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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Affects the Ballet World


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1 hour ago, Leah said:

La Scala will reopen in September with Verdi’s Requiem to honor Covid victims. If the rest of the world is assumed to be a couple months behind Italy there may be hope for Nutcrackers yet.

But of course no use of the future tense these days can really be read without an implied "we hope."

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I just noticed on the Koch Theater website that a theatrical production (Notre Dame de Paris)  scheduled for September 2020 is postponed to July of 2022.  That's not a typo. 2022.   I'm assuming the reason they have not posted any info on cancellation of PNB at the Koch for June 2020 is that all involved parties are searching for a way to reschedule the engagement if possible before making any announcement.  The fact that we now have confirmation that a September 2020 engagement is not moving forward seems to be further confirmation that there probably will not be a fall season of ballet at NYCB in Sept/Oct 2020.

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I wonder if NYCB is planning on delaying their season announcement (which will likely not include a fall season) until after May 31, the deadline for refunds. I was planning on using the credit for the next subscription, but I don’t know when that will even happen.

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Ballet West just cancelled its end-of-season program slot and may reschedule the Bolero program during the 20/21 season  The press release:

BALLET WEST POSTPONES BOLERO PROGRAM  

Season subscriptions remain on sale for 20/21 

SALT LAKE CITY, UT--Ballet West has received notice from Salt Lake County’s Department of Arts & Culture that the Janet Quinney Lawson Capitol Theater will remain closed through June 30. Following this directive, the Company has no choice but to postpone Bolero and The Dream, scheduled for June 12-20.

Company officials are considering the availability of Capitol Theater to reschedule this program during the upcoming 20/21 season. In the coming weeks, ticket holders will be notified of rescheduled dates, or ticketing options.

“As with every performing arts organizations, Ballet West is accessing future plans on a day-to-day basis. Our main interest as we navigate these unprecedented times are with the health and safety of our staff and our patrons,” said Executive Director Michael Scolamiero. “We all look forward to returning to the theater again soon and enjoying art--together.”

 

In a positive sign that patrons are excited to return to the theater, season subscription sales for next year remain robust. Programming for the 20/21 season includes Utah premieres, reconstructions, and classic favorites like The Nutcracker, Dracula, and Romeo and Juliet. Single tickets do not go on sale until September, so patrons are encouraged to subscribe now or renew their season now. Four-show packages begin at just $84. Contact Ballet West at 801-869-6920, or visit

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Washington Ballet is postponing its Swan Lake to May 6-16, 2021 and making other changes (yet to be announced) to the 20-21 season:

Swan Lake Update
 
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Adelaide Clauss by Procopio Photography

Swan Lake Postponed Until May 2021
As our world navigates this unprecedented global emergency, The Washington Ballet and the entire global arts community are facing extraordinary challenges. We are so eager to celebrate with you the beauty and humanity that is revealed so exquisitely through our art form, however, maintaining the health and safety of our artists, staff, and community is of the utmost importance. Due to the governmental stay-at-home orders and CDC guidelines, The Washington Ballet has had to postpone the June 2020 production of Swan Lake. Swan Lake will now close the 2020/21 Season on May 6-16, 2021. We are disappointed that we are unable to share the beauty of Julie Kent and Victor Barbee’s Swan Lake with you this year, but are looking forward to celebrating a two-week run next season at the Kennedy Center.

Changes to the upcoming 2020/21 Season
These unparalleled circumstances have necessitated a revision to our originally planned 2020/21 Season.
 We are working to optimize the upcoming season to create the safest and most joyful collection and schedule of performances. We will share these changes with you soon; as we navigate this new world, we deeply appreciate your support and patience.
 
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Swan Lake Information for Season Ticket Holders
We are so grateful for your outpouring of support, messages of encouragement, and enthusiasm to renew for our 2020/21 Season of JOY. We want to make the transfer of Swan Lake tickets and season renewal process as easy as possible for our Season Ticket Holders. Please see the below, and email tickets@washingtonballet.org with any questions.

2019/20 Season Ticket Holders who have already renewed for the 2020/21 Season:
Swan Lake will replace Cinderella as the season-closing production. Therefore, If you have already renewed for the 2020/21 season, you now have an extra ticket on your account. We will be reaching out to you in the next few weeks with options to donate, upgrade, exchange, or refund. 

