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In my favorite moment, Angelique's terrified minion was trying to tell someone else who the witch was.  When he tried to speak, the witch caused him to choke, so he wrote the initial in the dust.  He made a "V", and the witness said "'V' for Victoria." (This may have been the Friday cliffhanger.). Then the minion put in the crossbar, and the witness exclaimed, "'A' for Angelique!!!"

Or at least that's the way I remember it.

 

I loved my mother's soaps, too.

 

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16 hours ago, dirac said:

It also attracted a different and younger audience from other soaps – kids could watch it when they came home from school, as you did. Eventually the plotlines got too far out for the show’s own good and also daytime advertisers realized that DS wasn’t helping them sell much laundry detergent. It was syndicated after its initial run ended, which likely saved the tapes from destruction by the network – many recordings of the soaps from that era have not survived.

What made Dark Shadows a pop culture sensation -- it's teenage and early twentysomething audience -- is also what killed it (haha - pun intended!). dirac is exactly right that the audience Dark Shadows had wasn't the audience advertisers were trying to reach. Advertisers of that era were trying to reach women who were at home during the daytime and were making the purchasing decisions for the home. (This was long before the all-important demos encompassing ages 16-24 had come into being.) The irony of it is that a show which had the kind of audience Dark Shadows had 50 years ago would run forever today.

Dark Shadows was very fortunate because producer Dan Curtis saw the value in maintaining the masters. It's possible to watch the entire run of the show, which is not the case for most other soaps of that era. For instance, ABC debuted All My Children in 1970 but didn't start preserving the masters until the mid-70s. So it's impossible to see much of a young Susan Lucci during her formative years on the show because very few episodes have survived. (Dark Shadows, in contrast, moved to network syndication, then to cable television, then to VHS, then to DVD and now to on-demand.)

One more thing: Dark Shadows died a quick death (in soap opera terms) because it became very repetitive. In 1968, the show had the ghosts of Quentin Collins and Beth Chavez possess the children, David Collins and Amy Jennings. In summer 1970, the ghosts of Gerard Stiles and Daphne Harridge (played by a very young Kate Jackson) possessed the children, David Collins and Hallie Stokes. It was the exact same story just with some name changes!

Edited by miliosr

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51 minutes ago, miliosr said:

What made Dark Shadows a pop culture sensation -- it's teenage and early twentysomething audience -- is also what killed it (haha - pun intended!). dirac is exactly right that the audience Dark Shadows had wasn't the audience advertisers were trying to reach. Advertisers of that era were trying to reach women who were at home during the daytime and were making the purchasing decisions for the home. (This was long before the all-important demos encompassing ages 16-24 had come into being.) The irony of it is that a show which today had the kind of audience Dark Shadows had 50 years ago would run forever.

Absolutely.  Buffy the Vampire Slayer reminded me of DS in an odd way, and look at the traction it had.

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I just watched Coco on Netflix. I'm not sure what a child would get from it, but I found the ending very moving. 

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My daughter and I loved Coco -- she's in her 20s, so maybe not a good gauge of the child audience, but we saw a lot of kids there and they seemed receptive.

 

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I was hoping TCM would show Berserk, but not this time. Happy Halloween, y'all:

 

 

dark-shadows-barnabas-collins-jonathan-frid.jpg

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On 10/29/2019 at 5:18 PM, miliosr said:

The introduction of Barnabas in spring 1967 and Julia in summer 1967 definitely saved the show, which had been on the road to cancellation. But I do like the look and atmosphere of the pre- and early Barnabas episodes. You really did feel like you had been transported to this rambling mansion perched above the perpetually storm-tossed fishing village of Collinsport.

I adore Grayson Hall but she would be a strong contender for the title of 'Most Theatrical New York Actress Ever,' especially for her portrayal of the gypsy, Magda, during the 1897 time travel storyline.

Oh, absolutely. Unfortunately they couldn't find storylines to match.

Hall is probably the most active actress I’ve ever seen. She has muscles in her face I didn’t know were there and boy does she ever use them. She’s awesome.

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On ‎11‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 5:31 PM, dirac said:

Hall is probably the most active actress I’ve ever seen. She has muscles in her face I didn’t know were there and boy does she ever use them. She’s awesome.

I think she pioneered the 'clutch the throat' acting technique.

Here's a sample of how moody Dark Shadows looked in black and white:

I would direct people's attention to the 7:00-10:00 mark where Jonathan Frid (as Barnabas) recounts the death of Josette DuPres in 1795 to the governess Victoria Winters (Alexandra Moltke) and Carolyn Stoddard (Nancy Barrett) in what is now known in Dark Shadows fandom as the 'Josette Soliloquy'. What really adds to Frid's performance is the tremendous job the production staff did in lighting the entire scene. The set-up for Barnabas' speech is that there has been a power failure at Collinwood and the only things lighting the drawing room are candles, the fireplace and the flashes of lightning from the storm raging overhead. The lighting and sound effects work the crew did on this episode is worthy of anything Universal Pictures did with its horror movies of the 30s and 40s.

Edited by miliosr

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Looks like they’re rebooting Dark Shadows  again. At least this time, it looks like it’s a sequel. 
 

https://variety.com/2019/tv/news/dark-shadows-the-cw-1203329640/

CW attempted a reboot in 2004, that never got past the pilot phase.  Jessica Chastain was actually in it, as Carolyn.  It’s been screened at fan conventions and a low quality bootleg is floating around

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x70m1p9

 

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Interesting news, Deflope. Is there anything CW hasn't tried to reboot? :)  I may check it out. With the old series so readily available now in all its cheesy glory I don’t know why they bother, though.

I didn't know about the Chastain version. I will have to check out the clip.

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On 11/9/2019 at 4:34 PM, miliosr said:

I think she pioneered the 'clutch the throat' acting technique.

Here's a sample of how moody Dark Shadows looked in black and white:

I would direct people's attention to the 7:00-10:00 mark where Jonathan Frid (as Barnabas) recounts the death of Josette DuPres in 1795 to the governess Victoria Winters (Alexandra Moltke) and Carolyn Stoddard (Nancy Barrett) in what is now known in Dark Shadows fandom as the 'Josette Soliloquy'. What really adds to Frid's performance is the tremendous job the production staff did in lighting the entire scene. The set-up for Barnabas' speech is that there has been a power failure at Collinwood and the only things lighting the drawing room are candles, the fireplace and the flashes of lightning from the storm raging overhead. The lighting and sound effects work the crew did on this episode is worthy of anything Universal Pictures did with its horror movies of the 30s and 40s.

It is very well done. I also like Frid's canny use of the teleprompter. :)

 

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On ‎11‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 3:28 PM, dirac said:

It is very well done. I also like Frid's canny use of the teleprompter. :)

 

The cast members themselves have said that they were always amazed at how Frid's desperate search for the teleprompter during taping took on a different dimension when the shows actually aired. On the air, Frid forgetting his lines and looking for the teleprompter came across as Barnabas lost in melancholy reverie.

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There was also Joan Bennett's big Wedding Confession where she just seems to give up mid-scene and turns dramatically to look right at the prompter and read. Unsurprising, given that she had had to appear on every show that week (I assume it was a week).

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