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Tuesday, July 9

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A review of the Royal Danish Ballet by Ivy Lin for Bachtrack.

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The whole stage immediately transitions to the Napoli pas de six and Tarantella. The Napoli finale didn't have the impact it usually has for a few reasons. For one, everyone onstage was still in their original costumes, which meant the Kupiñski and Bozinoff were still in their jockey uniforms, Tobias Praetorius was still dressed in the baggy fat suit of the Napoli street singer, so the tight cohesion was lessened. Also, the Joyce is too small of a stage for the flurry allegro dancing that is the Napolifinale. Several times one saw dancers looking downwards to make sure they weren't about to bound right off-stage. There were a few standout dancers. Gundorph and Fransson transitioned seamlessly into a charming Teresina and Gennaro. Astrid Elbo was stunningly beautiful in the adagio variation, Kupiñski in the second male variation. And the Tarantella finale with its banging tambourines and super-fast, joyous dancing is a surefire crowdpleaser.

 

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A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Jane Eyre" by Leigh Witchel for dancelog.nyc.

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There are few things worse than a story ballet that doesn’t make sense, and Marston made sure tell the story clearly. Yet a similar trap awaited her as befell Christopher Wheeldon in “The Winter’s Tale.” She plowed through the plot of “Jane Eyre” so diligently and briskly it felt like a checklist. A dance adaptation of a novel can’t just spool out the story; ballet isn’t a made-for-TV movie. Smaller details need to be removed to streamline the narrative, the relationship between the main characters needs to be developed. But some of that might simply happen by the dancers doing “Jane Eyre” more. Much of the subtext comes from their discoveries in performance.

 

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