2019/20 Season Ticket Holders who have not yet renewed for 2020/21 Season:
Your 2019/20 Swan Lake tickets have automatically been moved to the new production dates, and your 2020/21 Season Ticket Package now has a reduced price. 
If you have yet to renew your Season Ticket Package for the 2020/21 season, simply email tickets@washingtonballet.org and request an updated, reduced renewal rate and we will help you process your renewal. Alternatively, you may still complete the form you received in the mail and we will reach out to you with an updated, reduced rate before processing your transaction.


As a Season Ticket Holder of The Washington Ballet, you get to experience all the magic of the ballet with a variety of perks, including complimentary Nutcracker tickets, retaining your seat season after season, and more. Know that when you purchase a Season Ticket Package with The Washington Ballet, you are buying with confidence. We understand that flexibility and your safety are key during this uncertain time, and that’s why with every season ticket purchase, we guarantee your ability to credit your purchase towards any future The Washington Ballet performance, donate your tickets to our nonprofit cause, or receive a full refund.
 
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Swan Lake Single Ticket Holders (tickets purchased through the Kennedy Center)
For those who purchased tickets to our April 9-19, 2020 production of Swan Lake, your tickets will automatically be migrated to the May 6-16, 2021 production dates – for the same day of the week and time in the same seats. 
All patrons choosing to retain their tickets for Swan Lake will receive their new tickets this Fall. If you wish to exchange your ticket for a different show, switch to another Washington Ballet performance at the Kennedy Center, receive a credit for a future Washington Ballet performance, or request a refund, please contact the Kennedy Center Advance Sales Box Office at 202-416-8540 between 10:00AM and 5:00PM Monday-Friday, or email BoxOffice-AdvanceSales@kennedy-Center.org.
 
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Thank You for Your Support and Patience
It is during the difficult times that we are reminded of our shared humanity, the need to care for one another, and the beauty of art that invaluably adds to our lives. Stay safe and healthy, and we can’t wait to be together again and celebrate the beauty, athleticism, and artistry of The Washington Ballet.
 
 
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The Washington Ballet is funded in part by the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities, 
an agency supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.
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Due to COVID-19, the rest of The Washington Ballet's season, including next month's Swan Lake at the Kennedy Center, is now cancelled. Already postponed once, the Swan Lake is now rescheduled to end the 2020/2021 season, in mid-May 2021. Source: TWB's Facebook page.

 

edit - I see that California beat me to it. Sorry!

Edited by Roberta
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Les Misérables has rescheduled their US tour and is now due at Segerstrom in October. It seems awfully optimistic to me, but I would be so thrilled if everyone could safely get back to work this fall. 

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Guest Lucinda
On 4/28/2020 at 1:05 PM, abatt said:

I just noticed on the Koch Theater website that a theatrical production (Notre Dame de Paris)  scheduled for September 2020 is postponed to July of 2022.  That's not a typo. 2022.   I'm assuming the reason they have not posted any info on cancellation of PNB at the Koch for June 2020 is that all involved parties are searching for a way to reschedule the engagement if possible before making any announcement.  The fact that we now have confirmation that a September 2020 engagement is not moving forward seems to be further confirmation that there probably will not be a fall season of ballet at NYCB in Sept/Oct 2020.

This seems excessive. Even without a vaccine, the cases are naturally declining at this point. Do they really anticipate not being able to resume in the fall? 

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16 minutes ago, Guest Lucinda said:

This seems excessive. Even without a vaccine, the cases are naturally declining at this point. Do they really anticipate not being able to resume in the fall? 

Here's why everyone is being so conservative on reopening:

Since this is a brand new to humans virus, epidemiologists must look back at how similar viruses behaved to predict its behavior - that would be the SARS and MERS viruses. But they also pay a lot of attention to the scary 1918 Spanish Flu (influenza) pandemic. The influenza-type viruses tend to have at least 2 distinct waves of outbreak.

From the CDC website regarding the 1918 Spanish Flu:
"There were 3 different waves of illness during the pandemic, starting in March 1918 and subsiding by summer of  1919. The pandemic peaked in the U.S. during the second wave, in the fall of 1918. This highly fatal second wave was responsible for most of the U.S. deaths attributed to the pandemic.
A third wave of illness occurred during the winter and spring of 1919, adding to the pandemic death toll. The third wave of the pandemic subsided during the summer of 1919."

