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Wednesday, November 7

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Festival Ballet Providence presents new works.

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Then there’s Courtney Asselin, a Pawtucket native appearing for the first time on the company’s stage. Asselin, a rising talent, has danced with the modern troupe Fusionworks and now teaches in Festival Ballet’s school.

 

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A review of the Staatsballett Berlin in "La Bayadere" by Marina Harss for DanceTabs.

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This makes for a completely different experience of the ballet, particularly if the production one is used to is Natalia Makarova’s for American Ballet Theatre. What happens, in essence, is that the evening builds and builds, from mime and storytelling to pure, abstract dance in the Shades, with the bravura dancing saved for the final act. The expressiveness of the mime is essential, and it is clear that the Ratmanskys placed great emphasis on bringing out the dancers’ actorly qualities. They also invited a specialist in Indian dance, Rajika Puri, to help them connect the movements – a touch to the head in greeting, the placement of the arms on the chest – with their underlying meanings, fanciful as they may be.

 

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Nashville Ballet presents a new ballet on the subject of the women's suffrage movement.

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The ballet they are preparing is called 72 Steps, referring to the 72 years of campaigning for women's suffrage that led to the 1920 ratification of the 19th Amendment. It centers on Nashville's role in the movement.

 

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Houston Ballet's Nutcracker Market opens this week.

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This is the 38th year for the event featuring more than 270 merchants inside NRG Center.

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A review of "Balanchine: the City Center Years" by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

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“The Four Temperaments,” Balanchine’s 1946 modernist showcase to the music of Paul Hindemith, looked freshly minted in performances by Chicago’s Joffrey Ballet. Each of the featured dancers in its three theme movements and four central variations performed with a striking clarity and simplicity that stirringly held their stage. To single out but one dancer, Greig Matthews, at different performances, danced both the work’s “Third Theme,” with its tricky partnering demands, and its “Phlegmatic” variation, characterized by artfully collapsing and melting moves, all with notable finesse and dignity.

 

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Kazan erects a monument to Rudolf Nureyev.

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In Kazan opened Russia’s first monument to the famous ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev. The ceremony was attended by top officials of Tatarstan, and the author of the sculpture was Zurab Tsereteli, TV channel “MIR 24”.

 

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