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Saturday, January 26

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A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Carrie Seidman in The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

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As someone who has admired much of Graziano’s work in the past, I counted myself among those in a state of eager anticipation for this long-awaited reveal. But alas, high expectations have a way of turning into preconceived resentments. I wanted to find my heart in my throat, as I did with the choreographer’s “Symphony of Sorrows,” or swept away by the ethereal beauty of his “In a State of Weightlessness.” Maybe that’s why I was ultimately disappointed by a piece that is lovely to look at, but lacked both the emotional punch and the uniquely unpredictable vocabulary of those previous works.


 

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A review of Charlotte Ballet by Lawrence Toppman in The Charlotte Observer.

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Charlotte Ballet’s Innovative Works, retooled this year by artistic director Hope Muir to match out-of-town choreographers with UNC-Charlotte literary experts, offers that pleasure in both halves. “Shakespeare Reinvented,” which runs for three weeks at McBride-Bonnefoux Center for Dance, gives glimpses into five plays – four in the first half, one in the shorter second – in ways that are accessible or baffling but seldom dull.

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A review of New York City Ballet by Gay Morris for danceviewtimes.

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“Mozartiana,” too, lacked conviction. Maria Kowroski, who often dances the major ballerina role, was slow and slightly ponderous in her movement. Her partner, Tyler Angle, who was dancing with new found panache last season, here was getting through the steps, and little more. Daniel Ulbricht, in the wonderful male solo, seemed to be thinking mostly about courting the audience. One missed Anthony Huxley’s pristine accounting of the dance. Despite these less than sterling performances, the evening succeeded in demonstrating Balanchine’s preferred treatment of Tchaikovsky’s music, and that is something to be grateful for.

 

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A review of San Francisco Ballet by Claudia Bauer for The San Francisco Chronicle.

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Froustey’s interpretation has grown since her 2015 debut in this production. The character’s allure and exultant confidence come naturally, as do the extended balances on pointe; she’s gained more-disciplined timing that help bring character and music into sync. She kicked off sparks in the electrifying diagonale of pirouettes; in the elegant Dulcinea adagio, she was attended by Koto Ishihara’s gracious Queen of the Dryads  and Norika Matsuyama’s sprightly Cupid.

 

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A review of the English National Ballet in "Manon" by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, "Landgraf on Dance."

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Poor taste sabotaged elements of the production beyond the set and costumes. Why, for example, did Monsieur GM so ostentatiously sniff the crotch of Manon (Jurgita Dronina) as she slid her splayed legs along his neck during the salacious pas de trois instigated by her brother Lescaut (Daniel McCormick)? Monsieur GM subsequently fingered his erection and stupidly gawked into space. Sex sells, sure – but when featured that blatantly, we move to another level entirely. Moments later, the fight between Lescaut and De Grieux (Issac Hernández) ends with De Grieux crouched on the floor amidst cheaply sparkling coins and Lescaut frozen above him in winner’s pose. The pair is caught in the glare of a spotlight as they await the curtain’s close – a scene that might fit into a musical, but has no place in this ballet. ......

 

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A review of San Francisco Ballet by Terez Rose for Bachtrack.

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On opening night, Mathilde Froustey and Angelo Greco were perfectly cast as Kitri and Basilio, meeting all of the ballet’s challenges, the presage lifts on Greco’s part, and pre-fish-dive moments where Froustey must fling herself his way with utter abandon before he catches her and dips her. In Act I, when Kitri’s father, Lorenzo (Val Caniparoli) decides to match up his daughter with the wealthy but foppish Gamache, rather than the penniless Basilio, it sets off a comic caper, one that soon includes Don Quixote, who mistakes Kitri for Dulcinea, his idealized true love. Alexandre Cagnat was hilarious as a fussy, lavender-costumed Gamache. Pascal Molat as Sancho Panza brought equal comic brilliance to his role, wildly funny yet never buffoonish. When he was flung in the air from a blanket, the local men holding it like a firemen’s net, it was huge, campy fun to watch his ungainly figure be launched high and sprawl downward.

 

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