Something like 2 million people worldwide died in the first wave of the Spanish Flu pandemic. And at least 22 million died in the 2nd wave. Thus the nervousness of the medical professionals. Fortunately, we know far more about Covid-19 than medical professionals understood about the Spanish Flu/influenza outbreak. They didn't even know they were dealing with something we now call a "virus". And that was understandable because until the invention of the electron microscope, a virus had never even been seen.

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I would also note that Notre Dame is touring from France. It’s one thing for a domestic company to perform in the fall and quite another for a group from overseas—they would probably have to quarantine for a couple weeks, etc.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Guest Lucinda said:

This seems excessive. Even without a vaccine, the cases are naturally declining at this point. Do they really anticipate not being able to resume in the fall? 

The cases are declining because we’ve all been staying home. Until there is widespread testing and contact tracing, large public gatherings will likely not be feasible (unless a quite effective treatment is developed). So yes, I think they do anticipate just that.

Edited by nanushka
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Fauci seems genuinely convinced by the test results of the new vaccine. Let's see what happens and hope for the best.

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Posted (edited)
1 minute ago, Buddy said:

Fauci seems genuinely convinced by the test results of the new vaccine. Let's see what happens and hope for the best.

He said by January. Companies will need to reconvene for rehearsals and getting back into performance shape before they can actually perform.

Edited by nanushka
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3 minutes ago, nanushka said:

He said by January. Companies will need to reconvene for rehearsals and getting back into performance shape before they can actually perform.

There might be plenty of it developed before January. I'm not suggesting any timetable, just trying to be hopeful for an earlier, possibly much earlier than expected, recovery.

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1 minute ago, Buddy said:

There might be plenty of it developed before January. I'm not suggesting any timetable, just trying to be hopeful for an earlier, possibly much earlier than expected, recovery.

My point is that it’s not “excessive” to think otherwise, as was suggested above. One can of course hope for whatever one thinks is reasonable to hope for.

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14 minutes ago, Buddy said:

The article you've linked to refers to a promising anti-viral, remdesivir, not a vaccine. Still good news, of course, since the drug shortened hospital stays by a few days for the patients who received it as opposed to the placebo. 

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7 minutes ago, Kathleen O'Connell said:

The article you've linked to refers to a promising anti-viral, remdesivir, not a vaccine. Still good news, of course, since the drug shortened hospital stays by a few days for the patients who received it as opposed to the placebo. 

Then here he does say this, Kathleen.

“Asked if he thinks developing hundreds of millions of doses of a vaccine is doable by January, Fauci said, "Yeah, I do, Savannah.””

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2020/04/30/fauci-warns-reopening-states-you-cant-just-leap-over-things/24154216/

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5 minutes ago, Kathleen O'Connell said:

The article you've linked to refers to a promising anti-viral, remdesivir, not a vaccine. Still good news, of course, since the drug shortened hospital stays by a few days for the patients who received it as opposed to the placebo. 

It’s great news, I agree. I don’t think this means it’s at all likely that large theaters in NYC could be hosting performing arts companies ready to perform in September, though.

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11 minutes ago, nanushka said:

It’s great news, I agree. I don’t think this means it’s at all likely that large theaters in NYC could be hosting performing arts companies ready to perform in September, though.

Agreed. And not to be depressing, but I don't think a successful vaccine has ever been developed in under 18 months. Yet.

'Considering the history and science behind making these drugs, “a year to 18 months would be absolutely unprecedented,” one expert warns.'

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, pherank said:

Agreed. And not to be depressing, but I don't think a successful vaccine has ever been developed in under 18 months. Yet.

'Considering the history and science behind making these drugs, “a year to 18 months would be absolutely unprecedented,” one expert warns.'

Yes, and beyond development, manufacture in quantities of hundreds of millions (we don’t know how many doses will be needed) is well beyond our current capacities. Much will have to change before that’s even feasible.

Edited by nanushka
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One of the plans this time is to manufacture in parallel with testing, and if it works, fine, and if not, the vaccines won't be used.

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2 minutes ago, Helene said:

One of the plans this time is to manufacture in parallel with testing, and if it works, fine, and if not, the vaccines won't be used.

It’s definitely a situation where such disregard for potential waste is well worth the risk.

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