not about what's happened with them over the past 4-8 weeks.

Edited by nanushka
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Posted (edited)

I hadn't actually read the AP's article on the Met's plans, but now that I have I see that Peter Gelb offers quite a significant qualification:

Quote

“Based upon the discussions I’ve had with various health authorities here locally in New York, some of them believe that there will be a medical solution by then. If there isn’t, we won’t open. But if we didn’t open on Dec. 31, it would not be mean that we wouldn’t open at all next season.”

This is much more in line with what I think is actually feasible and realistic: live performances (of opera at the Met, at least) are likely dependent on significantly better treatment options than now exist.

More on why:

Quote

“Social distancing and grand opera do not mix,” Met general manager Peter Gelb said. “It is impossible to follow these social distancing guidelines that are in effect and presumably will be in effect certainly through the summer and into the early fall to have an orchestra situated in the pit, to have a chorus and dancers and singers in close contact with each other on the stage, to have costume, wardrobe, makeup people working intensely.”

 

Edited by nanushka
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Posted (edited)

The Vienna State Opera is once again performing for small, physically distanced audiences. Yesterday, Günther Groissböck gave a solo recital at the theater, and today the theater's ensemble members performed selections from Mozart operas, with piano accompaniment, of course. The audiences were understandably enthusiastic.

Last week the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra streamed its first post-lockdown performance, albeit without an audience.

 

 

Edited by volcanohunter
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I saw the Groissbock concert, and while I saw distancing, was surprised not to see a fully masked audience.  I don't know how they managed getting people in and out of the theater.

He was wonderful, and I'm glad he sang Wotan's Farewell as an encore, given that his debut at Bayreuth has been postponed.

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5 hours ago, Helene said:

I don't know how they managed getting people in and out of the theater.

I imagine getting them out would be more of an issue. For example, when the ensemble took their final bows together, and there were some 20 people on stage, spacing the singers out was not really a problem. But when they exited the stage, there was some bottlenecking. 

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I noticed that two of the men defaulted to letting-the-women-exit-first behavior when they tried to leave through the stage right wings.  It's so ingrained.

At the end of the concert, it look liked people just got up and walked toward the aisle like they always did.  They weren't tring to orchestrate a row-by-row exit through different doors, as far as I could see.

The acoustics with so few must be very similar to what's it's like to audition in a hall like that.  

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Part of the problem was that the performance wasn't taking place on the stage proper, but on top of the orchestra pit. The only way to reach it is via steep, narrow stairs on either side, and I'm sure it isn't easy to negotiate them in a gown and heels.

No bar service and no intermission are givens. What if it had been raining and the audience had come in full rain gear? What happens when the weather turns colder and everyone is wearing a coat? In my experience, apart from the hall itself, the post-show cloak room is the most crowded portion of the evening. Will Europeans now sit on their outerwear like Americans?

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If they continue social distancing, each piece of outerwear will have it's own seat, but those seats aren't used to rain gear.  (In Seattle, most people's rain gear that isn't checked rolls up into a ball and gets shoved under the seat.)

I can't tell if they sold seats to this, and/or if most of the audience was (mostly) people who worked for the theater and others in the Ensemble, so that they could iron out the logistics.  It was so 

I was blown away by some of the singing.  Having watched so many of their offerings, there were a lot of familiar names. I would pay $$$ for tickets to see that core four plus the Ensemble Despina in a production of Cosi, and happily.

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Judging by posts by one of the participants, it was a paying audience (€36), but only 100 tickets were made available. I noticed Dominique Meyer took a box seat.

I agree about the quality of the singing! During these past 3 months of streams, I've been consistently happiest with the singing out of Vienna. I'm glad the concert was called "Un'aura amorosa" because of how Josh Lovell, a first-year ensemble member from Canada, sang it. Oh my!

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My jaw is still on the floor after hearing Lovell :flowers:.

Edited to add:  What is in the water in British Columbia?  First Ben Heppner, now Lovell...

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Washington Performing Arts has created a series of PPV online performances (tapes of concerts they've presented in the recent past). For 2021. It appears that they aren't convinced that a 2020-21 season will take place.

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2 hours ago, YouOverThere said:

Washington Performing Arts has created a series of PPV online performances (tapes of concerts they've presented in the recent past). For 2021. It appears that they aren't convinced that a 2020-21 season will take place.

Oops, I misread the announcement. These apparently will be new performances (the Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez is the only dance company).

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Germany must be doing something right if three theaters expect to open in August!

Here's their calendar: https://www.staatsballett-berlin.de/en/spielplan/18-6-2020/kalender

from Twitter:

After weeks of planning, we can finally announce an updated version of our 20/21 season! In Aug and Sep, we'll be back on stages of the Deutsche Oper Berlin, the Komische Oper Berlin and the Staatsoper Unter den Linden! We're looking forward to seeing you! http://staatsballett-berlin.de

 
 
 
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Edited by California
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